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Normandy 2014

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The reason BSA M20's spares are more easily available is because they used to break down that often

they had to keep plenty of spares on the shelf

Now a Norton 16H is a quality piece of kit

Commander

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The reason BSA M20's spares are more easily available is because they used to break down that often

they had to keep plenty of spares on the shelf

Now a Norton 16H is a quality piece of kit

Commander

 

 

The reason there is still a lot of M20 parts around is due to the Army retaining the BSA and Matchless machines and keeping them in military service for another 15 to 20 years. ;)

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Perfect Ron and stunning bike you have there.

 

I passed my bike license when I was 17 and used to ride big bikes but decided to get off them when the family arrived :angel: Have been looking at a bike for a while but ££££ is getting in the way but next year is the year of the Mans Bike and think its about time the British were as represented as the Yanks.

 

GAME ON.

 

 

Now I thought you were a 'Yank lover' I'm impressed :) and as you said its Game On

 

 

Not anti Yank would prefer the British side to be bigged up by the press and the general public and then the re-enactors here endeth the lesson from the grumpy one

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I was told that a Matchless was a mans bike?

 

It might be a mans bike(only might) but it is a pig to work on. Nortons (of any era) are vastly overated and the honestly sold ones come with a pair of rose tinted spectacles. If ease of acquisition, ownership and usage are the prime points then BSA M20 is the way to go. But as with any ex-wd stuff dont expect it to be cheap and if you are doing any resto work yourself dont believe anyone who says a bike is easier to do than a larger vehicle - they obviously have never done a bike! The Ariels and Triumphs are fine but are much thinner on the ground and will be less easy to acquire a good one at a decent price. The RAF had Indians, but that is really getting in to the realms of the rare and exotic.

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Yes the RAF did use quite a few India 741's. In fact lots were supplied to the allies under the lend lease scheme but they were mainly issued to the lower echelon units as they were not well liked by our blokes.

I have most makes in my collection and I seem to like different aspects and features of all of them.

I love the antique look of the 16H and I would say that it a slightly faster bike than an M20. The Triumphs are light and lively with lovely gear box's. The Matchless's again are very lively with quite nice box's but some of the design features leave me speechless. The Velo's are just quirky and hand built and very sporty once you have them set up correctly. The Ariel is a very good all round bike with every thing more or less as you'd want it. Royal Enfield's seem very under rated. I really like riding my CO especially for convoy work, however the gearbox is not my favourite.

For sheer durability and reliability you'd have to go a long way to beat an M20, however they would be better if fitted with a Triumph gear box and clutch.

I also personally prefer a gear driven magneto as opposed to a flaying chain.

 

Finally I never go for a ride on my Indian......I always go for a wobble!! Ron

741B 005.jpg

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Having owned and ridden most wartime WD bikes for the last 30+ years, at certain points as my only transport, I'm a tad on the fence about what's better.......at the end of the day they all have their good and bad points, and peculiarities between 'em......

 

No bike is really more reliable or durable than any other.....even the best restoration can go pear-shaped at the most inconvenient moment......M20's are tough and most spares easy to source, but they are a bit of a lump, and Matchless's equally good but a pain to work on, especially if the dynamo buggers up......nowadays, I've settled on a Norton 16H and Ariel W/NG for my limited pleasure usage, and both have proven arguably efficient and fun with no significant issues......comfort-wise, I like the Ariel, but for speed and fun I prefer the 16H, the latter a beautiful starter on fuel that's often over a year old........

 

But I also used a Royal Enfield Model C as my daily transport for years......not at all quick but very reliable and comfy......trouble was, I thrashed the thing and forgot my daily maintenance routine, resulting in the conrod shearing at 55mph, taking out most of the engine internals with it...........luckily, I had a spare unit under the bench and was back on the road within a week.......:-D

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Excellent to see the debate on 2014 hotting up already ....Planning to be there and if possible taking both the Jeep and triumph 3SW ...Hoping that the friendly insurers can be pursuaded to allow my 17 year old to drive the Triumph and jeep to allow us to move them both around .....

 

 

Jenkinov

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I might drag the old 16H over in 2014 the last time was in 1994 when bikes were few and far apart

that's if the old bones can stand it lol

Commander

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I would like to take my Royal Enfield WD. C.O. 350cc 1942, its the last bike that I (with considerable help from my friend Steve) restored, and she runs like a dream, very reliable.............. the bikes not the issue, I am considerably older than the bike, and not in such good condition........ fingers crossed.

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Have been offered a very nice Matchless - but its in civvy colours :banghead:

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Have been offered a very nice Matchless - but its in civvy colours :banghead:

 

You have got two years to paint it green ........ should be plenty of time ;)

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Have been offered a very nice Matchless - but its in civvy colours :banghead:

 

Jack, send me the frame and engine numbers before you buy it. Some pictures would be good also.

 

Ron

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Jack, send me the frame and engine numbers before you buy it. Some pictures would be good also.

 

Ron

 

Thanks Ron - have some images and have asked for the numbers :)

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Mrs Madden has assured me that we ARE going over for the 70th (yes dear....:undecided:)........you can't miss her (well, you can, at only 4'10")....but not her London gob........(yes dear.....:D)..........(I will be the quiet, humble 6'4" bloke on a 16H)......

