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  1. Bad weather's no longer a problem, I’ve just extended the garage😬 The wife had mixed emotions and started shouting something about a Fox Hat !! no idea what she was saying as I had the grinder going🤔
    4 points
  2. Bit more progress on the Tanker this weekend. Down to the small bits now, the five minute jobs that take all day. Fuel filter/sediment bowl fitted and a quick test. Felt it was worth a short video, as she ticked over without stalling. Bit too slow mind and still needs adjusting. Now the fuel tank is fitted, next job wire up the fuel gauge. Connecting the sender is fun, working through a small hole in the pump room floor. Five cables to cram in, on the right terminals. Then the dashboard end, which is not quite as bad. Took the steering wheel off to g
    2 points
  3. I like the work round the windscreen recess. Looks very neat.
    1 point
  4. Absolutely superb. Just goes to show what can be achieved with some thought, planning and teamwork.
    1 point
  5. Great teamwork, an excellent job!
    1 point
  6. The 1918 FWD Model B with the Ordnance Repair shop body has passed anther hurdle as the body was reunited with the chassis. The truck starts stops shifts into all gears. It has been a hard four year project certainly harder than any of my other smaller vehicles. Here is the before and after
    1 point
  7. Hopefully that thick plate has protected the frame underneath. My frame had similar on the other side under the battery tray. It appears the battery had leaked acid over the frame and eaten it. Someone then welded plate over the top after the frame failed but didn’t bother to realign it. When I cut the plate off there was a misalignment of about 1/2” between the 2 half. This had put a twist on the leaf spring and the front hanger was really badly worn. fortunately the rest of the frame was exceptional so I made a new front horn and fitted a new battery tray and it’s as good as new.
    1 point
  8. 1 point
  9. Nearing end of full restoration (95% completed) over nearly 10 years must be sold due to retirement from hobby. Contains all the original electronics which has been thoroughly restored and mostly working. Had a crew of 4 and signals from the radar were fed to a predictor which would enable the ack-ack guns to follow the radar tracking. Would make a great show piece and tows well at 9.5 tons. Extremely rare item of this country's heritage. Have all the full workshop manuals. Lots of spare parts including 5 new tyres. Sensible offers please.
    1 point
  10. It’s always worth popping it on eBay. A few years ago I replaced a really cheap looking vintage plastic damper knob off my old Enfield WD/CO and through it in the bin (literally from about 10 foot away). I fitted the £30 NOS knob and was chuffed to have “fixed” this issue. About a week later I saw this know in the bin and thought I’d pop it on eBay. To my surprise it got a bid, then another, and then messages wanting to ‘buy it now’. It sold for something like £280 to a guy in Malaysia. He backed out the next day with a lame excuse and I offered it to the next highest bidder. He
    1 point
  11. @Jessie The Jeepit should be fixed now as I installed the update (yes, another one).
    1 point
  12. I am looking at HMVF on a PC running Linux Mint. I see quite a lot of minor changes to colours and text layout which I will presumably get used to but I note when I look at a thread that I have looked at before, there is now a line drawn across the page under the posts that I have already seen, thus highlighting those that have been added. Good idea ! I also find that, in the list of threads, if I hover the cursor over the title of a thread so that the preview window appears, if I then click on 'mark this thread read' button, instead of just deleting the green (or is it blue now ?) dot, i
    1 point
  13. Yes pedals out, transmission plate off, wiring disconnected/removed, steering wheel and or shaft/box removed. Fuel lines if still connected, accelerator link etc. etc. sounds a lot but it’s pretty straight forward.
    1 point
  14. This weekend we managed to get the chassis into daylight to get some paint on it, hopefully soon we will start to put parts back on.
    1 point
  15. Just as long as it was not pollyfiller!
    1 point
  16. Here’s a few photos of the Liberty rear wheels with her new tyres moulded on. Thanks for correcting me on the material , knew it was “poly” something lol!!! So far so good 👍
    1 point
  17. Like to see the face of your local bmw dealer when you turn up with that... 😊
    1 point
  18. And just in the nick of time - the forum is fixed! Thanks for your patience guys and have a great weekend!
    1 point
  19. Looks fantastic. Great to see your Daughter enjoying actually making something. Not a lot of kids want to do that these days. Any plans to exhibit? That quality needs to be shown off.
