Jump to content

1915 Chase truck


Recommended Posts

Believed to be a sole surviving American 1915 Chase truck RHD thought to of been supplied through a dealer in Putney where it was fitted with a second hand bus body from  a Commer which was presumably requisitioned for the war effort. 

7DAEEFDD-BB14-46A1-9A9B-E2D3FD328C29.jpeg

D64541F2-FC3F-46B9-B89E-8ED75A0F28D7.jpeg

63E28EFF-0135-40D0-ACD6-8E0FEAB755E4.jpeg

D990AE8D-6110-44FB-9A35-2A2C031D5723.jpeg

080B074A-F0B4-42AC-9AA1-519541B3E97B.jpeg

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Chase Truck info off the WWW.

Amongst the many American manufacturers who are taking advantage of the exceptional opportunities for trade now offered in this country must be reckoned the Chase Motor Truck Co., of Syracuse, New York, U.S.A. This firm is represented in London by the St. George's Motor Co., Ltd., Fulham Road, Keneington, S.W., and our representative, on calling at this address recently, was pleased to be able to examine the three different models which they are handling. These are known as : Model T, I ton ; Model R, 2 tons ; Model 0, 3 tons. As these are all on similar lines, we shall confine ourselves in the following few notes to the description of the largest. The first thing that strikes one is the live-axle drive, this being, we believe, up to the present, a characteristic of only a minority of American-manufactured machines. The engine, which is manufactured by the Continental Manufacturing Co. of the States, is one which is fairly well known in this-country. In the vehicle under review, the 40 h.p. model is used, this being a i four-cylinder engine, .q in. by 5 n. bore and stroke respectively, having pair-case cylinders with all the valves on one side. Adjustable tappets are provided enclosed by easily-detached covers.  

The carburetter fitted as standard is the Holley, and ignition is by Bosch magneto with automatic advance.

The engine control is by hand lever on the steering wheel, which provides for a minimum setting. This is combined with an accelerator pedal in the usual position.

A governor is fitted and arranged that it can be set so as to come into operation at any particular speed, and afterwards sealed so that it cannot be modified without the knowledge of the owner.

Unit Construction.

The power is taken from the engine by a dry-plate clutch with Raybestos inserts. Unit construction is adopted for the crankcase and gearbex, thus obviating the necessity for universal joints between these two components, Four speeds are provided, the third speed being the direct drive.

Substantial Worm-driven Axle.

A long tubular propeller shaft takes the drive from behind the gearbox to the worm-driven rear axle. This is a substantial component, constructed by the Sheldon Axle Co. The worm and wheel, however, are made by David Brown and Sons, of Huddersfield. The whole of the gearing and shafts are contained in a crucible cast-steel case, being carried therein on suitable ball bearings. Thrust ball races are also provided wherever needed.

While discussing this component we must draw attention to what seems to be a mis-statement in the specification of these models, wherein it is stated that the entire load is carried •on the rear-axle housing. It is possible that the American public may not gather from this paragraph exactly the same meaning as we should do over here. As a matter of fact, from an examination of the details of the axle, it is quite obvious that the driving shafts are only of the semifloating type, and that, in addition to transferring the torque, they also carry the load.

Another feature which seems to call for criticism is the universal joint immediately in front of the rear axle. This strikes us as being very small for a chassis which is intended to carry such a load. A Live-axle Chassis of American Manufacture. Its Worm and Wheel by David Brown and Sons.

Central Control.

Taking it all together, the chassis may be said to be quite a good example of American construction, and it has several special minor features which are commendable. The change-speed lever, for example, is carried directly from the gearbox and is placed in the centre of the chassis. The method of construction, of course, obviates any possibility of binding of the control shaft owing to frame warp.

Substantial Steering Gear.

The steering gear appears to be fairly substantial ; the joints are well designed, being of the balland-socket type, but so arranged that it is impossible for the rods to fall away from the ball when worn. Ample braking power is provided; both service and emergency brakes take effect on drums in the rear wheels_ They are of good size, and can be quickly adjusted, and, further, are fitted with renewable linings of Raybestos.

Low Reduction for First Speed.

The choice of two ratios can be had in the back-axle gear, either 11i to 1, or n to 1 is permissible. The manufacturers further make a point of a very low reduction for the first speed in the gearbox, their object being to render the climbing of practically any hill a certainty. We understand that, while demonstrating in this country, the'ibillclimbing capabilities of this chassis have beenxa subject of favourable comment.

