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  1. Robert with the deepest of respect take a deep breath and go and sit in the shade old friend Best regards Pete
    2 points
  2. Guys, Yes, I regularly correspond with Mike Starmer and we both agree that seeing a colour photo of a British & Commonwealth Army truck or non-armoured type from WW2 is very rare and often corrupted by the type of colour film but here are some from my collection showing the early G3 / G4 scheme used before SCC.2; This line up of the first Canadian troops to be posted to the UK and I believe they date from 1940. Most of the Canadian CMPs are equipped with CMP 11 Cabs and Bedford & Morris vehicles with aero screens etc Last is an ambulance which I can only guess is in SSC.2 from an unknown date, that shows SCC.2 was mostly brown with a touch of green to it. It was a gift from the Canadian Red Cross.
    2 points
  3. German lawyers wrangle over pensioner's WW2 tank in basement - BBC News
    1 point
  4. I used some of that sealant on the fuel tank of my Austin 7, some 20years ago. After having repaired a single hole with some epoxy. Its still going strong 21 years later.
    1 point
  5. 1 point
  6. Been watching this with great interest. Don't understand even half of it - but love it none the less. Especially with the muppet gif - I saw this on another forum.
    1 point
  7. Hi Mike, I have gone through the rest in some detail now. Comments are: 1. An excellent technical description of the gun and its production variants. Well laid out and well illustrated. 2. A detailed description of the production history of the gun, trailer and ammo, including the contractors and sub contractors. I found this especially interesting, as I am keen on industrial history amongst other things. My own research has not drilled down to the same levels, so I was pleased to see references to the subcontractors' trades and products. It certainly filled in a few gaps in my knowledge 3. Good summary of operational history and salient examples without trying to be a full regimental history. Generally tells us what the regimental issues were where the guns were used. 4. Great narrative stringing all of the production, design, trials and operational info together , as well as the personalities involved. Makes a potentially dry list of facts come alive into an interesting read. (BAMs interaction with Kirby a case in point. Kirby was rather preoccupied with aircraft engine production, so he was drinking through the proverbial fire hose for other war effort projects. Still, his taking on the 25 Pr recuperator was something he should have avoided with hindsight). 5. In 239 pages, info is densely packed and covers every conceivable angle of 25Pr from artillery to tank use. Good value for money IMHO. 6. Comprehensive referencing and end notes. A readable book for anyone interested in the subject, with academic rigor. I like the publications list 😉 7. On arcane points, I was uncertain as to why Ruwolts marked the saddle data plate No.11 Mark. 1, for what should have been marked No.2 Mk.I, (was there a No.11 saddle I didn't know about?) but I was pleasantly surprised that you covered that point. As you say, the standard way of marking is to have model Number (No.) in Hindu-Arabic, and Mark (Mk.) number in Roman numerals. This was done by GMH and everyone else in the British arsenal system. I agree that Ruwolts have intended to use Roman numerals (II) where they should have used a '2', but on short 25 Reg. A8, Ruwolts they have been cheeky and used a '1' instead of a 'I' stamp. Maybe it allowed Charles Ruwolt to economise on stamps! Glad I've cleared that up now.... 8. One of my own projects, now I am in semi-retirement, is to republish my book on Australian manufacturers' codes. That gives the actual makers code marks stamped on the components / ordnance for most of the government factories and contractors you mention. Overall Mike, thanks for writing this book for us artillery aficionados, it is a cracker. I cannot see anyone being bothered to write another book on the subject, as there would be little extra to write about unless they went to the same level of detail on UK and Canadian production. That said, I think your book would cover off on that to the satisfaction of the vast majority of the readership. All the best, and good luck with it, I am sure it will be very successful. Damien
    1 point
  8. yes only early jeeps had the spring the screw hole for the lock plate was left open also the data plates were screwed on with a pressed type nut you can get them i think jeeparts have them
    1 point
  9. THE information was complied from first the number two key cards and contract records and chilwell lists held at the former MUSEUM OF ARMY TRANSPORT and members of the AEC society . The question of service history is one of the most asked by owners of vehicles of the world war two period unless you can find a picture of it in service the answer is unlikely
    1 point
  10. 88 YY 54 HAD the census number of H 4I33563 CONTRACT v3501 was for 623 Matadors had census numbers of H 4133317 TO H 4133939
    1 point
  11. late jeeps had a much higher catch witch did away with the lock plate
    1 point
  12. just spread the legs out a bit so you do not need to drill extra holes that's what i do
    1 point
  13. Thanks for all your help and advice. I will always make sure I carry plenty of water to try and cool things down. Maybe we should all park our military vehicles up through the summer and only take them out when its snowing!
