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  1. Due to the shortage or perceived shortage I have not been out in my Lwt for a few weeks and did not want to upset the neighbours who need fuel more than me. I did see this which made me smile! I did not have the heart to say its actually a CET
    3 points
  2. Clearly I’ve used up my goodwill allowance today “ I’ll get me coat “
    3 points
  3. Hi Nicked from a Facebook Page By the way not much fuel in the Portsmouth area at the moment Cheers Richard
    2 points
  4. @steviem Silicone to put the glass in. Cliff at Universal Jeep Supplies said that the proper rubber seals just trap water in the frame, speeding up the rust. Silicone keeps the water out all together, but you'd need to do the same for the rubber seal on the bottom and outside edge of the frame, or water will just get in there too.
    1 point
  5. Hello Ron, I have a few spare timing gears in my box of engine parts. If you're interested I'll see what I have and send you a picture. One of the sets I have is a slightly different cam shape to the others, although I'm not sure what Royal enfield model they were from. Send me an email if you want me to look them out. Regards, Tom
    1 point
  6. Yes, that's probably what it says, it's incredible that the cards survive at all as Colonel Penny was ordered to destroy them, luckily I got them. All persons that actually worked with these cards have passed away now, but I did try in the past when the good Colonel was still under us to ask him about abreviations and meanings, but he always said, "I'm retired now, and don't want to think about my work anymore" so never got much out of him, the lunches in the Officers mess at the Ayrshire barracks in Mönchengladbach were always good though! Lex
    1 point
  7. Hi Andrew, The reference starting MAR/ probably refers to the RAOC Central Vehicle Depot at Marchington, Staffs. regards, Richard
    1 point
  8. Home straight now! I have been assembling all the bits. firstly by fitting studs.. They were too long! I went back and checked the originals and they are identical so not sure what went wrong there. I took them out, threaded them a bit more and shortened them before fore finally fitting them. Then I got to the end ones and they were too short! They are identical to the originals but then I remembered that two studs had no nuts on them. I have made new ones. And for the top tank. This time, I cut the main gasket first. This is from rubberized cork, as recommended by Steve at CPA radiators. I treated the gaskets with 'Heldite' which had been recommended to me. It is very like the old 'Foliac' jointing and smells pretty bad. Works OK though. Then the water return. This time the studs were too long. I don't know how I managed to make such a mess of them. Oh well. And the filler neck after a bit of Brasso. The core still carries a lot of water stains so I had a go at cleaning it with soapy water and a scrubbing brush. This morning, I fitted the side castings and stuck the gasket down with Heldite. Amazingly, all of the holes lined up. Even more amazingly, the holes lined up in the bottom tank as well and I didn't have to poke a drill through any of them which was most satisfying. Turn it over and on to the top tank. That fitted OK as well so really making progress now. The moment of truth. Will it fit? The answer was no! The radiator tie-rod eye fouled the underside of the bonnet frame. I don't know how I managed that but in the end, just sprung it up and over the top. Spot the deliberate mistake! I fitted the outlet spigot the wrong way up! That was soon sorted and I cleaned and fitted the return pipe and the overflow. The rest of the engine is still filthy but that is a job for another day. The moment of truth! Filled to the brim with water coming out of the overflow but no leaks. Amazing. A whole lorry again! I swung it and it fired on the fifth compression which isn't bad after standing for over a year. I let it idle until everything was hot and no leaks showed themselves. We have a lorry again! Next job is to give it a good service and a thorough clean and out for a test run. Let's hope the weather is nice again next weekend. Steve 😁
    1 point
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  10. We are still doing battle with the wheels. One is still attached to the chassis but Dad has been working on the other. The wheelwright has had a look and stated that this wheel isn't bad but needs new felloes. We need to prepare it and then deliver it to him. Dad has spent a lot of time knocking out bolts. They are an interesting variant of the coach bolt. They are all a boit ropy so Dad has turned up some new ones (9/18" dia, just to be awkward) from some M16 bolts. The brake drum is not very well either. An attack with the wire brush has shown that the surface is too far gone and must either be skimmed or replaced. Fortunately, we have a spare in the collection and some attention with the flap wheel showed it to be serviceable. So, we have to get the old one off. My best find at Beaulieu this year was this pin spanner. Perfect for removing bearing nuts! This wheel still weighs coming on for a couple of hundredweight so we lowered it onto blocks using the chain block. Then we tried to knock the drum off by hitting it between the spokes. Not a hope so out with the propane. Some further knocking cracked the joint and two days of hitting it have moved the drum an inch where it has stuck As neither of us is really up to sustained hammer work, we have given up and are now ordering up the steel to make a puller. Once the drum is off, the wheel can go to the wheelwright. Then we have the next fight which is to get the second wheel off the axle. I shall be glad to see the back of this job! Steve 🙂 Like
