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As I said, I don't know much about it. I'll be able to have a look over the weekend and get some photos. Hopefully the hatches aren't too hard to open :)

 

Any idea where I should be looking for build plates and other info?

 

Cheers,

Terry

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As I said, I don't know much about it. I'll be able to have a look over the weekend and get some photos. Hopefully the hatches aren't too hard to open :)

 

Any idea where I should be looking for build plates and other info?

 

Cheers,

Terry

 

The makers plate is a cast brass plate mounted on the track guard on one side. This will give the T number, assuming it hasn't long gone!

The engine will tell you which model, AEC diesel for MkIII and GM Detroit 671 for MkV.

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If the brass plate is missing you may have serious problems with an ID. Engine number would be available if present which may be some clue but only if it has the original lump which may be unlikely. Unfortunately, Valentine components were marked with paint numbers only in the factories which relates to the factory build numbers so something may appear if you are careful with the sandblasting and you may even find the T number on each of the drivers doors under the paint.

I believe that most if not all Valentines in OZ came from New Zealand in the 60's although there are rumours that some came from UK stocks for tractors in the early 50's. If it is ex NZ, you might find serial numbers stamped into the engine covers (air inlet louvres) which will be the NZ army number which may be possible to backtrack to the WD T number, original makers, chassis number etc Ignore any raised numbers in cast components, they are only the part number and will be the same on each Valentine.

If the engine compartment is empty, take note of the gear positions on the gear lever gate if that is there as that will identify the gearbox and thereby the engine as the individual gears are in different positions for the Spicer (GMC) box and the Meadows (AEC)box.

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Excellent info John.

 

With any luck, I'll clamber all over it tomorrow and take about a million photos. I should be seeing the owner on Sunday and will "interview" him about it for our website and will also share the information here.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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The Valentine is the one from the Melbourne Tank Museum and is fitted with an AEC diesel. It was used as a tractor and the controls have been moved back to the turret basket area and, I assume, it was used without a turret with the driver looking out over the top of the hull.

 

The turret has some significant damage on it, so it looks like that was from a range target at some stage. It does turn freely on the turret ring (well, there is a bit of metal that causes it to "stick" when going over the engine louvers, but a shove will get it going again.

 

Pics and videos to follow.

 

Cheers,

Terry

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This Valentine that was sold at the Melbourne Tank Museum sale in 2006 has a turret that came off the ranges in New Zealand many years ago, hence the damage. These came through the hands of the late James Swan. He imported enough bits and pieces of turrets to cobble together 5 for various projects in Australia.

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