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handy1882

Vulcan VSW 30cwt 6x4.

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Hi All,

Bit of an odd question for you all!

 

Internal engine paint: has anyone ever used it?

 

I’m starting to work on the Vulcans engine, the crankcase is a large aluminium casting which is painted internally in a kind of beige paint/varnish which is tough as old boots to clean off. A lot of it is already off anyway where the engine has been in bits for years and corrosion has got underneath the coating.

I’ve done some research and apparently it was used to seal the aluminium to stop oil soaking in to the very porous casting and also to stop muck coming back out of it.

Has anyone come across this before? And if so has anyone ever replaced this coating?

Have you cleaned it off and regretted it later as oilstarted seeping through your casting?

 

I’ve found some of this stuff, Glyptal, which is used to smooth uprough castings and make the oil get back to the sump faster…. Can’t really seethe point of that, but it would probably work well for the purpose of sealingup porosity. Pricey…

http://www.frost.co.uk/glyptal-red-enamel-946ml-us-quart.html

 

I’ve seen this sort of stuff in tractor gearboxes andengines and seem to remember it being in a Triumph car engine that I restored. It’s that thin coating of red oxide looking stuff that is hard to get off.

 

What are people’s thoughts on this? Seems a strange thing to do to slop paint around inside an engine…

There is some electrical coil insulation paint on our favourite auction site which looks the same and is heat, oil and acid proof so would probably do the job, I’ve ordered a small bit of this as a tester to see what it comes out like.

Edited by handy1882
sausage fingers.

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Internal engine paint: has anyone ever used it?

 

I can't answer the question directly, but I do know that my dad's former employer _always_ painted the insides of their gearboxes.

I can see good arguments for painting any surface that might rust, and I think that is why gearboxes get painted.

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That has come up before on here in the Thorny thread, where I mentioned Castingite in Glasgow;

 

http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/showthread.php?13514-WW1-Thornycroft-restoration&p=317479&highlight=castingite+glasgow#post317479

 

They did resin impregnation of castings under pressure to prevent porosity being a problem over time. I recall ( red? ) Glyptal paint being used for acid-resist on some American stuff too, like the battery trays on the DUKWs.

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Glyptal was originally, AIUI, intended for motor windings or some similar purpose; but has been used fairly often on the inside of engines and the like because it seals up the castings, helps oil drain back quicker, yadda yadda.

 

Preparation of the surfaces being treated is key, though, if you don't want to risk it flaking off and potentially blocking oil passageways. (It also needs time to 'set', if it's not being baked on, IIRC.)

 

There's a bloke on YouTube who went through the whole thing, though in something significantly newer than being discussed here. :-D

(Application video here, but there's ones before that covering the extensive prep work:

)

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A friend did pearl blast his aluminium engine. It stopt leaking oil but it didn't look nice. Engine looked rough like sandblasted but it was smooth to the toutch...

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Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I'll probably leave the crank case as it is and hope for the best. It doesn't seem too porous, if it starts to show problems in service I'll have to have a rethink.

The sump however is a different matter. It is also an aluminium casting, but looks like it has been dropped/jacked upon/pushed about etc.. and has a few small cracks in it, I think I may give it a thorough degrease and apply some glyptal to these areas to seal it up, unless anyone else has any good ideas? Unfortunately the material does not respond well to welding...

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Thanks for the replies everyone. I think I'll probably leave the crank case as it is and hope for the best. It doesn't seem too porous, if it starts to show problems in service I'll have to have a rethink.

The sump however is a different matter. It is also an aluminium casting, but looks like it has been dropped/jacked upon/pushed about etc.. and has a few small cracks in it, I think I may give it a thorough degrease and apply some glyptal to these areas to seal it up, unless anyone else has any good ideas? Unfortunately the material does not respond well to welding...

 

Morning Rob, There used to be a product on the market called if I remember correctly JB weld it was an epoxy/Aluminium compound for repairing broken and cracked castings I used it some years ago to repair a motor bike casting with good results I found the best results were obtained if the crack was opened out a little with a needle file to to provide a decent key.

 

Pete

Edited by Pete Ashby
spelling

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Hi Pete,

 

Thanks, that stuff should do the job. It's a sand casting so should have a decent enough key already, bit more roughing wouldn't do any harm though.

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A few more bits and pieces done. The main prop shaft was overhauled in the same way as the axle drive shaft a few pages back. The joints were in quite good condition once they were cleaned up.

