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Schwimvagen...


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Schwimvagens

 

Schwimmwagen

 

Kübelwagen

 

Volkswagen

 

The above is just to make sure you're actually buying a Kdf Typ 166. If you don't know what I mean, google "Kooblekar" before you pay up front for a bucket seat people's car.

 

H.

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Schwimmwagen

 

Kübelwagen

 

Volkswagen

 

The above is just to make sure you're actually buying a Kdf Typ 166. If you don't know what I mean, google "Kooblekar" before you pay up front for a bucket seat people's car.

 

H.

 

Quite like the look of those. Look a lot better than the plastic type of kit car conversions usually seen.

Don't see a Schwimmwagen variant though!

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  • 3 months later...

With these sums I think things cease to be a hobby. To my mind the real spirit of everything we do is with, for want of something less cheesey, the founding fathers, who did it all with army surplus kit before there was actually a "hobby". Even if I had won the lottery, I could not see me spending fifty grand on any MV - but I suppose never say never is the rule. My dream fleet does include a few obviously expensive types I probably could not even drive, let alone maintain (don't laugh). So it all becomes academic.

 

MB

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With these sums I think things cease to be a hobby. To my mind the real spirit of everything we do is with, for want of something less cheesey, the founding fathers, who did it all with army surplus kit before there was actually a "hobby". Even if I had won the lottery, I could not see me spending fifty grand on any MV - but I suppose never say never is the rule. My dream fleet does include a few obviously expensive types I probably could not even drive, let alone maintain (don't laugh). So it all becomes academic.

 

MB

 

 

Such as???? :)

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Yes but in the current economic down turn all this sort of stuff will loost value and things will become more readily accesible for the less financially influenced among us.

However tanks and such things willcontinue to make lots of money and i have to admit if mynumbers came up the first thing i would do is bugy a sherman no doubt.

What does everyone else think?

Al

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Unfortunately in economic downturns people with money don't invest in banks, stocks or shares etc. they invest in things likely to increase in value irrespective of the financial sector such as classic vehicles or MV's which then get put in a storage compound and left without being used. This, in turn, drives up the prices of those items left in circulation and so we get locked into a viscous spiral......

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Yes but in the current economic down turn all this sort of stuff will loost value and things will become more readily accesible for the less financially influenced among us.

However tanks and such things willcontinue to make lots of money and i have to admit if mynumbers came up the first thing i would do is bugy a sherman no doubt.

What does everyone else think?

Al

 

HHMMMMM do not agree with this, it seem more of a case of .......

 

money in short supply + [some areas of work in short supply] = high prices to compensate for the possible { lack } of work in the future...talking to some people in the building trade

 

Ashley

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Speaking as somebody in the building trade who has spent a not inconsiderable amount of time over the last year scratching round trying find stuff to keep the staff employed whilst waiting for the phone to ring I completely fail to see the logic of the idiots who put their prices up even further .

 

Oh yes - we're currently earning nothing so lets put the cost of what we do up a bit more .

 

Amazing.

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A friend of mine works in the building trade. When work drys up he buys old MV's (usually for not much money), does them up and sells them on to keep his head afloat.

 

The recession will affect us all in different ways. Although my current job is quite secure, my savings have been wiped out. Now if i had used that money (like i suggested to my wife) to buy a half track and an ambulance it would at least have been safe. I dont think it would necesserily leap up in value in the short term, but in a few years time it would be worth a bit more than i paid for it.

 

Lots of people bought classic cars as an investment in the 80's and they mostly got their fingers burned. I dont think there are many people deliberately buying MV's as an investment (although there are the odd exception of course). Some undoubtedly do go up in value but there are so many Jeeps (for example) around they will never leap up in such a way to attract the serious investor.

 

In my opinion.

 

Tim (too)

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Parallels with Classic Cars.

This used to be my main hobby, having owned a Spitfire and a TR6 and briefly a pre-war Standard. Over the past 9 years the prices have stayed roughly static bar a little for inflation, but over the last 6 months things have started to change.... Your run of the mill classic has stayed static if not dropped slightly for poor condition examples BUT the good condition cars and higher price bracket vehicles such as E-types and the like have been climbing upwards, even some of 60's Triumphs are starting to climb.

It has been put down to investment - if you are investing you want a 'like new' usable 'fancy' vehicle. e.g. If you have £45,000 why leave it in the bank when you can buy a good E-Type and enjoy it.

Personally I can't fully draw parallels with MVs as MVs aren't that usable and don't have the same wide appeal as for instance a 60's Sports car.

As soon as we talk WW2 armour, that is a different story, parallels there lie firmly with the Vintage Sports Car people, whom 85% are Millionaires. I know some who are regular* guys, but they are few and far between, mainly having entered into the hobby well before the cars became popular and expensive.

*Own farms with shops and deal in cash :-)

 

I remember back in Normandy 94, one of the M5 Stuarts had a gearbox failure, the guys were stripping it out and a reconditioned replacement was being overnight shipped from the UK down to a field in Normandy to fix it! No..I thought..I haven't got that kind of money:-\

 

PS the M5 owner owned an Industrial Estate in the Midlands - ah, that's where he got all the money:idea:

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  • 3 months later...

I think the schwimm you are talking about is the one my boss now owns, yes it was a lot of money, over twice the cost of our DUKW BUT A LOT MORE FUN, but look at it this way he wanted a schwimm, and yes he is a sucessful buisness man, (started in a garden shed 18 years ago) and he has worked hard for it, now he wants to have fun, he could have bought a Bently or any of the top marque cars and stuck it in a garage but he decided to buy an amphibious vehicle, the DUKW when I asked why he said why not.

I dont think it matters what you have, how much it cost, or how you use it, just enjoy it.

Plus side is it got me from airshows to something I can drive (DUKW driver) and now I own my first MV ( munga ) and yes from our experiance of our business people do take money from the bank in invest in vehicles.

 

Danny (Have fun don't bitch )

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