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Mrs Madden has assured me that we ARE going over for the 70th (yes dear....:undecided:)........you can't miss her (well, you can, at only 4'10")....but not her London gob........(yes dear.....:D)..........(I will be the quiet, humble 6'4" bloke on a 16H)......

 

That'll be good Steve. A nice little wrens outfit would fit the bill for Vee. You know the ones that have to be hitched up to expose the stocking tops when climbing on board.

Does she know about the camping malarkey? The excitements in tents!!

 

Ron

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I confess to having a particular liking for the G3L - admittedly it's a pig to get at things, and the engineering can seem occasionally perverse, but that's also why it's such a beautifully compact bike. Ground clearance is very rarely an issue, especially with the tucked in exhaust pipe, and the tele forks make it the most comfortable to ride. Add a pair of H.L. cams and an extra tooth on the engine sprocket and it can be reasonably quick as well, with handling to match. It's true that they need setting up with care, but then again don't they all? The Triumph is probably the best of them all on the road, but the mud in Americas field on Thursday saw the 3HW surfing along on it's bash plate with very little in the way of foreward motion. I suppose that the Ariel would be first choice in conditions like that seeing as it really is a trials iron, but I've heard it said that it can get a bit fidgety on the road at speed.

In the end it just comes down to personal preferences and availability - they're all good'uns, and sheparding a convoy is an absolute hoot.

Jack, it was great to meet, and the invitation stands :)

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That'll be good Steve. A nice little wrens outfit would fit the bill for Vee. You know the ones that have to be hitched up to expose the stocking tops when climbing on board.

Does she know about the camping malarkey? The excitements in tents!!

 

Ron

 

Vee has assured me that she has considerable previous experience in flashing her stocking tops....(they go rather nicely with her corset collection......:cool2:).........mind you, she did a spell in the Wren's (for real) in the 70's so I think that her ATS kit will get an airing at the 70th..........

 

She is also a "tent veteran" so no fears in that department...........:angel:

 

She has, however, advised that you pack a camping pacemaker....or better a defib' kit......apparently, it may be necessary......:-D

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I confess to having a particular liking for the G3L - admittedly it's a pig to get at things, and the engineering can seem occasionally perverse, but that's also why it's such a beautifully compact bike. Ground clearance is very rarely an issue, especially with the tucked in exhaust pipe, and the tele forks make it the most comfortable to ride. Add a pair of H.L. cams and an extra tooth on the engine sprocket and it can be reasonably quick as well, with handling to match. It's true that they need setting up with care, but then again don't they all? The Triumph is probably the best of them all on the road, but the mud in Americas field on Thursday saw the 3HW surfing along on it's bash plate with very little in the way of foreward motion. I suppose that the Ariel would be first choice in conditions like that seeing as it really is a trials iron, but I've heard it said that it can get a bit fidgety on the road at speed.

In the end it just comes down to personal preferences and availability - they're all good'uns, and sheparding a convoy is an absolute hoot.

Jack, it was great to meet, and the invitation stands :)

 

Ariel's, and Nortons, have some good ground clearance on them....both having allegedly "competition" frames......perhaps the worst offender for ground clearance is the M20, which coupled with the weight can make it a bit of a pig on soft, muddy ground.....

 

Ariel's are not at all fidgety at speed in my experience, unless the fork bushes, springs and head bearings are shot......both Norton's, Ariel's and later Royal Enfield CO's have additional side check-springs on the forks that assist with rigidity and undue flexing and hold a perfect line........though it's fair to say that as with anything, setting up correctly, wear and maintenance all play a part in any bike's handling.......

 

Another factor with Ariel's and Norton's is the one-piece frame, reducing the flexing that you can get with two-piece assemblies with worn bolt holes, etc.........:-)

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Hi all,

 

I am planning to bring an R12 over for Normandy 2014 (if the engine is back together by then), but being a soft southerner would look for a hotel. I understand all the ferry bookings have been taken by now to Normandy so I'll drive down in a van ("What? It made it all the way to Russia but won't ride to Normandy? or It got to Normandy last time in '44 and look at the way the British treated it).

 

John

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John you are perfectly free to bring your German bike to Normandy. But our tour and Guinness world record run is strictly for Allied forces motorcycles.

We did have a guy on a German outfit who turned up on the 65th Guinness run, who tacked himself on the end of the row of bikes and refused to budge. He risked jeopardising our event and we had to make it clear to the Guinness organisation that he wasn't included in our final number of 143 bikes.

 

Regards Ron (main organiser 2014 DR tour)

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Many thanks,

 

That would be great Ron. Of course I wouldn't put the terrific achievement at risk by doing that. There aren't many axis bike owners in the UK and some are a bit, well I'm sure you know what I mean.

 

I'll keep an eye on the Forum and update you with progress on the R12's. I'm sure at least one will be road worthy by then.

 

Regards

 

John

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Hi again John. After re reading your last post, I think you may have misunderstood my comments. When I said you are free to bring your BM to Normandy.....I meant just that! After all, 'It's a free country'... But our tour and ride outs are strictly for Allied forces machines. It's all in the original booking on information. Ron

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Chris all the information is on this forum in the first 4-5 sticky posts.

http://pub37.bravenet.com/forum/static/show.php?usernum=3155626639&frmid=16&cmd=show

But email shaef2014@gmail.com for an entry form.

But please be aware that I will be closing entries at the end of this month, by which time I will have to produce final numbers to the camp site.

 

Regards Ron

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