    1 point
  20. 1 point
  21. I think you've put the inner frame in back to front, the handle should be on the inside The sliders and hand tightenings are all available from Dallas auto or Joes motor pool and do pop up on ebay quite a lot if you want originals..
    1 point
  22. Looking North West, circa 1918 A Handley Page W.8 over the Cramlington aerodrome during the 1932 Air Pageant. Looking East, circa 1915. https://www.nelsam.org.uk/NEAR/Airfields/Histories/Cramlington.htm
    1 point
  23. Here is the last one from the 1926 series.
    1 point
  24. 1 point
  25. Here's a couple of aerial shots from 1926.
    1 point
  26. With the commencement of WWII it was expected that the German Afrika Corp would overrun Egypt from the south, and the Russian army would invade from the north, so all British women and young children not in essential occupation had to evacuated, via the Suez Canal to South Africa. Mrs H Graham reluctantly departed Palestine via Suez Canal in 1941. She never saw her husband or son again. Her husband Capt Graham RE and later Chief Engineer Palestine Railways was required to stay at his posting because the railway system was deemed essential work. At age 18 their son was not clas
    1 point
  27. Still a lot of airfields left in the UK. Good to see there are some people driving in a little group. A few friends of mine came over in their Renegade Jeep to join my brother and me in his Jeep during the heatwave. Will be strange coming September to basically have no events for market Garden.
    1 point
  28. Hi. Sorry for the delay in replying but first of all - message to Old Git about photos - will sort it out asap. Next XS650. Manty thanks for your interest about the Albion and have put together a brief history. BY1 Chassis: Order placed by the War Office to Albion Motors for delivery from 1937 - 1940. These were used for G.S trucks, Bridging Equipment, Pontoon Body, Trestle/Sliding Bay Units and Small Box Girder Bridge. Fitted with Albion engines EN214/215 - Petrol 4 cyl, capacity 3.89 litres. Chassis Start Number 52000A . BY3 Chassis: Order placed by th
    1 point
  29. As a citizen of the USA, I humbly apologize for that complete lack of taste (and tact) exhibited by my countrymen. As a feeble defense, I will offer that since our government won't see fit to allow it's citizens to buy it's surplus armor, we who enjoy such things have become a bit of a desperate bunch.
    1 point
  30. Let bubba loose on that one to save ours (although it looks like he’s made a start with the winch and those wheels.
    0 points
  31. Hello everyone! I'm Zeke Hocking. I am a twenty-something recent university graduate, in anthropology, that spends far too much time reading, researching, and learning about military history, particularly that of the UK in the time since, well, the USA declared its independence. I find the immediate post-Second World War period and the Cold War to be interesting from a collector and historical perspective due to all the twists and turns (large and small) that occurred as the British Empire was dismantled (?, I don't have a good single word to describe the process, hence my interest hah!)
    0 points
  32. Nice Pathe film of Humber vehicles going through their paces.
    0 points
  33. The engine ID plate has : engine type; number; date, so that data would be useful. The nearside radiator side piece is from post war. In the absence of a chassis no to help pin down a date the following will help: The white enameled "driver instruction" plate in the cab changed in 1919, (Leyland Motors 1914 Ltd to just Leyland Motors Ltd ??) to can we have a photo of that, also a close up of the brake cross/compensating shaft support bracket. wheel base measurement The original cast alloy water jacket covers have a habit of corroding to nothing and yours have been rep
    0 points
  34. This FV432 is indeed one of the prototypes and is significantly different to the series production ones. Its registration is actually 216 BXR which is has always carried. It never had an army registration though the Pre-Production FV430s (with 'W' numbers) did have army registrations (from 03DA04 to 03DA30 I believe). It has resided at the Bo'ness and Kinneil Railway near Edinburgh where that photo was taken but is being returned to Bovington. Once Fv432 production was established P4 went to FVRDE at Chertsey where it was used for experiments into hydrostatic steering transmissions and other p
    0 points
  35. I have a feeling that I read somewhere that some had a remote gear lever either a different top cover or something attached to it, meaning the lever pivot was in the cab. Not got a manual to check on this.
    0 points
  36. David, I suspect that is the RAC Horse Power rating, like a Bedford 28hp which is actually around 72 brake horse power in actual output. The RAC rating was a formula for taxation of vehicles.
