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Cel

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Everything posted by Cel

  1. Hi Dan Great stuff on your website! I would like to see a picture of your dragline. Don't want to derail this thread so if you like you can send it by pm. Have you made any progress with the transmission and engine of the Halley? Thanks Marcel
  2. There is one at the museum in Meaux as well, here is a link to a picture: http://les-renault-d-avant-guerre.xooit.com/t2784-LE-MATERIEL-MILITAIRE-RENAULT.htm Marcel
  3. The grease gun method usually works very well but I guess you have considered this already. Good luck with it! Marcel
  4. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    I decided to have a go at removing the first cam this evening. The cotter pin came out quite easily, and so did the cam. The next ones will follow later on this week. The gearbox looks quite good inside. Regards Marcel
  5. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    I had a look in the parts book, and luckily the impeller is of the type that can be machined. So next thing to do is to make a drawing and order the materials. I will also make a new shaft as the original one is badly pitted. Regards Marcel
  6. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Thanks for that! I took the water pump apart this evening. Besides the broken crankshaft surprise that you have seen earlier, there was the missing impeller surprise! The body was full of grease instead. I then quickly dismantled the oil pump in order to be sure that it was not missing the gears:D Luckily gearbox and differential are complete! Regards Marcel
  7. Don't know why the second picture uploaded, but this one is not available anymore. It was for sale a couple years ago and if it had been closer I would have bought it. Marcel
  8. This one is for sale in France, but it doesn't look the right one. I'll keep my eyes open for you as they pop up once in a while. Regards Marcel
  9. The blog has been completed, see here: http://parcoursdufront1917.wordpress.com/category/en-guise-de-conclusion/ After over 800 kilometers he was exhausted and an accident happened where his co-driver suffered a dislocation in his left arm. He then decided to stop at Verdun. Fuel consumption was 52 litres to 100 km and engine oil consumption about 2 litres to 100 km. Water consumption decreased by the use of a rubber fan belt instead of a leather one. Regards Marcel
  10. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Work is continuing on the Peugeot. Dad is cleaning the gearbox which is looking very nice, I'll post pictures of that later. We are cleaning the engine so assembly can begin. Once the crankshaft is in I will start machining the new flywheel. The gear pump still looks in good condition and will only need a good cleaning. There is a try cock on the bottom of the sump with a piece of pipe until overflow level. I wonder whether the engine needs to run to try the oil level as it seems like a small amount of oil. The engine also has a float level that is connected to the magneto shut off. If the level is low it will put the mag to the ground and stop the engine. We took out the camshaft as well and will fit new ball bearings. The cam lobes are splined to a straight shaft and held in place by a cotter pin. Four cams will have to come off so we can replace the center bearing. Also worked on the exhaust manifold which is about ready. Here are some pictures. Regards Marcel
  11. I was thinking exactly the same. An Allis B has hub reductions. Same goes for a Unimog axle. Marcel
  12. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Looks like they are roller bearings, I will post pictures when they come out of the wheel. Marcel
  13. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    There is a flat surface milled on the shaft as you can see in one of the pictures. Behind the screw is a washer that cannot rotate because of the flat surface and has two threaded holes to receive the setscrews. See picture below. The piston ring is just compressed by the jaws, that is why the slot is cut in the jig.
  14. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    My father found piston rings at a very reasonable price, but we have to put two of them per groove and the radial thickness is 3,8mm while the grooves are only 3,2mm. Instead of making the grooves deeper (and the pistons weaker) I preferred to modify the rings which turned out well. They seem to loose some of the original pressure but I don't think that is a problem. The ring is compressed in a jig that was machined to the engine bore, clamped in the lathe and machined to a thickness of 3mm. Before and after Best regards Marcel
  15. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    We took off the rear wheels yesterday. Just had to make a tool for the screw that holds the wheel on the axle. I wonder why there is a radial setscrew on this one? It is impossible to get at it when it is in the wheel. The other one has two radial setscrews. Very little effort was needed to get the wheels off. I will post pictures of the bearings once we have them out and cleaned. The brake assembly; all the parts are loose and will only need a good cleaning and possibly new lining.
  16. Looks like the trip has come to an end in Verdun, after 800+ kilometers. His goal of arriving there on 11-11-2011 at 11 o' clock seems to have been reached. As I understand it one of the reasons for stopping the journey is the bad weather. I cannot find more details at the moment, but he says he will complete the blog when he returns home, I will post a brief translation here. Hats off!! So how about the convoy, have any plans been made yet? It would be nice to drive down the Voie Sacrée with as much vehicles as possible. Regards Marcel
  17. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    Thanks for the responses! Steve, I have considered these methods as well, and if I don't find suitable rings I will indeed fabricate them myself. Will contact the UK suppliers first though. I have asked the supplier that sent the wrong rings if he can eventually deliver two rings of each 3mm per groove, what do you guys think of this? Here are the pictures that I couldn't upload yesterday: Gearbox cover, what a shame that it will disappear under the floor:-D: Frame before disassembly: Regards Marcel
  18. Cel

    WW1 Peugeot

    We finally completed the Hanomag project and rolled the Peugeot into the workshop so it can be disassembled further. I had the piston rings delivered last week, but they sent me the wrong ones and now say they cannot deliver what I need. The groove depth is 3,2mm so I need rings with 3mm thickness, they tell me that they can deliver 3,6mm and I would have to cut the grooves deeper. The piston wall is about 7mm. I would rather not do that and continue the search for the right rings, any ideas on this? The remains of the exhaust damper are in good condition, only need a new shell The propshaft coupling will receive a new shaft and bushings I can't seem to upload the other pictures I wanted to post, will retry tomorrow. Regards Marcel
  19. Here's another one in France, unfortunately I don't have more details. Marcel
  20. Give me one more year, and I'll join the convoy as well! Marcel
  21. Cel

    New Zealand MT

    Yes, they were built in Antwerp and used the Knight slide valve engine. My grandfather used to have one but during WW2 the germans took it and drove it in a ditch after 2 miles, total loss. In the fifties Minerva made the licence Landys. Marcel
  22. Very nice picture! It is post-1918 as the tractor has the full radiator sides instead of the ladder style ones, and 7 spoke wheels instead of 6. There is some interesting reading on the early Fordson MOM (Ministry of Munitions) here: http://gasengine.farmcollector.com/Tractors/The-REAL-Fordson-Part-III-MYSTERIOUS-MOM-MYTH-September-1987-1.aspx Marcel
  23. Tony: yes it is sprung, leaf spring under the axle. David: I wrote a letter to the army museum a few months ago but haven't received a reply yet. Maybe now I have it home I can try it again with better pictures. 79x100: I have no idea but will ask my uncle who was in the army for over 30 years. If I find out more I'll keep you all updated! Regards Marcel
  24. Wheel diameter 1,3m Case L x W x H = 2,7 x 1,2 x 1,1m Marcel
  25. It might indeed be later than WW1 and even WW2, but I am sure that it is original. The condition of the wood does not say a lot to me when speaking of age. I have a horse powered threshing machine that is 100+ years old in original and condition, the wood is even better than this cart. Sure hope to find out more about it! Thanks, Marcel
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