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79x100

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Everything posted by 79x100

  1. 'RMG' was a Middlesex series exclusively issued to Government vehicles from about March 1939. It's not unique in having been disposed of still bearing it, but it's certainly not common and of course means that there hadn't been a wartime rebuild and loss of identity.
  2. 79x100

    Triumph 3TW

    It's all most confusing....You'll recall these articles that you copied, Mr. Rewdco ! 😃 There seem to have been two bikes at MEE in July 1940 and then both Graham Walker and Arthur Bourne were invited to test a machine in about February 1941 - allegedly the first from a pre-production batch of fifty. The both grovelled at the altar of Edward Turner....Bearing in mind though that the Triumph factory had been destroyed in the Coventry blitz of November 1940, I wonder if this talk of a new batch was simply propaganda ? Bert Hopwood (who thought the 3TW a dreadful thing) refers to the two initial bikes actually being pre-war civilian prototypes adapted for military use - the only bike photographed was ERW 947 which was a May 1939 Coventry series which might back this story up. Hopwood states quite categorically in 'Whatever Happened to the British Motorcycle Industry' that the fifty special 3TW machines were made and assembled and were packed in their cases on the loading deck of the Despatch Department on the night of the Coventry Blitz and were destroyed....."I still feel that, so far as the fifty specials were concerned, Hitler did our War Office a favour" 😁 He makes no mention of where the ten machines in December 1942 might have come from but this was about the time that they moved to Meriden from the temporary assembly plant in Warwick..
  3. There were no WD/COs in 1938....The first 'proper' WD contract COs were delivered in March 1942. Any 1938 Enfield would have had the larger pre-war civilian lettering.
  4. My dad worked at Woldingham spray-painting Caterpillars for the Groundnut Scheme. Were they orange ? I'll ask him. I'm sure that he doesn't have any photos though.
  5. Has anyone analysed the sequence of inspection stamps on Coventry Triumph engines ? The numbers were unique to an individual inspector and it may be possible to get an idea from when these 5S engines were inspected, based on the same stamp on WD serial-stamped 3SW engines such as this one.
  6. Does Mike say what colour the pre-war 'khaki' was ? Pre-war India Office Nortons were listed as 'khaki' when the War Office machines were 'Green' but then in 1939 when Khaki Green No.3 was introduced, they were suddenly described as 'Brown'....I suspect more of a 'Dried Mud' Khaki.
  7. Just a little bit of rivetery-countery and not of such import on a Matchless where the CVC box is slightly hidden, but WD MCR1s up until at least June 1942 were marked 'Lead-Acid' to differentiate them from the pre-war Ni-Fe boxes. On Nortons particularly where they're stuck out on the side, it's noticeable. Does yours still have the original internals, Steve ? If so, what is the date on the back plate ?
  8. Rubber didn't really become short until after the Japanese took Malaya in early 1942....There is a tendency to assume that 1944 spec was 'normal' but allowing for 1939 production during the build-up, pretty much half of wartime production was not subject to rubber shortages and a fair quantity of the vehicles that were went straight into post-war reserve stock which is why they were so common on the 1950s and '60s demob market. Lots of rubber bits is really far more 'warry' in terms of year served.
  9. Which model of Enfield are you restoring ? In practice, apart from use of the WD/C by the BEF and by some second-line units in the Middle East, it is hard to find evidence of their use by the British Army overseas. Italy was a campaign that saw M20s, W/NGs, 3HWs and G3Ls with the British and 16Hs with the Canadians. In terms of markings, as early as the Army Council Instruction 'Vehicle Markings 1941', published in January of that year, it was stated that formation signs would not be applied to motorcycles and this was repeated in each subsequent publication. The most correct choice would probably be simply the arm of service marking on each side of the fuel tank.
  10. The heavyweight Webb forks and the style of the headsteady clamp really look Triumph...The 'three stay' plunger rear-end is unfamiliar to me..I suspect that it is a 1940s suspension upgrade. I'd say that it was pre-war Tiger 100 with upgrades but that the fuel tank doesn't belong on it
  11. The 24w/24w non-focussed bulbs in motorcycle headlamps most certainly didn't have 'e' marks...neither does a 'Difusa' glass.
  12. Sadly, there is a large-scale fraud going on with a number of Indian eBay sellers....Jan posed as a buyer on another group. It appears to be common practice to photograph a genuine item and then sell poor quality look-alikes. Presumably they hope that feedback will be left before the buyers find out that things don't fit.
  13. Matchlesses and no two alike ? Who'd have thought it ? ðŸĪŠ
  14. Lucas lists are supremely unhelpful and confusing. I believe that this first one is from 1939. The earlier 1936 list shows one with a black bezel, but only the 6-0-6 ML that they took over with all the Maglita stuff in the early thirties. It looks as if you should have the 369, 075 which was the BM4 L15 with an upright needle and illumination at 6 o'clock. It had a chromium plated bezel. Whatever, if you paid more than 8/6d then you were had !
  15. Sorry to chime in late. Gas paint really shouldn't be too carefully applied. They simply slapped it on. Mine had quite a small area but with very visible brush strokes. I got it wrong though as I put the panel on afterwards.
  16. Indeed Ron. Taff said that those fitted as original equipment by the manufacturers didn't have the Lucas markings cast in, but those supplied as replacements did....I think this held true for the major firms, but some of the smaller outfits seem to have purchased from wholesalers rather than direct.
  17. No casual tea-leaf is going to be able to walk up and start a bike of this era. ignition left on full advance and fuel off should be enough. A chain around the rear wheel and frame will stop someone from walking up in bike gear and riding off on it...professionals with a van who go equipped to steal will remain a problem whatever you do. It doesn't look by the way as if the OP is doing a WD rebuild, but in case it's important, the Altette shown is a post-war aftermarket civilian version. (cutaway body, aluminium branded bezel and acorn nuts).
  18. 57% is the recommendation from now on then ?
  19. Where was the misalignment then Ron ? The mainshaft in the flywheel or was the wheel out of true ?
  20. It may be the case that the cover and screw changed over time. I'm still discovering 'Early' and 'Late' versions of components on Nortons, with little visible difference but they were constantly looking for economies of material.
  21. The red-painted head is so difficult to look at, with that flicking image....Has it perhaps been skimmed ? As Ron says, it's normal to have some combustion chamber above the piston.
  22. I've seen suggestions that Norton SV and OHV were balanced to 50% pre-war but with figures approaching 70% for the OHC racers which of course do most of their work at much higher revs. Even frame rigidity has an effect though. What's it at, at the moment ?
  23. Do you know what he balance factor was intended to be on CO cranks, Ron ? I see widely differing figures suggested for Nortons.
  24. 79x100

    '67'...??

    I don't have a copy of the 1941 booklet...Only the 'Home Forces' lists and that doesn't mention Armoured Divisions which is odd. Wally, do you have any ACIs relating to BEF markings...especially the later arrivals ?
  25. 79x100

    '67'...??

    '67' on red doesn't appear on any wartime schedule that I can find. '67' on brown or black does, but without a formation sign (and motorcycles didn't officially display them after 1941) it is impossible to pin down. If it's shiny then the odd are that a private owner applied it and quite possibly made an error....or maybe based it on what an old soldier said.
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