    1 point
  14. Insulate the fuel line, make sure you have the heat shield in place above the pump. I have idly wondered if reproducing the heat shield in stainless may not make it work a bit better than the original mild steel.
    1 point
  15. It could be a good idea to pressure test the fuel line, a friend of mine had exactly the same symptoms on his Dodge, after overhauling the fuel pump to no avail he fitted an electric fuel pump. When he turned the ignition on a very fine jet of petrol shot out of the fuel pipe, the hole was so small it was virtually impossible to see. After replacing the fuel pipe and removing the electric pump it still runs fine.
    1 point
  16. Keith, don't use copper for the fuel pipes as they absorb heat, used steel pipes and if any pipes are in the vicinity of the exhaust manifold used an insulating lagging material. Years ago I did this on my Bedford with asbestos string obtained from a hardware shop in deepest Normandy, it did the trick.
    1 point
  17. And the crane manufacturers are Les Ateliers de Bondy, Seine, who seem to have produced quite a range of machinery, much of it self-propelled. No idea on the chassis, though.
    1 point
  18. It's a firm from Arras Travaux Publics ?????? & Fils.
    1 point
  19. Please, please tell me that the logbook has survived? I always find id rather sad when you have to go down the route of age related plate but....there is a chance; KENTKent History & Library Centre, James Whatman Way, Maidstone, ME14 1LQ (03000 41 31 31) Email: archives@kent.gov.uk Open Monday to Saturday.Registers 1904-1974 (Note KN 4488-92 are omitted from the KN register). GIM register D-G 1-1199; HMC registers 1905-20; TP registers (KT and KE) 1923-34; Registers of imported vehicles. Many of the old archive records are in a word CRAP! One of my bikes which luckily was known to the DVLA still retained the original 20's logbook but Dad bought it because we were looking for a vintage bike with a local number. When I approached the records office (it is shown that they have these registers) we were told that they had been lost in a fire so instead I was send a copy from the cancelation book....our bike is in it; taken off the road in 1935. All it shows is reg number, type of vehicle and who had it. Later records from the three letter sequence that survive include the date but zilch about what the vehicle is! Anyone wishing to try and trace a registration mark head here; Kithead Trust | Educational charity set up to collect and preserve material from the transport industries who have a complete list of what survives and where.
    1 point
  20. fit under the grill other wise the fitting bolts will damage the hood
    1 point
  21. no..... you might have to cut the square part back as the repro light bolts are to long
    1 point
  22. Excellent workmanship 👍👍
    1 point
  23. You've earn't more than tea and biscuits! It looks superb, the work is such good quality. No matter how long it takes, it is preserved and will be a real show stopper.
    1 point
  24. It will be fine, no problem, just get it up to the mark before driving it. I wouldn't discard the new oil you drained out either, I'd put it in clear containers and let any dirt or water settle out a couple of times then just use it for topping up.
    1 point
  25. Came across this on a F/B page, no idea as to its provenance but thought it might interest some of you guys, if only in comparison to the paint job done by Tomo!
    1 point
  26. Fantastic work Pete.
    1 point
  27. Hello Sir, Don't know about that Phil, She's coming together slowly. We were worried about sandblasting the gearbox, steering box and transfercase incase the sand damaged the oilseals or sand got inside any of the casings, so thats why we used the wire wheel which seems to take forever ! Hopefully all the primered parts will be olive drab by Sunday.
    1 point
  28. As Gordon says above treat it as a three speed box with additional crawler gear in first. Many years ago now I did a conversion for a customer on a Carryall where he wanted a higher road speed so he provided a set of power wagon difs with higher ratio than the war time WC ones. It completely changed the characteristics of the truck using first was now a necessity at junctions lights and roundabouts and as you have found 1st to 2nd is a long pull without much road speed to keep the truck moving. However it added about 10 mph to the cursing speed in top but was a night mare on hills as it ran out of puff in top very quickly and then it was foot to the floor in 3rd all the way up hovering over the stick waiting to pull second on occasions something on a stock WC that is only required when climbing a mountain.. The foot note to this is the customer was very happy with the result as he was moving to the Fenlands no hills and long flat roads. Pete
    1 point
  29. Oh my, you are using first gear? First should be reserved for setting off uphill, with a full load, or towing a trailer. Think of it as a three-speed box with an additional granny gear. Starting in second should be fine, the number of changes is greatly reduced and that will help make up for any extra effort. Additionally, only ever select first or reverse when completely stationary, unless you like working on gearboxes.