    1 point
  11. Undercover Covers seems to get good reviews for their tilts, but I have just come across this alternative supplier based in Oxfordshire who has had good feedback. Might be useful as I understand Undercover Covers has had problems keeping up with the demand and/or staffing? https://www.allwheeltrim.co.uk/homepage.html#Homepage
    1 point
  12. Thank you Barry but you are far too kind. The last few pieces now before reassembling the thing. There is a strange aluminium spacer on the water pipe flange. This was corroded so I put it in the chuck and gave it a skim to clean. The last part was the radiator stay bracket. This is just an eye bolted into the top tank. Unfortunately, the original was just mild steel and broke off so I elected to make a new one from bronze. It was tough old stuff! Drilling bronze is horrible as it grabs the drill as it warms up. I managed to stall the mill with a 3/8" drill before I got through. The end has a nice radius which I machined as a series of flats before cleaning with a file. Unfortunately, I had to use my old mill as the nice new one has expired! Some sort of electrical fault which needs investigation. I wonder if the drilling upset it? Anyway, the result is nice and I made a brass nut to go with it. Reassembly next! Steve 🙂
    1 point
  13. Yes it is very much like the waterbeach saga and as with waterbeach chobham is far from finished ,as for conjecture well I gave out the coordinates for water each to the inch ,if that isn't putting your money where your mouth is I don't know what is ....patience.......
    1 point
  14. Thank you for the comment, but I must stress I do not regard myself as a skilled professional. If these various blogs help and or encourages just one person to have a go it's achieved some small thing. The Historic vehicle media, club rooms and show beer tents are full of commentators noting the lack of young people attracted into restoration and collecting of any shape or form. It's noticeable at shows now that the average age is well above 40 and rising for a large proportion of owners, there are a number of factors that contribute to this which don't need rehashing here. I've spent over 49 years of my life outside of my professional career and large sums of money doing what I do. I was taught by men who are now longer alive. I have in my collection auto engineering books that are now over 80 years old detailing methods and techniques that have not been taught for over 50 years. I'm 64, many of my life long friends and associates in this game who also took time and trouble to teach me are older than me some by a good margin (you know who you are). If we don't start to pass on what little we know then I fear our vehicles will slowly disperse back into the scrapyards from which they originally came. For our collective effort and for what the vehicles represent it has to be worth more than that. The alternative is we sit in our little huddles in the show beer tents and our dark dingy sheds complaining about our various ills and pills struggling with the decision to have that second pint or not if we don't want to be up twice in the middle of night. Then when we can't climb into the cabs any more it'll be off to the crusher with them because nobody cares anymore in this bright new electric era. We are under threat from the vision of a brave clean new world the fewer we become the easier target we make. Phew!! that's all a bit heavy for a Sunday morning sorry chaps must be the pain meds for the bad back, I'm off to the workshop to measure some big ends. Pete
    1 point
  15. Good to see someone taking the time to pass their knowledge on, very impressed, keep up the good work 👍
    1 point
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  17. Excellent work and attention to detail 👍
    1 point
  18. I have a selection of nail guns and sharp chisels, what could possibly go wrong 😬
    1 point
  19. If it’s just slightly weeping try Steel seal, I used some on a gpw block about a year ago and it still seams ok.
    1 point
  20. I recall a stubborn tyre on a Allis Bucket at RAF Bruggen back in 1981. Eventually dropped a Dozer blade on the tyre, that shifted it.
    1 point
  21. Must be Stuart Brays? I have an MDD (and MAF) Both correct, so loads of pictures. Ron
    1 point
  22. Any suggestions on what this originally started life as? Clearly orignally 4 wheel steering.
    0 points
  23. Evening everyone Question time??? Now the doors are taking shape I am looking at the glass and winding mechanism, I recently got all new glass cut by a local company, it’s standard 6mm laminated glass which is slightly thicker than the original but there is room for manoeuvre so no problem with fitment So…just for a change the runner on the bottom of the glass is rotted 🙄 My question is….can you buy the runner which is stuck to the bottom of the glass and if so what’s it called ?? It’s difficult to google when you don’t know the name.
