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Cel

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Everything posted by Cel

  1. Right you are! Looks like the crankshaft is still in one piece;) Good progress so far! Marcel
  2. That will be interesting to find out. I was wondering whether the N° 25 is the serial number, if so I guess it would be an early one? Marcel
  3. Looking great, another milestone achieved! I also like the press very much. Is there any freeze protection for it, or is the water just drained after a session? Regards Marcel
  4. Well thanks to this forum the cart mistery is solved! I was contacted about the Peugeot by a gentlemen here in Belgium a few days ago and thought I'd send him a picture of the cart. He replied almost immediately! The cart was used to transport the tools of the gunsmiths and blacksmiths, and was produced between 1907 and 1916. So far it is the only one known, in fact it was believed that none had survived. The 'bad' news is that it is not complete, the pictures show why. I am now looking for a set of wheels so we can reproduce the dolly (or whatever it is called). Another project on the list! Regards Marcel
  5. Same as above, if you can't attach some threaded rods to the flywheel or braces behind it to pull put it under a press. You will have to take out the crankshaft anyway I guess? It is not too difficult to make your own puller, just make it heavy enough. Here is an example of a puller that I made a few weeks ago. The bearing and housing had to come off together, no way with a classic puller even though it was a quality one. I spent a couple of hours fabricating one but the bearing came off in no time. The puller is now on the shelf for future jobs. BTW Steve, I think it was a relief when the 'onion' was relieved without damage, and it will be a pleasure to fit another nice and clean original part! Marcel
  6. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Beautiful weather today, so because the forecast says rain for the coming days I decided to try and take the Peugeot out for its first spin. Some minor adjustments are needed but I was amazed how well the gear shifting went! Marcel
  7. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    More woodworking today, the cross members are ready to fit. For some reason we managed to fit the rear wheels without the felt seals. So after a couple of hours collecting wood dust I decided to make the new seals. Found two pieces of pipe that matched the dimensions. A 10° edge was turned on one side and in no time the seals were pressed. Marcel prepared for cutting with the bandsaw ready to fit after treating with the band saw and band grinder inner diameter of the felt seal pressing the outer diameter the finished product ready to fit!
  8. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    More work has been done on the wood. As I have not much experience in woodworking it takes a bit longer than normal but we're getting there! Marcel
  9. Great work again on a lovely old lathe! Good thing that not all of these heavy old machines have been scrapped or exported. I missed out on a big facing late from the early 1900's a few months ago. Not that I have a lot of use for it but if I find one I will find a spot in the shed to install it. Another way of boring wheels (if a lathe is not available) is to put them on a radial drill. I did this with a tractor wheel a few years ago, with a homemade tool holder. Marcel
  10. This is how it would have looked like. This truck was for sale in the USA a few years ago, I hope it got saved and is under restoration.
  11. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Thanks Andy, luckily they were not that much worn out. I acquired a postcard that arrived in the mail today. Bought it for the photo but I was amazed with the writing on the back. One of the three men in the photo writes to his parents to say that everything goes well and that he is posing with two friends on their 'ambulance car'. Marcel
  12. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    I have been looking at a few tank sealers, and after talking to a friend who has used it with success it was indeed the most expensive one that I ordered! This evening I re-assembled the exhaust muffler. We had a new tube rolled out of 2 mm steel plate, cut it to length and only had to tighten the ends up. My father will paint it tomorrow. He also attached the main beams to the chassis. Last Saturday was a very hot day over here, so I decided to do a more quiet job and installed the new bearings in the gearbox. One bearing had spun around in the housing, causing a bit of wear. I measured the play with a valve clearance gauge, it appeared to be a bit less than 0,2 mm. A 0,1 mm shim was cut to size and put in the housing and to my relief I was able to gently tap the bearing in. Once assembled I also connected the drive shaft which was a quite straightforward job. Marcel .
  13. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    I have been doing some smaller jobs on the Peugeot. Fitted the cardan on the rear axle, made new filler caps for the radiator and petrol tank and decide to take apart the gearbox because the bearing on the input shaft had too much play. New bearings are ordered and should arrive tomorrow. One of the next jobs will be the sealing of the petrol tank with tank sealer. Marcel
  14. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    I think I understand, thank you for the clarification. Will measure the angles and see how that matches to the phasing, that should be deliberate then? Steve, on my lathe I have a pitch that is large enough to cut this groove. I was not aware of that until I needed it, so I was quite pleased to find it out! Marcel
  15. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Work continued on the cardan joints, they are both ready to fit now. The diff side is the sliding one, the grooves all have several lubrication holes. It goes to show that back in 1916 this was a new system and a bit overengineered because they probably didn't know how it would act. I have replaced the felt ring but when assembling the shaft I noticed that it is not possible to line up both the cardans. They should be in line but I guess it will work this way? The whole shaft assembly is quite heavy, about 40 kg. Also interesting is how the diff end is connected to the tube, several studs that are riveted to the tube and made flush. You can't see where they are from the outside. I have also ordered new bearings for the gearbox, more of that next week. Marcel:D The holes on the gearbox side were oval and now round again also the shaft was worn so a new one was made up no welding! new felt seal no alignment between the two cardans:???
