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Lwt wheel bearing


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I have inherited a wheel hub for my Lwt and in the bag of bits was the bearing showing severe damage to some of the parts, but I wonder what would cause such. The two parts at the top of the photo are undamaged, but the one in the centre lower is bent both sides and the 'nuts' are cut and heavily scored. Any ideas?

20200702_183701.jpg

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That's the used look.  The washer in the centre gets fitted between the 2 nuts, then the edges are bent round to touch the flat of the nut. Stops it coming undone.

The chop mark in the right hand nut is where some one has used a chiesel to get it undone, rather than a socket, and the scoring on the other nut is most likely from manufacture

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5 hours ago, Zero-Five-Two said:

The chop mark in the right hand nut is where some one has used a chiesel to get it undone, rather than a socket

Standard Land Rover tool!! Don’t think I’ve seen a series Land Rover hub nut without a chisel mark. 

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So those parts are perfectly serviceable? I wonder why the bearing was removed from the hub? Surely it would be best to get new replacement parts. I have the hub tool already.

20200701_134808.jpg

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3 minutes ago, LarryH57 said:

So those parts are perfectly serviceable? I wonder why the bearing was removed from the hub? Surely it would be best to get new replacement parts. I have the hub tool already.

20200701_134808.jpg

Larry,

the bearing falls out of the hub when it is removed from the axle, If the Cup part of the bearing was removed I could understand  your question but as you do not show it then it must still be in the hub.

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Posted (edited)

It is still in place? Apart from changing a rear half shaft I have not yet tackled any wheel related or bearing jobs! However the spare hub is a good place to practise without any risk as it was considered to be scrap by the doner!

Edited by LarryH57
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1 minute ago, LarryH57 said:

It is still in the hub and I think it needs chisling out.

Don’t use a chisel, use a brass drift.

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Posted (edited)
21 hours ago, LarryH57 said:

I have inherited a wheel hub for my Lwt and in the bag of bits was the bearing showing severe damage to some of the parts, but I wonder what would cause such. The two parts at the top of the photo are undamaged, but the one in the centre lower is bent both sides and the 'nuts' are cut and heavily scored. Any ideas?

20200702_183701.jpg

I know that we Jeeps you to bend the washer between the two nuts as it acts as a lock washer, stops the nut vibrating off..

20180415_135021.jpg

Edited by OzH
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And, the same issue with the chisel method of removing nuts..!

This is what came off my Jeep with the replacement in the middle..

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Hi Larry

May I respectfully suggest that you find a friendly garage or friend so you can watch your first bearing being replaced and most importantly correctly adjusted. The adjustment is most important for two reasons, to loose it could cause the wheel to come off, to tight will cause bearing damage. The internet shows mechanics changing a L/R bearing removing the old bearing Race/Cup with a drift, that's ok but I would not use a drift to replace the new item due to possible damage. Line up the new race lightly tapping into place with a copper hammer, then place the old race up side down lip to lip on top of the new race and tap evenly/gently into place until the sound changed to indicate it is fully home. The old race will follow the new into the casting, to remove place bolt in the old race cup from behind without damaging the new and gently tap it out.

The adjustment is easy after you have done several bearings, please take hands on advise as it is a safety factor if you get it wrong. After road testing I always jack up and test for any settlement play, adjust if necessary.

Good luck  Mick

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By chance I have a friendly LR mechanic, who is just waiting like me for lockdown to end and then he can come and stay and make me do the work under instruction! I need to find the part numbers and order the bits to get the job done. Any other tools needed?

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Larry

you will need the correct grease, split pin, locking washers, paper hand towel, couple cans beer that may come in the kit. Get the bearing kit, see what is inside and then talk to you mate to see if he needs anything else.

What is lockdown, not a word used in this free island.

 

Mick

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In theory - you should be using a dti (dial test indicator) to set the end-float , although I don't , for the same reason I don't use a torque wrench as much as I probably should..  V.L. Churchill Tools - offered a attachment bracket for dti (with genuine Land Rover part No.  - check the rear of the Operation Service Manual). I hardly ever see check-nuts with chisel marks because I throw the disgusting things (they are quite cheap).  Many hub nut tools are a very loose fit, mine is a Melco and was tight - that is very good , mine still has traces of Engineers Micrometer Blue from when I filed it to get a nice neat fit.  A neat fit is best to get the 'feel' of the first nut.

The only good tab washers to fold are genuine ones that are thin and of low grade material that folds easy.  Most cheap copy parts are too thick to start with.

Put damage down to DIY / nil proper training - a machine tool fitter would never leave his name & address , he would soon be found and sacked.

Your hub end-caps will be LWT specific , flat with stud for half-shaft , these axles had oil lubricated hubs, a smear of bearing grease is OK but I also spin the hub and get as much EP90 oil in as I can before quickly spinning the cap on.  The cap needs a proper thick 'O' ring , most copies sold are wrong size & totally useless, most claiming to be "genuine" are in fact wrong - possibly due to even the Army  61278 (May 1975) Illustrated Parts Catalogue being wrong,   561981 is correct. if  required - best go to a franchise dealership, £ high but will be what is needed , real ones do have a long life - even 50 + years !

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