    0 points
  37. "i learnt not to throw stuff out from that, well not to until I’d confirmed it as junk" No such thing as junk its all "stuff". Partners might not agree though...🙄
    0 points
  38. Thank you for your comments. In 1937 the Foden was fitted with a set of Pickering Governors for driving a stone crusher in the quarry, so as these are on the Foden now I feel that it would be chronologically incorrect if I were to return it to its WW1 guise. After it’s life with Devon CC It was sold (in 1950) to Mr Shambrook of Devon (for £18) and then in 1962 to Paul Corin if Cornwall. During this period of ownership it was painted maroon and that is how it was when sent to America in 1966, and likewise when it returned in 1991. When it was painted maroon, thankfully
    0 points
  39. Lifting wise, I have the possibility to clamp pulleys to beams against the roof. I plan to build a front and back attachment frame so I can hoist the frame and pivot the tub so I can access it from all sides. I can pull it upwards for 'storage' against the roof.
    0 points
  40. I bought my first in 1986 I think. It didn’t have a deac cert, it came with a Proof House certificate stating it could not be proofed/beyond proof. I still have it, it’s one of those things I don’t think I’ll sell as I was a kid and saved up all my pocket money to buy. I think it cost the princely some of £45!
    0 points
  41. Not much has happened recently, work has been hectic and laid up with a bad back hasn’t helped...but I’ve managed to get a few small jobs done. Flushed the radiator out and refitted it. The throttle took a bit more working out, the previous owner had bodged a cable that just didn’t really work and the hand throttle had been disconnected main because the timing cover was resting on top of it. Now I know it doesn’t look much but it took hours !! Fitting, removing, refitting, removing, welding small brackets, and fettling just so everything cle
    0 points
  42. Any thickness will act as a heat sink, but the thicker the more rigid you can clamp to. I’ve been using 3mm which is a happy medium I think....but I’m by no means a pro.
    0 points
  43. this was on another forum, a chap is building a half size traction engine in the US. He made a mould and made his own rubber tyres. May be of interest / use? The relevant part is near the end of the first page. hopefully this link will work: https://tractiontalkforum.com/showthread.php?t=45771 david
    0 points
  44. It is a Kenworth cabover that belonged to a recovery company in Bristol.
    0 points
  45. Eventually it was time to go, so we set off back towards the technical site gate. Since Neil had to lock up after we left, he took up position at the back of the convoy as there wasn't space for the whole convoy just outside the airfield gate. The rest followed me back to the camp site. I've missed out a number of pictures from day one but both the morning and afternoon tours can be found on my website, here - http://www.sacarr.co.uk/mymvs/events/2020/tranwell_a.htm and here - http://www.sacarr.co.uk/mymvs/events/2020/tranwell_a2.htm I'll post the pictures from da
    0 points
  46. There is more to the story; The caption to this photograph is: Light Ford Ganger's trolley which has it it's own turntable, passing over temporary bridge repairs. British military patrol with pick up converted for railway use at Kilometer 142.225 On the Hedjaz Railway, a washed out bridge at Makarram in the Yarmuk Valley, Trans Jordan Feburary 1935. Engineer Graham up on the line wondering what to do about it. Hedjaz Railway, washout at Kilometer 345.822 between Amman and Ma'an, Trans Jordan 11 November 1937. This was a near thing
    0 points
  47. British military operated Ford V8 truck converted with armoured body. Mr Davies of the Permanent Way Instutution (P.W.I.), with the red flag. The PWI was staffed by the Australian Railway Construction and Maintenance Group at the request of the British government. Palestine Two Ford V8 armoured trucks coupled together for fast speed in either direction "sweeping" the line. The overhead guard is for protection against bombs thrown from bridges and cuttings. July 1938 Palestine.
    0 points
  48. I hope this is of interest, it’s an account of a steam wagon driver, driving something much like my own wagon. It is from “The Worlds Fair” of January 1916 JUST ONE DAY IN A WAGON IN FRANCE - by “Norman” ’There are eighty four steam wagons “parked” in one large yard, hence its name “Lurry Park”. You set off at 4.30am from your tent, which is a good mile from the above mentioned park, and on arriving you start a game of “hunt your slipper”, or I should say hunt your engine; for remember there are eighty four engines, all like yours and the majority of them have been parked aft
    0 points
  49. http://www.crossley-motors.org.uk/history/military/FWD/fwd.html
    0 points
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