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Land Rover 24v Stripping for restoration

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My question is that I have a winterised FFR Lightweight with the 90amp generator.

 

I am stripping it all down for restoration and building up a new chassis.

 

The Gen panel is positioned behind the seat bulkhead and I know the wiring/ cable connections are quite involving within.

 

Is it easier to seperate the cabling from the generator itself or the gen panel in order to remove the items for transplant.

 

Has anyone takled the same issue and therefore offer some advice?

 

Regards

IMAG0365.jpg

IMAG0226.jpg

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Wayne,

 

Just undo the cable from both ends, the large plugs should come off quite easily.

 

Chris

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Looking inside the gen panel there appears to be some sensitive stuff that needs to be undone at the back to allow the cables to be pulled through and out!

 

It would be so much easier if the cable that joined the 2 was an umbilical cord arrangement!

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Wayne,

 

You don't need to take the generator panel apart, just un do the large plugs! I've replaced these panels and alternators before, and you don't need to open anything up.

 

Chris

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Wayne,

 

You don't need to take the generator panel apart, just un do the large plugs! I've replaced these panels and alternators before, and you don't need to open anything up.

 

Chris

 

Chris so the cable that runs to the two is just an extension cable with a female / male end connection to the gen and panel......

 

I had to open the shunt box to remove the cables as the collar to the box was just a gland connection. I assumed Gen Panel and Generator were the same??????:nut:

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Wayne,

 

It's a large multi pin plug. Unscrew the collar and it should come off. See photo of alternator below.

 

Chris

Ferret Restoration (254).JPG

IMAG0365[1].jpg

Edited by sirhc

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Wayne,

 

It's a large multi pin plug. Unscrew the collar and it should come off. See photo of alternator below.

 

Chris

 

That looks ideal...I guess the same scenario at the Gen Panel end ;)

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That looks ideal...I guess the same scenario at the Gen Panel end ;)

 

Yes.. that would be why they put it there!

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Yes.. that would be why they put it there!

 

Thats brilliant Chris and thanks for your assistance.

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Hi Wayne. I have had probs. in the past with chargeing. The harness should unscrew with a little care off the gen. and panel as Cris states. I used a large pair of pipe grips loosely set on the collars, and very gently eased loose, gently tightened a time or two with a very small amount of easing fluid. They both then unscrewed by hand. If you need to use grips, do take care not to distort those collars.

What ever you do take care with that gen. panel. (see my thread on charging). At least yours is in the Landi. as when they are built they are sealed and tested for leaks to keep out water/moisture.

Hope of help.

Andy.

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One way to loosen the plugs is to lightly tap the collar round using a screwdriver or drift and a mallet.

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Hi Wayne. I have had probs. in the past with chargeing. The harness should unscrew with a little care off the gen. and panel as Cris states. I used a large pair of pipe grips loosely set on the collars, and very gently eased loose, gently tightened a time or two with a very small amount of easing fluid. They both then unscrewed by hand. If you need to use grips, do take care not to distort those collars.

What ever you do take care with that gen. panel. (see my thread on charging). At least yours is in the Landi. as when they are built they are sealed and tested for leaks to keep out water/moisture.

Hope of help.

Andy.

 

Thanks Andy....You say sealed and tested, but the cover to the Gen panel in the rear is a naked joint. between cover plate and base housing. No gasket/ no seal at all. Based upon your thread that did cross my mind I was thinking of a thin coat of grease before assembly or the non setting sealant as used for caravans etc. The same sort of sealant used between seat base and rear tub.

 

That would keep all water or moisture out. Have you tried such an approach to make yours watertight and stop seepage?????

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You say sealed and tested, but the cover to the Gen panel in the rear is a naked joint. between cover plate and base housing. No gasket/ no seal at all.

 

Wayne you should have this:

 

Dscf2244a.jpg

 

You could enhance the quality of seal by smearing some silicone grease over the seal.

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Wayne you should have this:

 

Dscf2244a.jpg

 

You could enhance the quality of seal by smearing some silicone grease over the seal.

 

Clive I must confess I did not see that rubber gasket/ seal, but that means it is probably there.

 

Silicone grease is not quite as good as white grease, commonly used on mountain bikes and motocross. Given the extreme conditions they plough through that would probably be better, albeit it is similar but higher specification.

Edited by Rover8FFR
grammar

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Wayne I have no experience of white grease. It's just that the manufacturer of certain autoclaves required the main neoprene seal around the door to be smeared with silicone grease to ensure a security of seal. With steam at a couple of bars this was important of course.

 

I'm not sure whether this was because it was an un-reactive grease or somehow helped maintain the integrity of the material.

 

Whichever you use, you could always attach LV6/MT4/W3/WC52765 Outfit, 'A', seal testing by removing the blanking plug in the lid. When assembled immerse the panel in one foot of water & pressurise to 6psi & leave for one minute, & check that no air bubbles emerge.

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Wayne I have no experience of white grease. It's just that the manufacturer of certain autoclaves required the main neoprene seal around the door to be smeared with silicone grease to ensure a security of seal. With steam at a couple of bars this was important of course.

 

I'm not sure whether this was because it was an un-reactive grease or somehow helped maintain the integrity of the material.

