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Dodge WC 214 tappet adjustment


STRIKE AND RETURN 460
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Are the tappets noisy? if the engine is running quiet and no tappets clacking probably best left alone, its a bit of a fiddly job especially the tappets behind the end of exhaust manifold.

To access the tappets you need to remove the right front wheel and remove the inner wing splash panel to access the engine side plates, you will need new cork gaskets when re fitting the two side plates. The engine should be at running temperature, best to follow the procedure as in the manual, remove the spark plugs too it makes it easier to turn the engine over, its then a standard procedure, work on opposite valves, ie ..if the 3rd valve from the right is fully open check the clearance on the 3rd valve in from the left, and so on, mark them with chalk as you go shows which ones are done

Edited by Nick Johns
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Are the tappets noisy? if the engine is running quiet and no tappets clacking probably best left alone, its a bit of a fiddly job especially the tappets behind the end of exhaust manifold.

To access the tappets you need to remove the right front wheel and remove the inner wing splash panel to access the engine side plates, you will need new cork gaskets when re fitting the two side plates. The engine should be at running temperature, best to follow the procedure as in the manual, remove the spark plugs too it makes it easier to turn the engine over, its then a standard procedure, work on opposite valves, ie ..if the 3rd valve from the right is fully open check the clearance on the 3rd valve in from the left, and so on, mark them with chalk as you go shows which ones are done

 

Thank you Nick,

yes they are noisy and I feel they do need adjusting. Would you be able to confirm the complete sequence for starting to adjust or otherwise I know I get them all out of sequence and they will be all over the show.

The Dodge manual states 0.010 will not go between the valve stem and adjusting screw but a 0.012 will. So is it best to set intake and exhaust to 0.012 ?

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A friend quoted setting them up at 0.014" when cold and it should sit nicely at 0.012" when warm, haven't tried it but when I put the engine back together it's the way I'm going to try.

 

Steve

 

Thanks Steve,

I am thinking about adjusting them with the engine running, that way I cannot get them out of sequence :laugh:

well that's the plan.

regards

Ken

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I have never done them on a WC but I have a Kew-built Dodge Fire Engine with the same (virtually) engine. The manual says 14 thou for both inlet and exhaust cold and that's what mine were set at. If you fancy doing it running you might want to invest in some asbestos wrists as it will be a bit warm. Actually I am not sure it can be done running as things will be moving a bit too much to get a spanner on.

 

I also recall 3 hands are needed - two for the two spanners (the locknut and the adjusting nut) and one for the feeler gauge, unless, of course, the military engines are wildly different from the civvy ones. For normal humans expect to be bending down picking the feeler gauge off the deck a few times!

 

The perceived wisdom with these things is a rule of 12 (adjust valve 1 when valve 12 is fully open etc) but with a flathead (sidevalve) things are much easier. Find TDC on the compression stroke for any cylinder (although No1 is a good place to start). You know it is at the top of the compression stroke when the piston is at the top (either check the timing mark or gently pop a wire into the plug hole) and the rotor arm will be pointing at the pluglead segment in the distributor cap corresponding to that particular cylinder.

 

At that point both inlet and exhaust valves for that cylinder are both fully closed and so you can do both clearances for that cylinder. Turn the engine through one complete turn and move on to the next cylinder in the firing order. A quick check of piston and rotor just to make sure that you got it right and then another two valves etc etc etc.

 

If any clearances are huge suspect a stuck valve.

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I have never done them on a WC but I have a Kew-built Dodge Fire Engine with the same (virtually) engine. The manual says 14 thou for both inlet and exhaust cold and that's what mine were set at. If you fancy doing it running you might want to invest in some asbestos wrists as it will be a bit warm. Actually I am not sure it can be done running as things will be moving a bit too much to get a spanner on.

 

I also recall 3 hands are needed - two for the two spanners (the locknut and the adjusting nut) and one for the feeler gauge, unless, of course, the military engines are wildly different from the civvy ones. For normal humans expect to be bending down picking the feeler gauge off the deck a few times!

 

The perceived wisdom with these things is a rule of 12 (adjust valve 1 when valve 12 is fully open etc) but with a flathead (sidevalve) things are much easier. Find TDC on the compression stroke for any cylinder (although No1 is a good place to start). You know it is at the top of the compression stroke when the piston is at the top (either check the timing mark or gently pop a wire into the plug hole) and the rotor arm will be pointing at the pluglead segment in the distributor cap corresponding to that particular cylinder.

 

At that point both inlet and exhaust valves for that cylinder are both fully closed and so you can do both clearances for that cylinder. Turn the engine through one complete turn and move on to the next cylinder in the firing order. A quick check of piston and rotor just to make sure that you got it right and then another two valves etc etc etc.

 

If any clearances are huge suspect a stuck valve.

 

Thanks Paul for your detailed reply, and yes I have changed my mind about BBQ myself on the manifold !:red::red:

can you just confirm the rule of 12 from start to finish so I can't go wrong.

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I seriously would not bother with the rule of 12 but the idea is that you imagine a line across the engine between No3 and No4 cylinders and when one valve on one side of the line is right up (its a sidevalve remember) then you adjust the corresponding valve at the other end of the engine: so adjust valve No 12 when No1 is right up, 11 when 2 is right up etc etc etc.

 

I always forget where I am up to and besides, working out exactly when a valve is at its highest point can be tricky - not too bad on an OHV engine where you can see clearly, but a bit of a guess when you are peering into a gloomy oily valve chest hidden behind a manifold.

 

Go for TDC (compression) - much easier and most likely much more effective!

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I seriously would not bother with the rule of 12 but the idea is that you imagine a line across the engine between No3 and No4 cylinders and when one valve on one side of the line is right up (its a sidevalve remember) then you adjust the corresponding valve at the other end of the engine: so adjust valve No 12 when No1 is right up, 11 when 2 is right up etc etc etc.!

I did actually describe this procedure in my answer right at the start of this thread !

Edited by Nick Johns
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