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What are peoples opinions on jeep electrical systems?

I've restored a lot of jeeps, and they've always been 12v. My personal jeep is 12v, which in my opinion is much better than 6v because of the reliability.

I've just bought a GPW to restore and sell which has all the original 6v system intact and working. Would you like to see it kept in its original 6v state? Or would you prefer to buy one converted to 12?

 

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I've neevr had problems with a 6 volt WC54, just keep connections clean and use heavy gauge cables.

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With good connections and cables of the correct size there really is no need to go to 12V. Unless it's a radio jeep, 12V only detracts of the value in my personal opinion.

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Basic rule AC runs ON a wire, so surface area is important, DC runs IN a wire so diamieter is important. So whatever gauge you use for 12 volt, double it for 6.as you have half the pressure, yes I know not correct term but, driving the electrons along so need twice the amount . Watts = Volts X Amps

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"Basic rule AC runs ON a wire, so surface area is important, DC runs IN "

So the skin effect operates at 50Hz does it????

Diana

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11 hours ago, Diana and Jackie said:

"Basic rule AC runs ON a wire, so surface area is important, DC runs IN "

So the skin effect operates at 50Hz does it????

Diana

An AC current generates a magnetic field across the wire that opposes the flow of current, known as induction. DC does not. Yes any alternating current will flow through Skin Effect, the picture I was told was AC think of a swirling jet of water, it will cling to the sides of the pipe and leave a hole in the middle. DC is a smooth steady flow so can fill all the pipe. Probably better descriptions out there, but it works for me.

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I see.. interesting, a bit like water going down the plughole. the swirling is different depending in which hemisphere you live.

I must ask the next electrician I see if I can have hollow cables as the inside bit isn't any good and I am paying for it 🙂

Diana

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24 minutes ago, Diana and Jackie said:

I must ask the next electrician I see if I can have hollow cables as the inside bit isn't any good and I am paying for it 🙂

 

Diana

Think of the cost savings if we could get away with hollow cables everywhere...

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It would be phenomenal, I am surprised this idea hasn't caught on by now.

And think of the saving in natural resources, all based on hollow cables 🙂

 

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11 hours ago, Tony B said:

An AC current generates a magnetic field across the wire that opposes the flow of current, known as induction. DC does not. Yes any alternating current will flow through Skin Effect, the picture I was told was AC think of a swirling jet of water, it will cling to the sides of the pipe and leave a hole in the middle. DC is a smooth steady flow so can fill all the pipe. Probably better descriptions out there, but it works for me.

So Tony- given the foregoing, An AC current generates a magnetic field across the wire that opposes the flow of current, known as induction. DC does not.  and expounding your vast knowledge electricity can you explain how a DC clamp meter works?

Diana

PS - I did study physics, I think your ideas on electricity are wonderful 🙂 . I am in awe, as I'm sure is Chris McMillan.

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At 50Hz the skin effect is negligible, it's around 8mm deep, hence well inside any conductor you're likely to be using.  

And to answer Dian'a question, a clamp meter usually uses the hall effect.

Andy

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