    0 points
  24. Update with today’s progress. Under belly diff plate brackets were so badly pitted I have decided to make some new ones. The whole process was a little trial and error. I initially hoped to fold them, due to the complex shape this turned out impossible. I also wanted something that could be repeatable, in the end I fixed on making a little fixture to fold them. The picture detail the progress.
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  25. The last stencilling for the day was on the tailgate. The irony is that most of it will be hidden behind the Pioneer tool rack when it is refitted, but parts of the stencils will be visible. I'm very pleased with the new look and new identity. I can see some additional ammunition crates being made in the future to fill out the back of the truck. The tailgate was hung by the chains for a quick photo. The rear bumperettes need painting while then receive their stencils. After that, it's the hood star, no signals and LHD stencils to add, plus the name repainting once I've finished painting the screen. It all needs a while to fully harden before I start bolting it all back together, so in the mean time, I'll continue with the front roof bow wookwork.
    0 points
  26. More on the Vickers handcart:- https://vickersmg.blog/2018/01/15/project-complete-irish-handcarts/
    0 points
  27. A volume 2! Oh my. Lets see how the German ones sell.
    0 points
  28. Nothing wrong with having a dream or wish list, its always nice to aim for something but you never know what you might turn up in your search. Something else might be more reasonable or available that might take your fancy.
    0 points
  29. Adrian, In view of your comment on the availability of those battle dress tops, I can tell you that the 100th BG didn't arrive until 9th June 1943, so that fits. Incidentally I have never heard of such British made clothing and I am amazed they wore such tat! It does not fit with my wifes belief that they all looked like Richard Gere in Yanks. And Baz, apologies!
    0 points
  30. It's been a while, but the Tiger 1 resto/fab. in Australia is now complete as a static display, using many original parts. I noticed the video series didn't have that many views, which is a shame, so i thought I'd share here. I really like the father/son team aspect of it, what better way to spend time together. Enjoy They also have a blown up early version of the Tiger Turret with Dust-bin cupola
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  31. According to the BP website, BP Ultimate is E5. I do not think we can get away without ethanol in petrol now unfortunately.
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  32. Pete, could i just say thank you so much for this absolutely cracking step by step insight of your project. It truly is incredible, and your explanations of the how`s, whys and do`s and don`ts take me back to when my Grandad and Dad were around, thank you. I am looking forward to all the next stages, very impressive. " boy got skills" as my Grandad used to say. Bruce.
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  33. With the screen off and out of the way, it left the cowl over the instrument panel easy to reach and so the remains of the paint, which had been under the screen, was stripped off. Some areas were wire brushed, the whole area sanded and a number of areas primed, along with some small fixings from the screen. The right side of the body was next, sanding paint and grinding rust spots and quite a lot of slight surface rust. So much of the body was stripped to metal, that after sanding the remains of the paint, the whole side of the body was red oxide primed. With the colder and more damp weather coming, I may finish the welding on the fenders and then get on with the painting of the olive drab. I can get the garage fairly warm with a heater and the paint can bake. The olive drab can then be left to harden fully while I work on the windscreen. By the time that is painted and can be refitted, the truck paint should be hard enough to climb over for the screen fitting.
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  34. So nearly there now, but some more issues thrown up 🙈 ’Flying M’s’ fitted, petrol tap rebuilt, fuel pipe made and knees grips to fuel tank now on. The metal plates that the rubber knee grips fit to were ill fitting, after several hours or fettling we finally have a result!
    0 points
  35. I don't think there is much anyone can do really as it is the mortal coil, classic vehicle interest will continue but it is almost always the older generation that are into classic vehicles and as the elderly people (and vehicles) fall off the perch more 40 plus people will come through but they will be (mainly) interested in the vehicles of their youth or near. Has any classic vehicle club of any time had a large amount of twenty something members. Hence there is not a great deal of interest now in flat tanker bikes or pre 1930 trucks and cars but massive interest in 1970's, 80's and even 90's vehicles. Always exceptions of course , my mate born late 1970s has massive interest in 1950s bikes. Craig
    0 points
  36. I've never heard that theory before but either scenario could not end well. Was Martian the only post war recovery to carry a hot spanner?