  16. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Thats a very nice lathe Andy, and an even nicer cabinet you made for it! I know that site, there are pictures of my treadle lathe in the Karger section. Just love belt driven machinery, one of our ongoing projects is a small workshop with a lineshaft. The guarding on the bandsaw was fitted by the previous owner, it is quite simple but it feels indeed a lot safer to work with! Steve, we actually have no space left in the shed but somehow we always manage to find an empty spot when we find another item we cannot resist:-D This evening I made new bushings for one cardan joint of the propshaft, the old ones were badly worn. These run inside a bowl that is partially filled with oil. reaming to size and inline ready to fit! Marcel
  17. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    That picture certainly contains some interesting details, thanks for posting it here! We have started working on the body. A few months ago we made an offer on several woodworking machines. Last week the call came that our offer was accepted and last Saturday we went to remove them from the shop they were in for 50+ years. Today we used the planer and the band saw. We first cut holes in the long beams, then split them in two halves on the bandsaw and made the openings. We have enough old bolts with square nuts that were given to us by a good friend. More pictures will follow as we make progress! Marcel
  18. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    We had several nice oaks that we cut with our sawmill. Is it the wood itself that is corrosive to the steel? I am not that good in wood things, better with metal! As for the impeller: I also think it might have something to do with too much cooling, and the thermo-siphon which works good. However, as they kept turning the grease cap on the water pump housing, it was full of grease so there was not much water that could circulate. Maybe just enough? I guess we will never know the details, if only these old things could tell their stories... Regards Marcel
  19. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    David, see post 19 and 46 of this thread, that should make it clear. Regards Marcel
  20. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Got the engine running today!
  21. It appears to be heavy enough on its own, so no extra support needed. I did not take a peak under the bonnet, there were so many things to see and time was limited. But it should look like this: [ATTACH=CONFIG]91263[/ATTACH] Marcel
  22. Spotted this fantastic Renault last tuesday. It was fitted after the war with a double winch for cable ploughing. Marcel
  23. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    We have made good progress, it won't be long before the engine is running. I had to make two new brackets in aluminium as one was broken and the other replaced by a steel shell. These keep the water pump in place and also have some kind of system to prevent the gland nuts from rotating. I still have to figure out what this looks like. The gland nuts were hand made as you can still see the scribing marks on them. Bottom end is nearly done as well, the oil pan will be fitted next. We are cleaning the radiator with a mixture of vinegar and salt, it works nice. While working on the radiator we found a small tag that was apperently fitted in 1928, probably after a repair? Regards Marcel
  24. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Thanks Andy, will probably do that. I am looking for long reach plugs although the old ones are short. The valves are installed. I did not have to shorten the stems after grinding the valves and milling the seats as you can adjust the play with buttons in the follower. There is also a spring integrated so it will not knock on the valve stem. I also made the impeller for the water pump. The original one was probably bronze but I decided to make a steel one. Also the diff is in and the half shafts. One of the next parts to tackle is the radiator. It does not leak but the cooling fins are rusted. Any ideas on how to clean and protect it? I was thinking of carefully pressure washing and then apply a coat of owatrol. Also, what would be the best procedure to clean up the brass? Thanks, Marcel
  25. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Things are coming together slowly. The pistons and conrods are assembled and in the bores. These were honed to remove the glazing and are very clean now. We will put the block on the bed tomorrow so I can install the valves. I have mentioned that the original flywheel and clutch were missing, they were probably removed because of the broken crankshaft and got lost. I hope I will find those missing parts sometime, and have decided to install a flywheel with disc clutch. I have machined an adapter to take the flywheel, and a shaft that screws into the adapter. A splined bushing will go on this shaft and from there on I'll have to make a short propshaft to the gearbox. Again, not original but it will have to do the job. It is time to start looking at the spark plugs as well. These are of the type with the mica isolator. I have never looked at them very well, and have discovered yesterday that 3 of them are Renault plugs, the 4th is a Gurtner. Will see if I can get them to spark again which shouldn't be a problem but as they have M18 x 1,5 thread I can always install a set of modern long reach plugs. Here are the pictures. Regards Marcel The adapter for the new flywheel Splined bushing This will be fitted to the clutch disc
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