 

 

 

CA5818DE-BDFA-4749-998D-3E4C3BACE195_zpstls8sjvh.jpg

 

 

6DE210EF-1700-4A6F-80C9-21DFB833BF15_zpssernryz4.jpg

 

 

8931DBC9-DEE2-4CC0-98A3-B52B037AA518_zpsfjw3nqdn.jpg

 

FB7EA582-DCB3-49AB-A363-1D83690660A2_zps7kcsx2oq.jpg

 

FC93A6C8-6685-4A9D-B907-31E7ED4B2AF6_zpsv8h07mlx.jpg

 

58E6201C-4E0F-4616-B953-35D62AD2E0C9_zps20c2lfmx.jpg

 

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The cap head is just for assembly purposes.

 

8C76F75B-F72E-490E-8E22-B92938B9F747_zps2u7nqcpa.jpg

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The manifolds have been done. The exhaust manifold is in quite good condition just requiring a good sandblast and heatproof paint.

The inlet manifold had a large hole in it, luckily I had the hole to fill it back in with. it was sifbronzed back in to place (Thank you once again Dad!)

 

9784E25E-9EAE-4AE9-9CCE-CE40D04876E3_zpsldpj8ys8.jpg?t=1490947110

 

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57769292-26CA-4755-ABE5-96D965C8C536_zpsucd2aadf.jpg

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The carburetor has also been done. It is a Zenith 30 HZ which was fitted to a lot of different vehicles such as the Austin 12/4 etc, however the Vulcan one is a slightly rarer version as is it left handed compared to the more available Austin version.

It was seized completely solid and has been having a soak in WD40 since i started the project.The large air intake looks to be a later modification, and the right angle bronze casting does not really match the carb.

 

SAM_0694.jpg

 

SAM_0695.jpg

 

SAM_0697.jpg

 

SAM_0698.jpg

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It all came apart with a lot of very gentle heating and tapping. The aluminium insert was nearly completely rotted away, I'm sure there is a clever name for this bit..

 

270DEE02-1F28-45FD-9E3C-4D69C56B7CFB_zpsog1cnnv5.jpg

 

I machined up a new one.

 

8964A146-E968-49C6-9648-D6B7124A4351_zpsvaympmh8.jpg

 

also machined a new butterfly shaft and main jet.

 

00175A8B-51B0-459C-A21B-38C515C61ACF_zps3k8lmzsf.jpg?t=1490948854

 

The inlet filter was a but worn,

 

D35A0DFE-B656-4A46-B952-FBD6B2D30B60_zpsvcjrs5j6.jpg

 

1FD502C4-57CA-4C30-A6FE-0FA801D20D5D_zpsuvfx0b0m.jpg

 

I managed to get it apart and fit a new filter mesh.

 

9D86C846-5584-45D4-AF3D-B972C61012A7_zpspcfhf0zu.jpg

 

D35C705B-09FF-4F29-A588-729DC1F55693_zpsuyzmo2pr.jpg

 

The float had a few small holes, so i soldered these up.

 

01C91166-C0FA-4156-8BCD-0757FE0FEBBA_zpscaj1p8c8.jpg

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I managed to find an old Austin carb that still had the correct choke assembly on, this fitted straight on.

All ready to fit one day...

 

4F07F5EE-870E-46FB-9933-7EF6038FFBE7_zps8bigzhik.jpg?t=1490949587

 

39F8DDAD-0077-4E13-B477-286E37B7E632_zps7tipseeg.jpg

 

D7D9303D-FA05-4CCC-B27A-2ABF71D45710_zpswdl8m2zz.jpg

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Excellent work Rob real craftsmanship

keep the up dates coming it's really good to see this truck coming back to life. I first saw it more years ago than I care to remember when Keith and Roy first had it. It's been a long time waiting for someone like you to come along.

 

Pete

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Hi Pete,

 

Thank you very much for your kind comments. Hopefully you will see it in one piece someday, its been it bits for a long time. I think Pete and Roy bought it sometime in the late 70's.

 

It certainly given me a huge appreciation for the amount of work that goes in to other peoples restorations.

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Hi all,

Just to keep in touch, the Vulcan is still progressing, but at a much slower rate. 

My wife and I bought a house (pile of bricks with a door knob on!) that needed a complete renovation, so have spent over a year getting it habitable, it still needs finishing, but we are in. Also we have had a baby girl who is now 6 months old, so as you can guess I've had to put the Vulcan on the back burner for a little while. However the house did come with a double garage and a rather nice workshop which will more than happily accommodate an assembled Vulcan plus other clutter.... 

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Thanks Tim. 

At the last house, I had spare time but no space, now I have space but spare time is at a premium! 

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