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  37. The cam shaft sprocket and timing chain has been removed in these two photos leaving the engine front mounting plate behind. The Canadian Chrysler Dodge long block engine has a different front engine mounting arrangement compared to US manufactured 214 short block engine, the Chrysler engine mounts directly to the front frame cross member with two bolts and coil springs. The mounting plate is held in place by a couple of bolts, the countersunk machine screw that can be seen at the front and two small dowel pins. The way I tackle counter sunk machine screws is first to apply heat using the hot air gun, then one short sharp rap with a hammer and punch the right size for the screw head. Then an impact driver with a screwdriver bade that is the right width and length for the screw slot. Lean into it hard and press the trigger just a squirt on tighten then quickly switch to undo if it moves stop. Repeat the heating then give it anther squirt with the impact on tighten then another longer burst on undo and it should spin out. If not you may need to use a spot heat micro butane torch that plumbers seem to like to set fire to houses with, give it some beans but the key is not to mash the head or unfortunately your next tool of choice will be the drill bit and electric drill with much anguish and gnashing of teeth. Front view that's the end of the cam shaft with the three holes that take the drive sprocket the pipe to the right of it is important it's the main oil feed for the timing gear it needs to be removed very carefully. On rebuild it must go back exactly in the same position or the timing chain will not be properly lubricated, Dodge have a pipe some other makes have a small spout both do the same job. At the top of the block you can see the main water channel to the left and if you look closely you may see something just inside the top of the aperture, this is the distribution tube that squirts water at the under side of valve seats and is a feature common to all Dodge engines more about that nest of vipers another time. To the right the round hole for the water pump along with the three fixing holes for the pump body. Photos: front view Side view note where the oil pipe is pointing and how it is formed it can easily get bent out of shape.. more to follow Pete
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  38. 18 SWG 1.26mm 20 SWG. 0.996mm Used all that filler yet? Enough to make a door : )
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  39. Drivers door done…. Cut out the new skin yesterday afternoon Slotted the hinges first. Joggled the top edge and trimmed. I tried a different method fitting this skin, I applied a generous bead of seam sealer and clamped the skin in place then left it overnight to cure, this made folding the edges so much easier when the skin is stuck in place. Folded and tacked in place, just needs the welding joined, grinding and filling. Not sure if I’ve bought enough filler 😬
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  40. Hi all. An old thread I know but I stumbled across it on Google when researching nelz and elite Background, I used to run a Brit infantry group. Ordered a british bf 6lb AT gun from him in Aug 19. Was told 8-12 weeks. Over 2y later I have the gun but its not complete (initially no rounds and currently no muzzle brake, all included on invoice). Build quality on certain items is shoddy to say the least. Probably 20 emails and the same in calls *and that's me being reasonable *. I have pretty conclusive evidence he is actively screening my calls and emails and I have been lied to on several occasions. Last contact is when he contacted my group *not knowing I ran it* re our attendance of 21 yorkshire war-time so he is still about. Just avoiding his debtors. Just taken him to court for the o/s I had trading standards in Hull track down his new business address for anyone in the same position. EM Fabrications Mendham Business Park Hedon Road Hull HU12 8DZ Feel free to call trading standards in Hull to confirm this. Currently in the process of organising bailiffs. Spoke to several people at latest victory show with 57mm/ 6lb elite weapons and all reported lengthy wait times, threat of court action and dubious build quality. Would highly recommend avoid dealing with nelz. If you are waiting on something from him get the courts involved ASAP. Thanks Will
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  41. Busy weekend for Tankering one way and the other, good results all round. First off, Must big up Richard and Charlotte from RCH canvas. After weeks of measuring making and adjusting, we finally got to the end of the canvas that joins the tank and the pump room. It has been a considerable challenge for them, complicated shape, no pattern and nothing to copy from, built completely from scratch. But they were up to it and the finished product looks pretty good. Top section rivetted on Off side And the near side. Unfortunately I ran out of rivets, so couldn't finish the job, but it all fits nicely and should keep the rain out. After that excitement, moved onto another on going saga. Trying to find the "right" shade of red paint for the drain tap tops and the fuel out valve. I've tried various shades, and didn't like any of them, either too dark or too pink or orange. Got a result earlier in the week and finally found a shade that I think looks right. Minor downside is, it is a coach enamel and takes 3 or 4 days to dry, then several weeks to harden off. Next problem, what colour primer to use, as I know this will affect the final colour. A search of the net suggests white, yellow and even blue. Best answer set up a test From left to right, white, yellow, blue, and red. Interesting result here, not much difference in the white yellow and red, but the blue gave an unexpected bonus. The only blue I had, for the test, was some gloss left over from painting the Saltire badge. Painting over gloss is never good as the new coat tends to slide off, but here it only slid off from the lettering making it look like they had been highlighted. Photo doesn't really do it justice, looks really striking in the daylight, but black lettering would be better than blue. So, clean it all the different colours off. Start with a base coat of gloss black, then red over the top hoping it will slide off in the same way. Again, photo doesn't bring the colour out right, looks pink here. This was taken a few minutes after painting and the red is already sliding off the letters quite nicely. Looks really good Fuel valve looks orange, but honestly it is the same red paint as the valve handle On the other hand, it could be pink. Either way it has got a fortnight to dry, as we are off to Yorkshire to visit the in laws. Plan A, when we get back, is full steam ahead with finishing the pump room now that the new canvas will keep the rain out. I'll let you know.
