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TANKFEST Update: New Arrivals on show...


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The Tank Museum has obtained a collection of vehicles which will be on public display for the first time at TANKFEST.

 

A regular source of acquisitions has historically been through military and Ministry of Defence Channels. This group is no exception, having been released by the Defence Academy at Shrivenham where they formed part of the military teaching collection.

 

“These vehicles have come to the end of their teaching use” explains Museum Curator David Willey. “Primarily the Defence Academy keeps vehicles as they are useful for explaining design theories and changing priorities between different nations at different times in history. Newer models might be used to show technological changes and assist in evaluating the ‘threat’ such vehicles might pose to one’s own forces.”

 

“Over time the MOD have collected a number of captured, gifted and imported vehicles. These have often gone through a process of evaluation with tests and trials and then, often many years later, passing on to teaching establishments or museums.”

 

The vehicles include:

 

bovtm_urutu.jpgURUTU APC. Captured in Iraqi in the first Gulf war that was originally made by the Brazilian firm Engesa. This vehicle was a great sales success with nineteen countries purchasing the armoured personnel carrier. The Museum already holds the Armoured Car version of the vehicle called the Cascaval.

 

 

bovtm_marder.jpgMarder APC: A German Armoured Personnel carrier that entered service in the early 1970’s. The acquisition of the Marder helps the museum complete its line-up of the key Cold War armoured vehicles.

 

 

 

bovtm_432.jpgFV432 APC: The 432 has seen lengthy service with the British Army. One lesser known variant (only 13 were converted) saw the turret of the Fox scout car with its 30mm cannon placed atop the centre of the vehicle. It is hoped the Museum will be able to return this vehicle to running order in the fullness of time.

 

 

bovtm_panhard.jpgPanhard EBR 75: The arrival of an example of the Panhard EBR 75 Armoured car means the Museum has two examples of this innovative design, one with the 75mm gun and one with the 90mm gun. The vehicle was designed for the French Army before WW2 but with the German occupation the designs were hidden and manufacture only began post war.

 

bovtm_king_tiger.jpgIt’s not the first time The Tank Museum has gained from the collection at Shrivenham. In 2006, The Tank Museum acquired a King Tiger which had been captured and held since World War Two. This meant The Tank Museum could display two different variants of this substantial German design.

 

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The Tank Museum has obtained a collection of vehicles which will be on public display for the first time at TANKFEST.

 

A regular source of acquisitions has historically been through military and Ministry of Defence Channels. This group is no exception, having been released by the Defence Academy at Shrivenham where they formed part of the military teaching collection.

 

“These vehicles have come to the end of their teaching use” explains Museum Curator David Willey. “Primarily the Defence Academy keeps vehicles as they are useful for explaining design theories and changing priorities between different nations at different times in history. Newer models might be used to show technological changes and assist in evaluating the ‘threat’ such vehicles might pose to one’s own forces.”

 

“Over time the MOD have collected a number of captured, gifted and imported vehicles. These have often gone through a process of evaluation with tests and trials and then, often many years later, passing on to teaching establishments or museums.”

 

The vehicles include:

 

bovtm_urutu.jpgURUTU APC. Captured in Iraqi in the first Gulf war that was originally made by the Brazilian firm Engesa. This vehicle was a great sales success with nineteen countries purchasing the armoured personnel carrier. The Museum already holds the Armoured Car version of the vehicle called the Cascaval.

 

 

bovtm_marder.jpgMarder APC: A German Armoured Personnel carrier that entered service in the early 1970’s. The acquisition of the Marder helps the museum complete its line-up of the key Cold War armoured vehicles.

 

 

 

bovtm_432.jpgFV432 APC: The 432 has seen lengthy service with the British Army. One lesser known variant (only 13 were converted) saw the turret of the Fox scout car with its 30mm cannon placed atop the centre of the vehicle. It is hoped the Museum will be able to return this vehicle to running order in the fullness of time.

 

 

bovtm_panhard.jpgPanhard EBR 75: The arrival of an example of the Panhard EBR 75 Armoured car means the Museum has two examples of this innovative design, one with the 75mm gun and one with the 90mm gun. The vehicle was designed for the French Army before WW2 but with the German occupation the designs were hidden and manufacture only began post war.

 

bovtm_king_tiger.jpgIt’s not the first time The Tank Museum has gained from the collection at Shrivenham. In 2006, The Tank Museum acquired a King Tiger which had been captured and held since World War Two. This meant The Tank Museum could display two different variants of this substantial German design.

 

 

The Dorset MVT will be on display and the 118th Signals Regiment looking foward to the weekend!:cheesy:

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