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While jacking or lifting vehicles off the ground, what is acceptable to use to safely keep it up. I think house bricks, block paving, and Concrete breeze blocks are a definate NO. Bricks are generally slippy, block paving the same, and breeze blocks crumble and fracture. That leaves purpose built stands that have a load rating and the material of choice Wood/Lumber. Ideally a large piece at the base and the distance packed with graduated pieces to make the blocking stable as It has to withstand both vertical lateral and longtitudinal forces. I allways worked thinking what if I had to go to court and explain my actions because either Jane or Johny from next door had come around looking for their ball and the unthinkable had happend, the vehicle had slipped, could I justify my actions. Another thing to check when liffting wheeled vehicles is has the axle with the parking brake left the ground? I think it is always policy to chock the tyres to inhibit the vehicle rolling away. They stopped fitting rollers to skip wagons stabilizers years ago because when they were deployed the axle with the parking brake was sometimes lifted clear of the ground and the vehicle could and sometimes did run away. There is no point being fastidious with the repair and cavalier with safety. If it goes wrong someone has to come and clean up the mess. It takes less time to do a good job of blocking up a vehicle than either waiting for medical help or filling in a statement. Sorry to go on but sometimes a wake up is required, It is the time of year when vehicles are being woken from their winter of rest and readied for whatever. A lot of jacking is going to be undertaken do it safely and everyone will go home in one piece and happy.      

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We use 5ton axle stands when refurbing wheels on the sarry.

But ! the vehicle was picked up by a stacker front and back at the same time to keep it level.

Then lowered onto the stands. 

Sarry Jack.JPG

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Never rely on the jack alone, even a trolley jack. I found out that the hard way some years ago with a Land Rover. I'd fortunatley taken my head out of the wheel arch just before it went.  And it was right ^&*** to get it back up.

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If working on the vehicle with the wheels off, store them under the vehicle. This avoids falling over them and they will stop the vehicle falling to the ground if the unthinkable happens and the vehicle comes off the stands.

HGV's are another matter as the wheels are often too F'ing heavy and are easier left vertical to allow moving by rolling.

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Posted (edited)

Seen today not a motor vehicle but on theme and I thought interesting, Six and a half thousand tonnes jacked up

Jack leg Ship 004.JPG

Jack leg Ship 002.JPG

Edited by john1950

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Given that this thread appeared shortly after I posted this picture of the Tanker at the weekend,

20180325_123141.thumb.jpg.9ec059982daed78498b5111edbe767a2.jpg

I'll accept it as a slap, and deservedly so.  

But it was Sunday and I'd got a moody on because the wire for my other panels hadn't been delivered, and this job was getting done with whatever was to hand.  No excuse at all, really because I should, and do. know a lot better.  They are high density blocks, if that helps.

Having been schooled on the heavy plant of the Royal Engineers, it was drummed into us at Apprentice College.  "Always jack and pack" with seemingly endless lectures, demonstrations and practice on the subject.

Must use sound blocks of good heavy wood, soft light timber is no use , it will squash too easily.  The load needs to be crossways to the grain, never along the grain.  And blocks need to be stacked as headers and stretchers, that is at 90 degrees to each other. Most important, the ground underneath must able to take the weight. There's a whole load of other stuff too like chocking the other wheels, being on flat level ground etc.

The collective name for jacking blocks was "Dunnage" or "Dunnidge" depending on your regional accent.  Apparently it is a Navel term, I've never heard it used in civilian life.

As for the Tanker, it should get it's wheels back on this weekend, and be all safe again.

 

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Jack leg Ship 004.JPG

At first glance, it looks like the whole thing is being held up by that single rope from the crane!

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Posted (edited)
38 minutes ago, Zero-Five-Two said:

Given that this thread appeared shortly after I posted this picture of the Tanker at the weekend,

20180325_123141.thumb.jpg.9ec059982daed78498b5111edbe767a2.jpg

I'll accept it as a slap, and deservedly so.  

But it was Sunday and I'd got a moody on because the wire for my other panels hadn't been delivered, and this job was getting done with whatever was to hand.  No excuse at all, really because I should, and do. know a lot better.  They are high density blocks, if that helps.

Having been schooled on the heavy plant of the Royal Engineers, it was drummed into us at Apprentice College.  "Always jack and pack" with seemingly endless lectures, demonstrations and practice on the subject.

