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flandersflyer

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Everything posted by flandersflyer

  1. I'm Fairly sure it'd affect the copper as well...
  2. This is why I'd fill it with water...then freeze it...
  3. Come on then pal... Show me how your going to bend a 1 3/8 copper tube with a 'spring'.... Lol...lol... Sometimes fella...🤔
  4. If he clamped them wood formers in a vice so the sides were in the vice Jaws...then they would be... Steve: Fill the tube either with sand... or water and freeze it.... That will prevent the tube walls from collapsing.. Personally I'd fill it with water and freeze it...
  5. The way to have done that Ben would've been to fill the pipe with water...freeze it...then bend it... The frozen ice plug would've prevented he tube from distorting and rippling etc...
  6. Better making the wood to fit the casting in my book... Face it steve: It's either fettling the wood or packers...i know which one I'd have aimed for... They would have done the same at Thornycrofts no doubt... Keep at it... Maybe next year it'll make shuttleworth...my mate will be back with his albions so no doubt I'll turn up to 'inspect' the finished J...
  7. Another way of pushing larger diameter holes with a modest machine would be using a rotabroach... They cut out a slug...(on the radius)...rather than taking out the whole CSA One of my antique steam powered radial drills has a brass rating plate on it that states: 5" drill at 36RPM You can't even get a 5" drill now... Dia's that size are rotabroach and flycutter work nowadays...
  8. A quick one on using brake presses and folders Steve: If there's a slight overbending of sheet then it's not too much of an issue... Think about what's happening when you put a return on sheet/plate: Your STRETCHING the outer edge of the return...and SHRINKING the inner edge... And as it's considerably easier to stretch...rather than shrink metals then by taking your return just over the required angle....it'll always want to pull back a little to where you need it...🙂 Incidentally: When putting long returns on heavier stuff (1/4" upwards)... what you'll often find is...say you get the return at 90* at the ends...it'll often be under towards the middle...what we used to do was take it to a point where we achieved a 90* return across the middle section...this meant the ends were often over...say 93*-94*...then we'd flip the folded plate over on some trestles...copper hammer and you can bring back the ends cold to 90* by planishing with the copper hammer... Don't forget that once a material has been worked it'll want to relax a little...with a bit of know how you can use this to your advantage...😉 Kind regards Glenn GLMelectrical
  9. And get rid of people who use their money to push their agendas...even in defiance of a public instruction.... I'd launch em all off the cliffs of Dover...
  10. When did I say Gina Miller couldn't have her say...?
  11. I vote Branson to be the first to try out his invention...together with all his remoaning pals... He can take that cow Gina Miller with him...
  12. In regards health n safety We could go back to the days of common sense as well Where people were schooled properly...thought about what they were going to do before doing it and took responsibility for themselves and considered how their actions might effect others... We see emptyheads everywhere now: At work... Driving along on the roads... on the TV & radio... in positions of influence & power... In decision making... I'm sick of em all I'll tell you...
  13. I said guy Martin needed to stop attempting to be Fred...and get his own act
  14. It's the grade though 216 and 218 are I think supposed to be a good one
  15. If your going to machine em from billet then you might as well forge the blanks first...
  16. I'm sorry steve but I'd be forging that mate... Cut out the wastes afterwards with the bottles... Cold chisel to knock off any fluff... Die grinder to brighten it up... (if your burning gear is set rite)...
  17. Iron welds beautifully...but there's rules to abide by For a start it's difficult to know what grade of iron you have...particularly with older items...or items from minor foundries and obscure manufacturers that often just threw any old crap into the cupola... Secondly the long term effects of hot & cold...hot & cold effects iron on the molecular level...this can make it difficult to weld with an argon set... Thirdly is the issue of thermoshock... Iron generally only allows for about 5% movement during heating & cooling...which can manifest itself with cracking on large surfaces... In your case a good move would be to prep the area to be welded first by identifying points where cracks end...and drilling at a point just beyond (this prevents the crack from creeping)...a narrow Vee prep to cracks (both sides)...and the usual support during welding... You need a DC stick welder and a pack of 2.5mm nickel rods... Go DC electrode negative for welding the root...and then put the welding plant into DC electrode positive for capping the root weld... You'll need a bucket large enough to put the welded part in...and some kiln dried sand... If you have access to a coke forge you can get an even pre-heat on the part to be welded...and also give it a post-heat after welding before chucking it in the bucket and covering it with the dry sand... An alternative to covering it in sand would be to keep it in the forge and gradually reduce the heat over a given time... Or tell her indoors you've allocated her £100 pocket money allowance to go buy herself summat fancy with...once she's out of sight you can use the oven in her kitchen to gradually pre then post heat the casting...
  18. I don't have Guy Martin down as anything other than a passenger...he rides the back of the late great Mr. Dibnah...rather than getting his own act... In regards to my question as to if you worked for a local authority...you seemed defensive...i thought it was a familiar old pattern developing...
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