Jump to content

opel blitz truck ww2


sylrgm
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • 2 months later...

excuse - but not very well research done !

 

1. The model is not a Opel Blitz - it´s a Daimler Benz L 701!

DB must build the Opel Blitz in licence from 1944 till 1948 (!) because the own L/LA3000 was a nightmare. Only DB used the wooden cab named "Einheitsfuhrerhaus". Also no Opel sign was used on the DB truck. The missing Zeppelin on the enginehood is a next feature.

Opel build all their Blitz with steel cabs (as the b/w photo shows) till the production ends at August 6. 1944 in a british bombing raid.

 

2. Too many modelers make this mistake: The use of the german cross is wrong on this kind of vehicle! Only german fighting vehicles (tanks) shown the german cross (still today). All light vehicles, trucks or other support vehicles only shown registration numbers, division signs and sometimes a blazon - thats fact.

 

Very well build DB 701 from Organisation Todt. But please remove the Luftwaffe-like cross.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2. Too many modelers make this mistake: The use of the german cross is wrong on this kind of vehicle! Only german fighting vehicles (tanks) shown the german cross (still today). All light vehicles, trucks or other support vehicles only shown registration numbers, division signs and sometimes a blazon - thats fact.

 

I keep telling them that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Only DB used the wooden cab named "Einheitsfuhrerhaus".

 

Roland, would you, or anybody else who might know, please explain to me the meaning of "Einheitsfuhrerhaus". I believe Einheits may refer to a policy of standardization of parts, and design, between different vehicle manufacturers and, even for me, "fuhrerhaus" is very easy to understand but put together, "Einheits" and "fuhrerhaus", don't make any sense. Was "Einheitsfurerhaus" a nickname given to any vehicle with a wooden cab ? Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok 6x6 I try it.

 

You are right as you say "Einheit" may refer to a policy of standardization of parts.

"Führerhaus" or "Fahrerhaus" means the same in german.

 

Absolutly nothing to do with THE "Führer" or "house of the führer"! Führer can be a leader, a manager, a pilot or a driver. So explain a "Führerhaus" as a driver cab.

 

"Einheitsführerhaus" named the standardizated wooden driver cabs on german trucks in late WW2. The idea was to use cheap (and every time to get) material to build cabs for any german truck manufacturer. It doesn´t need expensive hydraulic sheetmetal presses and every joiner or cabinet-maker could build or repair that ugly thing.

 

This original 1941 Opel Blitz 3,6S was mine before I get ito british vehicles ;-)

 

1593330.jpg

Edited by Roland
additional information
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for such a very clear explanation. Building a cab entirely from wood is just of the sort of ingenuity that was brought about by shortages of materials and production facilities. There must be many other examples though I can only think of the wooden, largely plywood, Mosquito aircraft at the moment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On my last visit to Falaise at the Trun scrap yard the `fence line` was partially made up of these types of wooden/composite material cabs, also among-st other items a complete Opel Maultier (half tracked truck) and a large stack of 88 MM barrels.

 

Ashley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...