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As some people may know. The M1A1 specification vehicle is loaded with toolboxes.

Trouble is mine came with none.

Has anyone got dimensions or even some good photographs of these boxes so I can get new ones made up.

The one that's particularly important at the moment is the small one hidden under the load bed. The bottom is completely rotted out on mine such that it's impossible to tell the depth or the internal dimensions. My fabricator friend is starting work on the rear body of my truck this week and needs information.

It's the one under the lid in the bottom right of the photo below.

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Hi Norman.

 

If the weather permits - I may get up to the farm in the next couple of days - If so I shall take some measurements for you.

 

May be worth looking at the parts list for the M1A1 but I haven't got one. Tootallmike has one.

 

Regards

 

Markheliops

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Thanks Mark,

 

I've looked in TM9-976 and there's a comprehensive list of tools and there locations but no mention of the crane bed tool boxes. The pictures show a completely different arrangement with two longitudinal boxes either side of centre.

Ward Rear.jpg

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And thanks to Vince.

I've been meaning to contact Mike about some other parts he has as well.

 

On another point.

Some of the nuts and studs holding my rear diffs in are badly corroded. Does anyone know whether they are standard studs, threaded each end or wether they are splined and inserted from the rear like Land Rovers?

I want to replace them but don't want to have to remove the diffs if I can help it.

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Thanks again Mark.

 

But are they a standard stud threaded both ends?

I've had to make some up myself for other areas on the brakes. Threads trend to be UNC one end and UNF the other, so can't buy them off the shelf. :-(

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Well we've managed to find the dimensions and extent of the centre toolbox from the remains of weld lines on the original metal.

All that remains to discover now is wether the box out for the rear winch prop is rounded or squared off.

Don't suppose anyones got any pics?

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Not visible in the pictures you sent me Tony.

Have a look at the picture below (not my body), the inverted V shape at the front is to clear the winch propshaft. This shape must continue in some for through the floor of the under bed toolbox just behind. It's the one with a half lid for some reason but the box would seem to extend the full width between chassis rails.

34.jpg

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  • 7 years later...

There has been some previous discussion on this topic, this is my view on the topic.

I base my statements on research I have done thru pictures, TM's and discussions with other WLF owners. The picture/drawing in the TM shows a PLOMB toolbox, even thou a manufacture is not listed, I have a PLOMB toolbox that is spot on to the one represented and was installed on KENWORTH trucks, as PLOMB was based out of Los Angles, CA and Kenworth was based in Seattle , Washington. The toolbox used on the Ward LaFrance is of an unknown manufacture, but for the sake of the of this discussion I will refer to it as the Army Cars Holland toolbox. The reason I state this is that are far as I can tell, all of the WLF that were refurbished by Army Cars (including my truck) had the same box installed, a modern box that looks like the original from the exterior, I cannot tell what the interior looks like as I have not found an interior picture of an original box. The box that was on my truck had several pull out drawers and was originally red in color.

 

After acquiring a PLOMB box, I decided to install it on my truck and outfit it was prescribed in the TM 9-796, page 84. I used a combination of PLOMB, and SK tools. My original box was attached to the bed with carriage bolts. If you look in the TM, you can see a lip on the Plomb box at it's base. I took the liberty of welding an "L" bracket to the box and bolting it to the bed.

 

John G

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That's a PLOMB 9989 from the Plomb 15A catalog, 1936 to 1941, catalog is here;

 

http://bartlettstreet.com/toolcatalogs/

 

The box is right, but in 1942 they changed from PLOMB - LOS ANGELES , to PLOMB - USA, and they stayed that way through to 1948 when they changed to PROTO because of a trademark dispute with PLUMB.

 

A PLOMB 9989A from the 19R catalog would be ideal for applications 1942-45, but the only difference would be the - USA instead of - LOS ANGELES on the lid.

 

All these boxes are rare and expensive now. I have a smaller Plomb box and a pile of the plain Plomb and Plomb WF ( Wright Field contract ) tools made for USAAC / USAAF You will also find Plomb tools marked with PWA ( Pratt & Whitney Aircraft ) Ranger AT ( Fairchild Aviation ) plus various Navy and Naval Air Force variants.

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The jeep was put in there for scale, it gives you an idea how big the Ward is compared to a Jeep!!:wow:

 

But seriously, the Jeep was my sons toy when he was younger, when I go to shows I suspended it from the hook and let kids work the boom to raise and lower it and watch the big grin on their faces!!!!

 

 

John G

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Just above the spare tire(s) is a "lifting eye" that a rope would be put through. I use a forkilft as each tire/wheel weighs in excess of 250 pounds.

 

John G

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Just above the spare tire(s) is a "lifting eye" that a rope would be put through. I use a forkilft as each tire/wheel weighs in excess of 250 pounds.

 

John G

I carry a chain block to use with the lifting shackle located above each spare wheel. That's fine at the roadside but mechanical help is much easier at home!

 

- MG

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I carry a chain block to use with the lifting shackle located above each spare wheel. That's fine at the roadside but mechanical help is much easier at home!

 

- MG

 

Thankyou gentlemen, I have been pondering that for a while, I'm supprised its not shown in the TM.

Thinking about it, the GI's then were a bit smaller,leaner and maybe less well fed than us, arr but they were MUCH younger.

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Here is a bit more M1A1 tool box info, the welding tool box which is mounted on top of the crane tower, presumably as you need to get up there to put the gauges onto the bottles.

 

See the short reference to it at http://g503.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=26&t=159540&hilit=tool+box+kenworth&start=165

 

at the bottom of the page.

 

Enjoy.

Sam.

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