Jump to content

Mystery Object No. 19


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 50
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

No idea of the formal name - but one of the boxes that goes on the wing of a Landie to house the aerial cable????

 

 

Nope, the box is made out of wood.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Does it hold string or rope :dunno:

 

 

Lee yes another very plausable suggestion but nope. Interestingly this item was associated with equipment that was prohibited to be sold to the Middle East, but like many embargos in the end it was sold to several countries in the region! But that might not help identify it. :|

Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the most famous thing you couldn't have in the middle east was booze -so a receptacle for beer bottle tops!! :-) :-) :-)

 

Ingenious line of thinking Neil, yes the bottle tops would fit in but nope that's not the real purpose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Anything to do with guided missiles? Richard

 

Hmmmm well yes. Very good, so what & why? Was that because of my tendancies or the embargo story that gave it away?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm well yes. Very good, so what & why? Was that because of my tendancies or the embargo story that gave it away?

 

A little bit of both really. The box obviously contains something, but the flap is opened only to check with some kind of instrument.

 

Richard

Link to post
Share on other sites

Really stabbing in the dark here....something to do with aerial photography by drones? Richard

 

Hmm nope, that last object is what goes in the box.

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK here's one for April, what's this then?

 

Dscf3112.jpg

 

Dscf3111.jpg

 

 

How about this then. Bear with me: it's a long one ("As usual." Ed) In the cavalry we had radios coming out of our ears (figuratively). Virtually every vehicle had at least one, the vast majority had two and Command Vehicles and the CO's rover would have at least three. When I transferred out and was posted to a REME Armoured Workshop, the scale of issue of radios was significantly less.

 

In the MRG HQ there was a single UK/VRC321 to work the Divisional Logistic Guard Net and another Clansman set whose model escapes me, which was VHF, possibly a UK/VRC353, though that would be hugely over-powered for the role in which we used it. The latter was used when in a location to communicate with what they now term PRRs (Personal Role Radios) issued one per platoon guard trench.

 

3 Platoon was the Forward REME Group which deployed separately from the MRG, nearer to the front line and the troops they supported (hence their name). Because they had ARVs and stuff, they probably had rather more by way of radio hardware than the MRG.

 

Each of the five remaining platoons had one such PRR. My memory tells me they were Clansman because ISTR they were supposed to be issued with a Clansman telephone-style handset, and therefore probably UK/PRC349s. 6th Platoon was the HQ platoon. We didn't deploy our own guard because the Workshop set up in a cricle with five platoons surrounding the HQ like covered wagons. However, 6 Platoon did have a 349 and it lived in my webbing because I was the ex-Control Signaller and ex-teeth arm. In the absence of someone to outrank me in the event of an incident, I'd command a Quick Reaction Force; otherwise I'd act as the QRF commander's radio operator. Because this was the role in which I used my set, I had acquired a throat mike and pressel to use in place of the handset, enabling me to at least monitor the net and use my personal weapon, though hand had to come off the weapon to press the pressel.

 

Radios were certainly not issued on a per-value basis and they weren't necessary because, when the MRG moved, everything moved at once.

 

It was quite normal for, for example, the QM to wander off to collect rations, POL etc, and the WSM to recce a new location for when we moved. Unfortunately for them, if we moved while they were away, there was no way for them to contact us by radio. We therefore had the concept of the dead letterbox. If the MRG moved out of a location and there were people who would return to the current location looking for us, a dead letterbox was designated and there would be left a note telling them where'd we'd moved to. This "dead letterbox" would typically be a note pinned to the tree next to the location that had been occupied by the Command Vehicle.

 

In the 1980s, the green movement had become very anti-military. It was after all now four decades since we'd set out to protect them from the Commie hoardes and they'd never come over the IGB yet, so why should they come now and why should the green movement pay taxes to enable us to wreck their land? In particular they didn't like anybody sticking nails in their trees to poison them, then leave them there for poor animals to catch on. Nailing dead letters was therefore not popular with the greens.

 

I put it to you, therefore, that the item we are looking at is in fact a dead letterbox designed to keep the greens from whingeing about squaddies sticking nails in their trees.

 

Or a meringue?

Edited by Marmite!!
Photo links repaired
Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...