    1 point
  30. Firstly sorry hear of your Fathers passing but well done you for taking the truck on, so many get sold on by family in double quick time these days. To address your question, the numbers you quote sound just fine for an engine with some miles on it Gordon's advice is worth following perhaps before the winter lay up. Otherwise enjoy the rare truck you now own drive it with the respect that a vehicle of it's age requires and it will last a life time. Pete
    1 point
  31. As I mentioned up thread that's fine for a worn engine. As I understand it the oil pressure gauge just shows you the pressure at the main bearings, the big ends are too far 'down' the supply line to reflect on the gauge. Drive it cautiously and enjoy it. If it hasn't been driven much, then modern detergent oil is liable to flush a pile of crap out of the interior the engine, and some of that can get in important places. You have cleaned the sump which will have got rid of much of it, but now and again it would still be worth warming it up then draining the oil to let it settle in a pan, then pouring the clean oil back in. If any substantial amount of dirt settles out, change the filter then repeat the process after some more use.
    1 point
  32. Part of EMER GENERAL N 800 EMER GEN N 800.pdf
    1 point
  33. Recently did a little experiment on E5 petrol, added 600ml of water to 4 litres of petrol, I extracted the 600ml of water out and another 600ml of Ethanol. It can be got out just takes a lot of effort. Have yet to find out the effect on the engine. Diana
    1 point
  34. Hi All When US went over to E10 gas years ago it had a dramatic and problematic impact on MVs. In as little as one tank full, fuel pumps failed, flexible fuel lines leaked or swollen to the extent they didn't pass fuel, gas cans started leaking around the caps. The first couple parades that year it was not uncommon to have a truck fail, often the story went like this, "well I filled the tank this morning on the way to the parade". The thing noticed was the drop in power and fuel mileage. Once people, in our MV Club figured out what was going on, it was a race find the actual ethonal resistant Gates hose. Fuel pumps were more problematic. Good luck on the change over. Cheers Phil
    1 point
  35. I already use an additive in my fuel to combat the effects of ethanol. More cost, though!
    1 point
  36. "I've got a brand new combine harvester, and I'll give you the key ..." 🙂 Andy
    1 point
  37. An electric tank is the way ahead for the future 😂😂😂😂, electric tractors ploughing fields and electric combine harvesters 😂😂
    1 point
  38. Thanks for the replies gents. The different units marking make sense, it was overhauled in 1956 and cast in 1968 so it had a lengthy service and as you say was probably assigned to different regiments. unfortunately there’s no background colours left to narrow it down. Either way it’s still a nice piece of history.
    0 points
  39. So now it's 2019, and I still haven't finished the Dozer! Had to wait for the proper rubber hose for the hydraulics, and that came in recently, together with the cold weather, so it will take some time, before I fit anything, did get the scraper plate wear pieces painted and trial fitted, just need some bolts shortening, and a weld ground down, then I can fit them properly, but all holes line up nicely. Then the hose stuff, I did not want to go with the modern hoses, I had over the years collected everything to make the original stuff work, exept one set of compression couplings, and I did buy a whole wreck for that!! It does have nice tracks though, so I will keep those! Here some more stuff how the couplings work. The make of the couplings is Eastwood but have not been able to find any parts on the loose anywhere, was difficult to get the brass compression "tubes" off the old hoses, but did manage. So this is all ready to assemble now, but have to figure out the lenght of the hoses used. More later, Lex
    0 points
  40. Ok……..I have a problem and I am seeking help….😁
    0 points
  41. Evening everyone Its been a while since I last posted and unfortunately there has been zero progress, work has been ridiculously busy and it looks set to continue for the foreseeable 🤞 for a lottery win and early retirement!! I did however have a bit of a move around, with the Fordson being in the driveway it was always a bit of a pain to work on and having to put tools away and cover it each night slows things down, so…. I made the side gates to the garage wider…. The furthest the truck has moved under its own steam in the last 25 years was backwards and forwards in my driveway…. What could possibly go wrong!! It hadn’t been started this year so I popped a battery on, put a live feed to the solenoid and it started on the button 🎉🍻 run for 5 seconds, cut out and then refused to start!!! A few hours later and a temporary fuel pipe fitted She started and ran sweet as a nut, it would appear it has developed an air leak somewhere in the fuel system…job for another day. moved it from its resting place and began the slow process of squeezing it down the side of the house. I won’t lie, it was tight!! Finally in😬 also gave me a chance to photograph the rear as it’s always been parked in the hedge. Now there’s a big space in the driveway!! I wonder what could go there 🤔 I can definitely reassure you that I haven’t bought anything else 🤥 Just to finish off, this lightweight is looking for a new home, please pm me if your interested.
