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Pavy8

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About Pavy8

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    Sergeant
  • Birthday 08/18/1989

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    Ohio, USA
  1. Yep, can't un-read that.. lol jk. It's good too have a 'running' schedule for all equipment and vehicles that don't get used regularly. We do it every other weekend, anything that hadn't been used since the last 'run day'. Start it up, let it idle for a few minutes, pull or press the throttle a few times, short drive (if applicable), let it cool down and put it away. Works way better than fuel stabilizer alone in the winter. I have gotten some weird looks from the neighbors driving our zero-turn mower in the snow...
  2. I understood the lend lease version to be the 'Smith & Wesson Model 10' chambered in S&W .38/200. The 200 is referring to the grain of the bullet, the Enfield No.2 Mk.I and Webley Mk.IV were also chambered in the .38/200. The 'victory' nickname came from the V prefix to the serial number. The US military also used large numbers the Model 10 in WWII only chambered in .38 special instead. The US model 10 was standard issue to Navy and Marine corps pilots, as well as many second line soldiers. Before WWII the US military had used a much less refined version of the Model 10 under the guise of 'Hand Ejector Model of 1899 (.38 Long Colt)' in the campaign against the Spanish in the Philippines. Reports ere that the .38 long colt was underpowered or military service. A good number of Model 10's, as the more familiar 'Military and Police' were acquired before, during and after the Great War, in the then newish .38 Special. They USUALLY found less interesting uses such as factory guards and the like, but they did make their way around occasionally. I do agree though definitely NOT a 'S&W Victory Model' haha. The whole 'Victory Model' thing confused me as a kid, and I thought some others might want clearing up.
  3. I had considered that also. I have yet to be inside a GATO class, I just wasn't sure where the spare torpedo's were stored in relation to the tubes, or what on board system was used to move them from storage to the tubes (I've tried looking at schematics but the writing is too small even for me too read haha) I figured the use of an internal combustion crane truck on a submerged naval vessel was outlandish at best :-P.
  4. Does it look small enough to possibly fit in a GATO class submarine as well? It wouldn't make much sense to me to have and air craft carrier piece at a submarine exhibit :nut:. Although stranger things have happened (especially in Cleveland :-D)
  5. Great couple of videos you have there. Great variety of vehicles! I would venture a guess that these ol' boys are National Guard on maneuvers. Did you get a chance talk to any of them or figure out what they were up too? Interesting to see a few un-armored FMTV's, all that I see here in Ohio have the 'mine-proof' cabs.
  6. found another picture (on deviantArt.com if you can beliee it. haha) SO from KilikRhydin's DeviantArt page ( ), igive you a restored... truck crane thing... this page says last existing (we know that's wrong now lol) built in 1945, and located in Cleveland, Ohio at the USS Cod Museum, which is only about 2 hours north of me, and seeing as I'm already overdue for a visit ;-).
  7. It's Alaska... They can get anything hahaha
  8. HA! I knew I forgot something... It's not 'Truck type' like the DDS, more industrial looking, purpose built. Honestly I cant tell if it was intended for Air force use or Navy Air, the munitions the museum has chosen look like traditional bombs w/o tail fins. looks postwar also but you never know with these things
  9. Im sure there are some of these hiding is barns out there somewhere.. After WWI ended holt came close to going out of business because they tried selling these old artty tractors as agro tractors. as they scrambled to fill the gap, needless to say these tractors didn't serve the farmers need near as well as they served the militarys needs. It was because of this that the Holt Manufacturing and the C.L. Best tractor companies formed to create the Caterpillar Tractor Company (which was already a tademark of best. Just to expand on survivors, I, just today, accidently found another survivor at the 'Museum of Alaskan Transportation & Industry', although I believe this to be a 5-ton model.
  10. just suurfin the internets like usual, stumbled upon this nifty flickr album. not a lot of military vehicles but everything is pretty interesting. The item in question is the 'Hanson Torpedo Truck Crane'. I haven't heard/seen one of these Hanson models before, any one have any insights?
  11. I think these are the 10 ton Holt tractors (front bottom exhaust and number of return wheels), man what I would give to get one of these in the barn ;-P
  12. Great pictures!! I can never get enough greenish plant :-P
  13. Most of the plant that made back to the states seems to have been used for only a short time, being used as 'scabs' temporary filling the gaps left be war production, or were passed to state crews or municipalities. Then these old tired military machines were replaced quickly by the newer machines. Especially here in the Midwest, where most of the worlds heavy plant came from in those days. I've seen a quite a bit old military plant rusting out their retirement in fields and work yards on the back roads here in Ohio.
  14. saw this at the same place i saw the M5 crane (http://hmvf.co.uk/forumvb/showthread.php?39551-Some-Plant-pictures-from-2012&p=375750#post375750) looks to be a M38A1 with a dry chemical unit. I have a book with more information, ill try to dig it up later today.
  15. Was organizing my show pictures from last year and stumbled across these few pictures. The first two are from the Historic Construction Equipment Show in Bowling Green, Ohio First up we have an Allis Chalmers HD-7 with a Baker Dozer Blade. And Second is a LeTourneau Tournapul Model D4 Airborne Scraper. And this last one was taken at a private collection in southern Ohio I was tickled to death to find one of these still in existence, just goes to show you stuffs still out there. Tractor, Crane, 2-ton, M5 The M5 crane was an International T9 crawler paired with a Trackson co. CT-9 Crane
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