Must use sound blocks of good heavy wood, soft light timber is no use , it will squash too easily.  The load needs to be crossways to the grain, never along the grain.  And blocks need to be stacked as headers and stretchers, that is at 90 degrees to each other. Most important, the ground underneath must able to take the weight. There's a whole load of other stuff too like chocking the other wheels, being on flat level ground etc.

The collective name for jacking blocks was "Dunnage" or "Dunnidge" depending on your regional accent.  Apparently it is a Navel term, I've never heard it used in civilian life.

As for the Tanker, it should get it's wheels back on this weekend, and be all safe again.

 

I deliberately started a new thread so as not to point the finger at anyone. I thought it was a topic worthy of discussion Dunnage is used in shipping to block between cargo to stop damage,the same in transport it is used to keep items apart sometimes it is inflatable between cylinders or fluid tanks, ie brewery drays. Stay safe.

Edited by john1950
finish

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Thats Forum spirit. Did you see that Mk milli on ebay the other day looked tidy.

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Yes, it's a scam that one, keeps appearing then gets taken down. There's a whole load of motors by the same seller.

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I see. On the lighter side. I have not been the same fitter since someone stole my 28lb mell. Never felt as if I was hitting things hard enough, so I am just a spectator now.

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13 hours ago, john1950 said:

The collective name for jacking blocks was "Dunnage" or "Dunnidge" depending on your regional accent.  Apparently it is a Navel term, I've never heard it used in civilian life.

Definition  from the Oxford English Dictionary:-

Loose wood, matting, or similar material used to keep a cargo in position in a ship's hold.

Dated, informal A person's belongings, especially those brought on board ship.
 
 
belongings, possessions, stuff, property, worldly goods, goods, personal effects, effects, paraphernalia, impedimenta, bits and pieces, bits and bobs
Origin:-

Middle English: of unknown origin

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17 hours ago, Zero-Five-Two said:

Jack leg Ship 004.JPG

At first glance, it looks like the whole thing is being held up by that single rope from the crane!

Yes, but the crane is up there on the deck. They have been using it up there as well.

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If you only have access to small pieces of timber, I have found it practical to sandwich them between plywood. You can make them to a convenient size and they are light for getting into place. I have used these two for about 30 years and they are still good. You can nail, screw or glue them together.

Wood blocks 001.JPG

Wood blocks 002.JPG

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On 28/03/2018 at 6:47 AM, Longen said:

If working on the vehicle with the wheels off, store them under the vehicle. This avoids falling over them and they will stop the vehicle falling to the ground if the unthinkable happens and the vehicle comes off the stands.

HGV's are another matter as the wheels are often too F'ing heavy and are easier left vertical to allow moving by rolling.

Storeing verticaly is not recomended without restraints. A few years ago a youngster was playing in a haulage yard not far away from here and pulled a truck tyre over on himself with catostrophic results.

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A reminder of what the results can be when even a relatively light vehicle falls of a jack:-

 

Ian L    10

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All of that work was done in November / early December, then I did this which stopped play for 4 weeks. Crushed both hands under a trailer which fell off a jack.

x1.jpg

x2.jpg

x3.jpg

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I missed the original post. Yes, looks very painfull and at least 3 months out of his life with no manual work possible. It is very easy to have a narrow escape, laugh about it and not learn untill you are not quite quick enough. I am puzzled that he seems to have two left hands with different damage though !

David

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On 28/03/2018 at 8:44 PM, Zero-Five-Two said:

Jack leg Ship 004.JPG

At first glance, it looks like the whole thing is being held up by that single rope from the crane!

Going off at a tangent - wondered what this jack up was used for....

https://www.marinetraffic.com/en/photos/of/ships/shipid:459000/#forward

The individual legs have rack and pinion drives - either hydraulically or electrically powered.

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One has come down from a job in the Firth of Forth, joining its sister. I think they have been doing off shore wind farm work.

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18 hours ago, David Herbert said:

I am puzzled that he seems to have two left hands with different damage though !

Well spotted.

It might be that the third photo was taken soon after the accident and the others as his hand started to heal.

As Ian L doesn't like the new forum, I don't know if he will read your and my posts and then explain his "two left hands".

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