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Bomb damage near Eastbourne E.Sussex


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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
HMVF has done this to me, I can't stop now I've got the bug!

A friend of mine is a Budist monk,he does re birthing and hypnothism for a living i am sure he could help.He cured me of getting the ache with a few people on here:-D

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One for CW, after this bit;

 

Editor's note: Lt-Cdr McEwan was a pioneer airship pilot in the Royal Naval Air Service during the First World War He entered the Royal Navy as a Public Schools entry from Shrewsbury in 1913, aged 19. After serving as a Midshipman in HMS Invincible at the Battle of the Falkland Islands in December 1914, he was appointed to theRoyal Naval Air Service for duties with lighter-than-air craft. He served as an airship pilot from 1915 to 1919, attaining the temporary ranks of Flight-Lieutenant and Captain, Royal Air Force, in addition to his substantive rank as a Lieutenant, Royal Navy . He set an airship endurance record of 25 hours 22 minutes on 26/27 June 1917 from Pulham Airship Station in a North Sea class airship.

 

He also flew a Sea Scout airship to a record height of 10 300 feet from Polegate Airship Station. This record stood even after the War. His total of airship hours flown was one of the highest, being about 2400 hours.

 

here; http://samilitaryhistory.org/vol042am.html

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Guest catweazle (Banned Member)
Any ideas?

No not really ,i know when we were building the victoria line the cement

In the centre of the pile would gradualy get hotter and it would burn your neck when carrying it,of course that was in mens days they were 112 lb not like these H&s bags now.:-D

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Memorial on the Downs above Eastbourne.

 

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The Memorial is almost in the centre of this picture, on the darker green patch. There was just a small clump of trees on the top in those days, and no scrub, except for small patches of gorse, the Downs were sheep shorn turf, with very few fences.

 

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  • 8 years later...

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