    0 points
  42. I asked the same question some years ago for my 2 Pounder Breech Ring. No one knew. I am still looking for a stricker if anyone has found anty or a complete beech block ch block.
    0 points
  43. Why would it still need an MOT? if it’s registered as Historic it should be tax and mot exempt
    0 points
  44. I came to the same conclusion. My 1942 gun is ROF N, which I assume is Nottingham as I know they made Bofors but it could also be Newport.
    0 points
  45. Welcome to the forum, lots of great advice and folks here. Its always great when people ask a question and post the result when its fixed for the next person to benefit from. Greeat stuff, enjoy
    0 points
  46. Yeah I know I was a bit confused about that. I hold lorry and bus and H test doesn't compare with them at all.
    0 points
  47. This week end got some time to work on my jeep breaks and pipes and rebuilt the ford steering box need to blast the rest of the f axle bits and finish off then its mock up an engine and gearbox so i can make the deep mud exhaust out the back only way to do this without getting one shipped from the good old USA at a lot of $$$ is make one from an m38 pipe set i have made one before this way and it works out ok a bit of cutting and welding
    0 points
  48. Once the paint was hard it was time to stuff all the bit's back inside the case the input and output main carrier bearings were like new so they went back in with the new pilot roller cage, new leather rear output seal and new gaskets all round. I was recently asked where I got my gaskets from, the person asking me had never heard of the answer before which I must say surprised me. So for any one who is wondering I've set out below how I do it. I'm sure a lot of people know how to do this so don't bother with the next couple of photos skim through to the finished job photos at the bottom of the page. But for anyone who hasn't made a gasket here's how I was taught to do it below. I make them the old fashioned way with the exception perhaps of one or two specialist engine gaskets like exhaust and head for example I have made exhaust gaskets before but it's a mega pain in the butt and takes a long time if you can get them buy them would be my advice. First off you need gasket paper ( although back in the day any old corn flake packet would do at a push). Gasket paper comes in various thicknesses in long rolls, ( google it it's not expensive compared to buying preformed gaskets). It's important to have a range of of thicknesses in stock. Here for example in the case of the T 9 the pre- load on the input and out bearing races is determined by the number and thickness of gaskets required. These are the gaskets I made for this job This is how they are made: First up cut a chunk of gasket paper big enough to cover the whole mating surface Take a small ball pein hammer and hold the sheet of gasket paper on the job making sure it covers all of the mating surface Find the first bolt hole by rubbing your thumb around where it should be it helps if your thumbs a bit grubby Once you have the marked the first hole hold everything square on the mating surface and gently tap round the mark made by your thumb using the ball end of the hammer, a few taps and the paper cleanly falls away (remember to pick it out of the bolt holes when the job is complete) This bit is important, put a bolt in the hole if it's a threaded hole put the original bolt back in a couple of turns if it's just a clearance hole find a bolt of similar diameter and drop it through the gasket paper this now is your datum point that will help to hold everything square Choose a bolt hole on the opposite side of the work piece and repeat the above procedure and put another bolt in Do this for all the other holes working from one side to other in turn adding a bolt each time When all the holes have been tapped through rub your thumb round the inside edge of the mating flange and gently tap that out the center portion It looks like this now and I've started to tap out the outer edge of the gasket. Notice the angle of the hammer it needs to be at about 45 degrees to the edge of the flange to cut through cleanly Jobs done one PTO gasket Right now for any one who's gone to make a cup of tea and grab a biscuit while all that was going on here's the finished Warner T 9 it just needs the hand brake drum, operating cams and band fitting. I have a new old stock lining that I'll have to drill and center bore to take the rivet head then I'll rivet the lining onto the band but that's for another day. That's all for for now Pete
    0 points
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