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  42. Cuts cusses and claret come with the territory. Wait until you start on the Mat. You have done the metalwork apprenticeship then you have the woodwork to start. Please be careful. Great job.
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  43. The most insulting thing about those EGR valves is how you can see them -- from both sides, even! -- and still can't get to them. (And those metal gaskets, augh!) I learnt to do truck tyres by the sledgehammer, angle iron, and levers method on tubeless tyres; it's still hard work, but at least there's fewer pieces to juggle afterwards! Work got a tyre machine a good few months back, now, and it's an absolute life-saver. I can have a tyre stripped down, turned, and back on; in the time it used to take me to break a stubborn bead. I've just got to not forget how to do them the old way...
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  44. You should seriously consider writing spy novels...
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  45. The garage doors do still need altering, but if the Dodge was altered to fit the garage ( rather than the other way around ), there was no longer the pressure of when the builders will turn up. All three vehicles will have to live outside briefly when the work does start. So with the Dodge's future looking more like a standard cargo truck ( but not completely normal, this is me after all ), I set to work taking the first steps towards the conversion and getting it indoors. The Dodge radios and internal equipment were stripped out as the first step. The doors, dome and canvas cab roof were removed and then I started removing the wooden panels. Some of the internal wiring and shelving needed to come out before the side panels as there were lots of items connected together. Here's a few stills from a time lapse video of the teardown. There was some light gluing of panels onto the bows, but most fixings were coachbolts.
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  46. Are you saying that the gearbox inhibit switch has been overridden? If so that is one really dangerous practice.
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  47. Thanks Barry. I have thought about investing in a buffing machine but my experience has always been that it is very difficult to maintain a crisp edge with them. As the crisp edge is such a feature of the Dennis rad and this would be the only big job I would have for one in the foreseeable future, I have desisted and had a go with a flap wheel instead. I did the back with a wheel in the pistol drill, keeping it moving to avoid grooving. That was fairly painless and I finished off with some emery in my hands. The badge was some coarse emery on a flat sanding block and it came up quite quickly. Then I had a go at the front. The flap wheels in the drill and in the angle grinder certainly took the surface off very quickly. However, it took a great deal of care not to groove the surface and then a lot of hand-rubbing with emery to take out the marks. So far it looks pretty good but will need some fine wet-and-dry paper to finish it off. Tedious but coming along. Of course, the big top surfaces remain.... As a bit of light relief, I thought I would make up the replacement studs. I have given in and used stainless for them as the originals have corroded so much and couldn't be removed. Studs are something of a pain, I find, as they are such devils to hold. The first end thread is easy but the second always difficult. To hold them whilst cutting the second end, I made up this holder. I have tried in the past to put a thread right through and simply back up the stud with a bolt but, unfortunately, this didn't work very well as both stud and bolt tended to screw right through when cutting the thread. To get over this, My locking bolt has a finer pitched thread than the stud so the stud cannot screw in during the cutting process. Once the thread is cut, simply back off the locking bolt and the stud will unscrew. This is a good trick to know! All done and I am getting closer to reassembly now! I have some cork gasket on the way for the main joint and am trying to pick up some jointing compound. I think it is going to have to be mail order again. Steve 🙂
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  48. Some sandblasted parts ... And some primed parts ... Looks like a store where you can choose the items you wish 😄 Not much to discuss I guess?
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  49. Spent the evening getting the tank bolted onto the chassis. It’s been on and off three times to get it just right. Then you trash all the nice paint. It didn’t make me mad at all. 😤 That said it happy days when you get to bolt everything back on.
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