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Nick Johns

Changes to HGV vehicle categories no longer exempt from Test

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Further to the previous consultations decisions are now made that affects  HGV vehicles that are present exempt from test or claimed exemption will from 2019 need to be tested, including, Breakdown vehicles, mobile Cranes, heavy & light locomotives, concrete trucks, ..basically anything built on an hgv production chassis,   the test exemption for historic commercials stays at pre 1960, this will affect most post 1960 over 3500kg military vehicles that presumably could affect the ability to self declare test exemption using form V112,

.http://www.commercialmotor.com/news/compliance/dvsa-implement-phased-approach-annual-test-changes

 

 

Edited by Nick Johns

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On 6 November 2017 at 3:38 PM, Nick Johns said:

Further to the previous consultations decisions are now made that affects  HGV vehicles that are present exempt from test or claimed exemption will from 2019 need to be tested, including, Breakdown vehicles, mobile Cranes, heavy & light locomotives, concrete trucks, ..basically anything built on an hgv production chassis,   the test exemption for historic commercials stays at pre 1960, this will affect most post 1960 over 3500kg military vehicles that presumably could affect the ability to self declare test exemption using form V112,

.http://www.commercialmotor.com/news/compliance/dvsa-implement-phased-approach-annual-test-changes

 

 

After reading the Commercial Motor article, it seems to me that the changes would apply to vehicles being used commercially. My Leyland Daf 4 Tonner fitted with a Radio Repair body is registered as a Motor Caravan and it goes through a large class 4 Mot each year, this truck has been inspected by VOSA when they still had testing stations, and by someone that I was chatting to at Wicksteed at War, who turned out to be a DVSA examiner, both were happy that the camper conversion was in line with the criteria set down for motor caravans.

Some people seem to waste a lot of time and effort to get MoT exemption, my personal opinion is that it is worth paying a few quid a year for the peace of mind that the brakes etc are up to scratch.

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14 hours ago, johnwardle said:

After reading the Commercial Motor article, it seems to me that the changes would apply to vehicles being used commercially. My Leyland Daf 4 Tonner fitted with a Radio Repair body is registered as a Motor Caravan and it goes through a large class 4 Mot each year, this truck has been inspected by VOSA when they still had testing stations, and by someone that I was chatting to at Wicksteed at War, who turned out to be a DVSA examiner, both were happy that the camper conversion was in line with the criteria set down for motor caravans.

Some people seem to waste a lot of time and effort to get MoT exemption, my personal opinion is that it is worth paying a few quid a year for the peace of mind that the brakes etc are up to scratch.

Any pictures of your Leyland Daf 4 tonner? I'm a new owner of one, just waiting for my registration documents to come back.

20171018_142831.jpg

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This is the only photo of my Leyland Daf that I have on my iPad, I don't have any photos of the interior, basically I scrapped my old caravan on then put all the fittings in to the Radio Repair body.

The criteria for a motor caravan is that it must have fixed cooking and washing facilities, fixed seating that may convert to a bed, fixed storage facilities and a table that may be fixed or removable. The important thing to remember is that all these things must be fixed.

image.jpeg

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No I haven't, that photo is about 6 years old, I would love to respray it, but I don't have anywhere to do it.

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You say the fittings must be fixed but isn’t the body demountable?

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Theoretically yes, but the nuts on the clamps that hold the body on are welded on so it would be a lot of effort to demount it, this was done at VOSAs suggestion.

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On 06/11/2017 at 3:38 PM, Nick Johns said:

Further to the previous consultations decisions are now made that affects  HGV vehicles that are present exempt from test or claimed exemption will from 2019 need to be tested, including, Breakdown vehicles, mobile Cranes, heavy & light locomotives, concrete trucks, ..basically anything built on an hgv production chassis,   the test exemption for historic commercials stays at pre 1960, this will affect most post 1960 over 3500kg military vehicles that presumably could affect the ability to self declare test exemption using form V112,

.http://www.commercialmotor.com/news/compliance/dvsa-implement-phased-approach-annual-test-changes

 

 

So the changes should only affect vehicles built on HGV chassis, but who will determine and how will the issue be managed of deciding if a vehicle is in scope or not?

My Iron Fairy Six is Engineering Plant (it doesn't fit the Mobile Crane definition for various reasons even though it is a crane and is mobile) but to get it to an MOT would involve either a low-loader or about a day of driving a 12mph vehicle on A roads. It is not an HGV chassis, of course. Hopefully there will be no suggestion that a test will become needed.

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