 

Whichever you use, you could always attach LV6/MT4/W3/WC52765 Outfit, 'A', seal testing by removing the blanking plug in the lid. When assembled immerse the panel in one foot of water & pressurise to 6psi & leave for one minute, & check that no air bubbles emerge.

 

Wow! I won't be deep wading, but of more importance will be the tightening sequence and torque for each of the nuts / studs etc to ensure equal clamping pressure against the seal. Do these re-assembly facts exist at all?

 

I know the pressures you mention are not the same but the scenario is the same as a head gasket I guess.......On a much lesser scale, albeit no heat involved!

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Yes steam leaking from one of those can be a bit nasty.

 

There is no prescribed sequence for tightening but gradual tightening from near opposite sides until fairly firm with a short hand spanner I think is the way to go. No torque is mentioned in the Field & Base Repairs nor in the Inspection Standard.

 

As for the grease it is defined in EMER POWER P134/27 "Refit the cover after lightly treating the sealing ring with H1/6850-99-942-4829 silicon compound"

 

This has been reclassified from a miscellaneous chemical speciality to an electrical insulating material hence H1/5970-99-942-4829

 

This is XG-250, which benefits from freedom from corrosive action on metals & its effect on rubbers, waterproof sealing properties, electrical proof strength, power factor, permittivity, evaporation loss, low temperature & storage stability.

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Yes steam leaking from one of those can be a bit nasty.

 

There is no prescribed sequence for tightening but gradual tightening from near opposite sides until fairly firm with a short hand spanner I think is the way to go. No torque is mentioned in the Field & Base Repairs nor in the Inspection Standard.

 

As for the grease it is defined in EMER POWER P134/27 "Refit the cover after lightly treating the sealing ring with H1/6850-99-942-4829 silicon compound"

 

This has been reclassified from a miscellaneous chemical speciality to an electrical insulating material hence H1/5970-99-942-4829

 

This is XG-250, which benefits from freedom from corrosive action on metals & its effect on rubbers, waterproof sealing properties, electrical proof strength, power factor, permittivity, evaporation loss, low temperature & storage stability.

 

Defo sound like white grease that is ultimately graphite based I think? (not sure) and so more resilient to abbrasives and presures, and is so designed to resist water and dirt penetration / ingress as well as not effecting dust seals and gaskets.

 

Common sense that an approach similar to head gaskets and road wheels being tightened would make sense. Equal tightening up and using an opposite / alternate route in lieu of circumferental.

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Defo sound like white grease that is ultimately graphite based I think? (not sure)

 

Common sense that an approach similar to head gaskets and road wheels being tightened would make sense. Equal tightening up and using an opposite / alternate route in lieu of circumferental.

 

Hi Wayne,

 

Just to confirm what Clive is telling you, XG-250 is a silicone compound. It is a thick, sticky consistency, so no run off, so long as it fills the groove around the O-ring it will keep the moisture out. Regarding tightening the cover, it is not like a head gasket where you are compressing the gasket. With this cover it is pinching the ring into its groove and the cover tightens up against the box, ie metal to metal, so just use your discretion tightening. As the say, "tight is tight and too tight is broke". :-)

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Hi Wayne,

 

Just to confirm what Clive is telling you, XG-250 is a silicone compound. It is a thick, sticky consistency, so no run off, so long as it fills the groove around the O-ring it will keep the moisture out. Regarding tightening the cover, it is not like a head gasket where you are compressing the gasket. With this cover it is pinching the ring into its groove and the cover tightens up against the box, ie metal to metal, so just use your discretion tightening. As the say, "tight is tight and too tight is broke". :-)

 

Cheers Richard ;)

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A huge thank you to everyone on this matter.

 

The large cables are now seperated from the 90amp Gen and the Gen Panel.

 

Seperated exactly as you guys suggested. Happy Days :D

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Thanks Andy....

 

That would keep all water or moisture out. Have you tried such an approach to make yours watertight and stop seepage?????

Hi, not yet picked up the courage to get underneath..... yes on mine it is underneath :embarrassed: to remove and see if condensation is inside that is causing the charging problem. But yes I will have to reseal. So your thread will help me on that subject.

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Managed to get a little more done today, disconnecting the generator and panel and also getting closer to remove the engine for refurb and repaint before refit in new chassis.

 

 

 

Nearside view with rad panel, rad and oil cooler removed in one unit.

 

 

 

Generator panel exposing connections and manufacture data plate.

 

 

 

Closer view to front of engine now exposed.

 

 

 

Offside angle view.

 

 

 

Another image of gen panel.

IMAG0521.jpg

IMAG0520.jpg

IMAG0519.jpg

IMAG0518.jpg

IMAG0517.jpg

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Hi.

Just found your site. The large copper harness is at the bottom of the alternator on my 109 ffr, does it have to be at the top as per your photo ?. Or does it make any differance ?.

Regards.

Chris.

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Chris later installations such as yours seemed to be in that position. It did afford greater protection for it & its connector being tucked out of the way. The downside is that it is much more difficult to attend to any cross thread problem or take measurements on the generator. Besides I suspect your harness may not quite long enough to reach the top.

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