At present the wheels are prepared for American-sized tires. We draw attention to this, as in previous reviews of recent U.S.A. imports, for we are of opinion that this circumstance is undoubtedly a drawback, but we understand from the St. George's Motor Co. that they will arrange for British standard tires to be fitted on request.

s-l640.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

This one hasn`t been hiding really , probably just forgotten as it was originally saved by Michael  Banfield and sold  quite a while before the  auction of auctions .

Edited by PITT24423
.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have heard of David Brown being involved in USA production but this is the first time I have seen such a specific mention.

Very unusual for the time to have unit construction. Syracuse was also the home of Brockway and other truck builders.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Old Bill said:

Do you have the engine?

Steve

No   , hopefully a Continental or something period will turn up by the time we get round to it . For the time being we will stabilise and treat everything whilst it awaits its turn and decide exactly what body it will end with. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 hours ago, mammoth said:

I have heard of David Brown being involved in USA production but this is the first time I have seen such a specific mention.

It just says "David Brown Type" which might just mean that it uses the David Brown worm gear patents. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, radiomike7 said:

From Wiki:

In 1913 they (David Brown) established a joint venture in America with Timken for Radicon worm drive units.

But I doubt that is what is actually in the rear axles, as a different manufacturer is mentioned. 

(I have something of an interest in David Brown, my late dad started with them at 14 straight out of school, and left 49 years later having worked his way up from fitter, via the drawing office, to service manager and senior commissioning engineer)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Well how about this for a bit of luck ! A massive thanks to RP for digging these priceless photos  out for me . The first photo C1910 with the body mounted on the probably new Commer and the second photo showing the same body mounted on the very same Chase we have at ours today.....unbelivable 🤩

1839310195_Delin1964.thumb.jpg.1912d24464875853059833355ff2928d.jpg

 

1464717936_Chasebus.thumb.jpg.7f992ac6a080a14bc43ba70291989313.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, PITT24423 said:

 

Well how about this for a bit of luck ! A massive thanks to RP for digging these priceless photos  out for me . The first photo C1910 with the body mounted on the probably new Commer and the second photo showing the same body mounted on the very same Chase we have at ours today.....unbelivable 🤩

 

 

1464717936_Chasebus.thumb.jpg.7f992ac6a080a14bc43ba70291989313.jpg

This photo is fascinating as it seems that the bus was operating in Ashford Kent, the route / destination the front says Ashford, Kennington and Willesborough  ............. my home territory!

And the bus has a Kent registration too

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/25/2021 at 7:51 AM, andypugh said:

But I doubt that is what is actually in the rear axles, as a different manufacturer is mentioned. 

(I have something of an interest in David Brown, my late dad started with them at 14 straight out of school, and left 49 years later having worked his way up from fitter, via the drawing office, to service manager and senior commissioning engineer)

The article is quite specific:- the axle  is made by Seldon (a truck manufacturer) and the worm gear (and hence presumably the differential) is made by David Brown of Huddersfield.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your second photograph, Duncan, was taken at this location.   Faversham Road, Kennington, Ashford. Kent.  The white quoins and label course are quite distinctive which I why recognised them.  Amusingly, it is still a bus stop to this day, to the right just out of shot.

Dave

kenroad.thumb.jpg.5a6a1d44bd2f47ca0878c25785b6387f.jpg

 

Edited by Scrunt & Farthing
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here`s a copy of the original Commercial Motor artical which RP has also dug out of his achive .

As to the "ill fated " could it of been a photo of a Pals  brigade as i can`t spot any women but a couple of them appear too old perhaps with the photo perhaps being taken in happier times but they don`t look that happy and who were "The Blackheath Hill City Sons",was Kathleen the name of the bus.....  who knows ?

 

Chase092.thumb.jpg.87067b77d703629764856b787f670336.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, andypugh said:

II am not sure what we are seeing to the right of the bus stop in the original photo. 

I thought that, Andy.  It is the end wall of the house with the white quoins and arched headers.  There was a space which is why you can see the end wall of the house in the first photo.  The space has been filled with what is now 149A Fav Road.  The conservation officer has done a good job of demanding the same brick bond as next door, but you can see it is a new-build infilling from the brick headers on the windows and the stretcher bond below the DPC level.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...