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CMP-Phil

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About CMP-Phil

  • Rank
    Sergeant

Personal Information

  • Location
    New Hampshire, USA
  • Interests
    CMPs - Canadian Military Pattern Vehicles
  • Occupation
    Retired Business Consultant
  • Homepage
    http://canadianmilitarypattern.com

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  1. Hi What type of canvas were you using? Was it new or old stock? I've had problems making canvas covers for generators, modern canvas just not as good as canvas from 50 years ago. Have had the same problems making seat covers for my MVs until I went over to using Dupont Cordura fabric which seems to have much better wear and sun rot characteristics. I made a penthouse cover like you show which has stood up well but my.truck is garaged and I remove the penthouse fly when not in use. Wonder how boat canvas would work? Will be interested to hear what you find. Cheers Phil
  2. Hi If the temperature gauge you were testing is brand new, when you dip the end in boiling water it should read 100 C or 212 F but if it doesn't, try dipping the sender end in cool water then back into boiling back and forth a few times. I've had one of these direct tube type where the gauge just needed to loosen up. But more important do the same with any new thermostat. With a thermometer, kitchen type, in a pot of the water heat the new thermostat and watch as it opens and at what temperature. I've had 140, 160, and 180 F new thermostats not open for the first time until the water was at a rolling boil. Once they have been cycled from 100 F to 212 F a couple of times they start opening and closing much faster. More important they should open at their rates temperature. Having thermostat in old or new engine is particularly important if they vehicle doesn't get driven enough to drive the condensation out the engine and the oil. Cheers Phil
  3. Hi Peter Perhaps to widen the stance of the vehicle, to improve cross slope performance. It would take some measurements and calculations to see if there would have be a meaningful change to resisting side roll over. Or might it have been the result of changing tire profile for better traction? Cheers Phil
  4. Hi All Setting up for a short video. Cheers Phil
  5. Hi I really like your post, had been thinking of doing something similar, and your post got me out of the house to do it. Started all three CMPs and drove them out of the shop to warm up then it was drive the HUP out down the drive, walk back 600 feet, drive the Pattern 12 3ton out, walk back, drive the Pattern 13 Radio Truck out. Take pictures, the repeat the process backing each of the trucks back up the drive. I shot some gopro of the fun which needs to be edited and uploaded. Cheers Phil
  6. Hi All When US went over to E10 gas years ago it had a dramatic and problematic impact on MVs. In as little as one tank full, fuel pumps failed, flexible fuel lines leaked or swollen to the extent they didn't pass fuel, gas cans started leaking around the caps. The first couple parades that year it was not uncommon to have a truck fail, often the story went like this, "well I filled the tank this morning on the way to the parade". The thing noticed was the drop in power and fuel mileage. Once people, in our MV Club figured out what was going on, it was a race find the actual ethonal resistant Gates hose. Fuel pumps were more problematic. Good luck on the change over. Cheers Phil
  7. Hi Back to the original question how can we keep our MVs running particularly the WWII gasoline powered? For years I have suspected with the changes in gasoline we will reach a point where engines with carbs will simply not be practical. All ready in the US the Ethanol gas has caused many problems (which is a different topic) but the result is going to make it more of a problem to keep running. So what do I plan to do, answer LNG or propane the converstion units are out there, lots of forklifts us them. The only thing will be where do we put the tanks? Cheers Phil
  8. Hi Josh Here are a couple of photos of the hinges that I fabricated, the size of the bolt pin was dictated by what size tubing that would be a snug fit. Hope it helps Cheers Phil
  9. Hi Josh Do you have the hinges? My Pat 12 hinges were so bent that they were unusable, made some up when I first restored the truck as an expedient but they have worked so well they're still on the truck 10 years later and working fine. Approached the problem from the point of view of a REME mechanic out in the desert. Parts list, couple pieces of scrap diamond plate, four 3/8 bolts for the pins and a couple of inches of 3/8 ID pipe, weld and drill to suit. Will dig out some detail photos an post them. Keep us posted on your progress. Cheers Phil
  10. Hi Josh Have a look over on, http://www.mapleleafup.net/forums/index.php several of us have basically end up building new ones by the time we finished replacing all the rust. The doors are really pretty simple and straight forward sheet metal work. Have some photos of sheet metal work on my Pat 12 on my website http://canadianmilitarypattern.com/SheetMetalWork.html I happen to have my Chevy Pat 12 drivers door off at the moment if you need any measurements? Cheers Phil
  11. Nicely done, good idea, nice prsentation. Nice bench mark for each of us to consider, what did we do this year. Cheers Phil
  12. Hi Andrew Peter is correct about the normal temperature ranges. One of the thing that is often forgotten about having an engine running too colds is condensation inside the engine. If the engine never gets up above 140-160F it will have a hard time getting rid of the condensation (water) or un-burned gas that is going collect which will in fairly short time building sludge in the engine. That you have noticed an improvement in the truck's performance when you block off a little of the radiator says that it is happier as well. Keep us posted on what you find. Cheers Phil
  13. Hi Johann Great to see the progress you have made and all the hard work you have put into your HUP. Cheers Phil
  14. Hi Jon Very neat additions to the space, does add a lot of atmosphere. Cheers Phil
  15. Hi Mark First how much have you driven it lately? All of my Military Vehicles of that and early vintage tend to leak more when they haven't been run for a while . But it seems to slow way down after they have been driven for a couple of hours. If it is not running out in a steady stream, I'd check the oil level and take it for a drive. Checking the oil level in the crank case is also important, is it overfilled, does it smell of gas, does it feel thin? You probably guess what I'm getting at gas getting into the crankcase and dilution. Let us know what you find. Cheers Phil
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