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AlfRim

Welbike brake and handlebars

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Hello

 

Im a bit confused about my welbike. The original handlebars has had the bit for the clutch, and for the throttle cut off. You can still see the weld marks from where they were. I was thinking about it and could the person who owned this welbike used normal motorcycle grips and levers? It was last used in the 40s/50s. The rear wheel brake assembly has also been modified for a cable instead of the normal brake rod. What’s everyone’s thoughts? 
 

Im thinking about cutting the brake parts off and making it correct, then welding the bits back on the handlebars but it seems like a wartime fix, plus its part of the bikes history which I would be losing. 
 

kind regards

 Alfie

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Hi Alfie 

In the post war period spares for these vehicles were very hard to get and I am confident these are post war and civilian modifications to keep the bike running ..

.whilst it's relatively easy to get most spares today there was a long period where bikes of this type had low value ..spares where hard to locate and modifying them to keep them running was simply the only choice ...

As a child I wanted a welbike and was aware my grandfather who had a motorbike shop could locate them ..I saw other  children riding them and was desperate to get a - mini bike but he thought I should have a proper bike and my brothers and sisters shared  an 98cc  excelsior consort as our field bike .

I still have the consort but it's value is negotiable in comparison with a welbike today

Jenkinov

 

 

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I agree with Jenk, Alfie. I can't think of a reason that a workshop during the war would have made such changes when the bike was virtually brand new and proper spares were easier to obtain than making changes. Ron 

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12 hours ago, jenkinov said:

Hi Alfie 

In the post war period spares for these vehicles were very hard to get and I am confident these are post war and civilian modifications to keep the bike running ..

.whilst it's relatively easy to get most spares today there was a long period where bikes of this type had low value ..spares where hard to locate and modifying them to keep them running was simply the only choice ...

As a child I wanted a welbike and was aware my grandfather who had a motorbike shop could locate them ..I saw other  children riding them and was desperate to get a - mini bike but he thought I should have a proper bike and my brothers and sisters shared  an 98cc  excelsior consort as our field bike .

I still have the consort but it's value is negotiable in comparison with a welbike today

Jenkinov

 

 

Hello,

 

that is what I thought too. I was thinking it could possibly be wartime because I think there’s brown paint on it! But I agree, most likely post war. 
 

It’s nice that you still have the consort. Hopefully you’ll keep it for many more years! 
 

cheers

Alfie

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6 hours ago, Ron said:

I agree with Jenk, Alfie. I can't think of a reason that a workshop during the war would have made such changes when the bike was virtually brand new and proper spares were easier to obtain than making changes. Ron 

Yes, I agree with you both. Now the decision to either cut it off and make it correct, or leave it as it’s part of its history. 


During the war they would’ve most likely thrown it away and found another bike! 
 

Cheers

Alfie

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Alfie

Whilst the repairs completed post war are part of the bikes history i suspect they arose directly from the absence of genuine parts and they were clearly  innovative and effective in keeping the bike running  which in turn contributed to the bikes survival.

But my view is this was pure necessity and had parts been available the bike may have been maintained in Near original condition. As. Such i don't think that you destroy any of its history in returning it to nearer it's military specification .

But as the owner it's your choice on the depth and style of restoration..

 

Whatever you choose please share the journey with the forum

 

Jenkinov

 

Also 

 

Th 

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