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'43 Royal Enfield WD/CO - horn mounting positions / kill switch


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Hi All,

Just wondered if anyone can give me a steer as to where they have mounted the horn on their bike?

Due to the thickness of the mounting bracket and its shape I am struggling to get it to fit towards the front of the bike. I've looked at fitting it to the engine case but it projects forwards and tends to interfere with the front mudguard.

Also, does anyone have a kill switch/immobiliser type switch fitted to their bike? I am interested to know what are where fitted, just keen to know the bike is safe whilst unattended.

Your advice would be very much appreciated.

Thanks,

MartinDSC_0454.thumb.JPG.f41d940aa955c31a991438ae4247eda5.JPG

DSC_0453.JPG

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Hi Ron,

Thanks for the picture. I can't see how this is achieved? Either the bracket is different to mine, or there's something I'm missing. I've attached a couple of pics to show what I mean. The nut at the 12 o'clock position prevents vertical mounting, as does the shape of the crankcase.

Martin

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Martin you need a longer front engine stud with a spacer about 1" long. You can make it out in this engine rebuild picture. 

 

Ron

CO 097.JPG

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Hi 

I'm terms of bike security I would recommend a silver or gold quality bike chain and padlock . Through the frame and into a lamp post...but as Ron points out best to keep them in sight ...you can cover the modern chain with canvas. The wiring can be temperamental enough without adding a kill switch

Jenkinov

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Martin you need parts 13 and 16 from Hitchcocks the nuts are 14 if you need them.

https://www.hitchcocksmotorcycles.com/partsbook-pages/919

Chaining your bike to a post or even through the back wheel so it can't be rolled away is a good idea. But there are so many valuable parts that can easily be removed, that I get nervous when out of site, or as a group, we always leave someone on guard. Imagine losing your original pannier bags or speedo head which can be removed in minutes. My mate Ian came back to his bike after a loan supermarket shop in France to find that someone had pulled his canvas grips off, leaving only the inboard brass rings. So both Ian and the thief had nothing useful. Ron

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Thank you both,

I have previously purchased locks etc to secure to something immovable, I was just interested to know if anyone had done anything different. I have read about a switch under the saddle, but it wasn't clear what exactly the purpose of this was?

Ron, thanks you for your help, I had a suspicion that might be the case. How much easier would things be if Royal Enfield at the time had made exploded diagrams!

Thanks,

Martin

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Yeah and what a faff to remove it and still someone could wheel your bike into a van in a few seconds. I have them just for show☺️  Ron

WDL-G 118.JPG

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No casual tea-leaf is going to be able to walk up and start a bike of this era. ignition left on full advance and fuel off should be enough. A chain around the rear wheel and frame will stop someone from walking up in bike gear and riding off on it...professionals with a van who go equipped to steal will remain a problem whatever you do.

It doesn't look by the way as if the OP is doing a WD rebuild, but in case it's important, the Altette shown is a post-war aftermarket civilian version. (cutaway body, aluminium branded bezel and acorn nuts).

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I think it's is an original horn Rik. But as you say post war. I've seen them on Taff's site with the cutaway body and cast monkey metal rim. Ron

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Indeed Ron. Taff said that those fitted as original equipment by the manufacturers didn't have the Lucas markings cast in, but those supplied as replacements did....I think this held true for the major firms, but some of the smaller outfits seem to have purchased from wholesalers rather than direct.

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I have been undertaking more of a preservation rather than a restoration since I brought the bike back from Belgium.

It's been surprising quite how many small things were missing and perished and have had to be replaced. Still looking for a rear stand though!

I've undertaken a thorough clean and removal of loose paintwork, whilst treating the rust and preserving as much as possible the layers of paint, it has several areas of green, plenty of the black that it was refurbished in after the war, as well as some small areas of blue etc that it acquired in the last 70 odd years.

There are some replacement parts that it has acquired over the years too, but these are small and incidental such as the rear brake light, but I've decided to keep these. I like the overall story the bike has to tell.

I didn't realise that the horn was a replacement though so that's something else learned. I have found that everyday is a lesson with these bikes which I love.

I have to ask as its a new name to me, who is Taff?

Thanks all,

Martin

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Taff's website is still up and running, although Taff is in poor health after having suffered a stroke, and will no longer be able to operate his business/hobby again.

 I'm in contact with the guy in his village who is helping him out by selling some of his stock. He sent me 10 unrestored horns to move on. Taff has indicated that he want's the website left running, for the information he has collated.

The Lucas Altette models are quite vast and complicated over their many years of changes. Here is a genuine war-time "HF1235" 

Martin are you intending to put the bike back into military trim? Have you contacted jan with the frame/engine numbers for his register?    Ron

Horn_restored_001.jpg

Horn_restored_002.jpg

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Hi Ron,

Jan has the numbers, he was extremely helpful and inspected the bike in Belgium fo me before I imported it back to the UK.

Ive chosen at this time to preserve rather than restore as my late father had a WD/CO in a similar condition.

Cheers,

Martin

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