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Nazi T34 recovered from swamp


da bomb

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The German's first started using other peoples tanks during the Great War. They were right magpies for other peoples kit, a lot of French tanks were stripped of there turrets which were then put onto bunkers. Chezc 4.7 cm anti tank guns were also used all along the Atlantic wall. russian guns were used in the Channel islands, the biggest being the 305mm ex St Petersburg guns used in the Mirus Battery. Renault tanks were also issued to the Channel Islands, the only Panzer regiment never to see action.

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Got to be a hoax, far too clean to have been submereged for any time, ...amazing how all the tracks and slewing brakes apparently still work when it was being towed, how did a driver get in, it would have been full of mud !....I don't think so!!!!

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I read something recently about a vehicle recovered from a lake, the parts submerged in silt and boggy goo were like new, even down to paint and wood surviving, so i guess it could be conceivable, the first clip shows the tracks frozen, but i suppose the weight would overcome alot of seizure and grease lasts a long time.

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The German's first started using other peoples tanks during the Great War. They were right magpies for other peoples kit, a lot of French tanks were stripped of there turrets which were then put onto bunkers. Chezc 4.7 cm anti tank guns were also used all along the Atlantic wall. russian guns were used in the Channel islands, the biggest being the 305mm ex St Petersburg guns used in the Mirus Battery. Renault tanks were also issued to the Channel Islands, the only Panzer regiment never to see action.

 

I was talking to an ex-SS man about this kind of thing. He said that they used T34 tanks in training to familiariae themselves with how to attack the tanks, and where the blind spots were. He couldn't recollect any actually used in combat.

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The German's first started using other peoples tanks during the Great War. They were right magpies for other peoples kit, a lot of French tanks were stripped of there turrets which were then put onto bunkers. Chezc 4.7 cm anti tank guns were also used all along the Atlantic wall. russian guns were used in the Channel islands, the biggest being the 305mm ex St Petersburg guns used in the Mirus Battery. Renault tanks were also issued to the Channel Islands, the only Panzer regiment never to see action.

 

 

A side benefit of the German invasion of Czechoslovakia was that they acquired enough Skoda tanks to re-equip four Light Divisions as Panzer Divisions, giving them ten Panzer divisions instead of six. The tanks became PzKpfw35(T) - for Tscheschich = Czech - and PzKpfw 38(T). Had this not happened, Rommel would have commanded 7 Light Division rather than 7 Panzer Division and not become the great Panzer general many now consider him to have been.

 

The 35(T)s and 38(T)s may not have been the most up-to-date tanks in the world, but Skoda was a great marque in those days prior to being run by Commies throughout the Cold War and the chassis remained good throughout the war. The 38(T) chassis was re-used as the light Jagdpanzer Hetzer (Beaver or a meringue?) which was extremely will received (or not, depending which side you were on).

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Thers has been many reports of vehicles recovered from lakes in Eastern Europe, that were found to be in very good condition. Due the cold and silting effects the oxygen level in the water is low and it slows or even stops the effects of corrosion and rotting of the wooden parts. Both CMV and MMI have reported on this a number of times within the last year.

 

 

Baz.

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Heck of a lot of work to go for a hoax. I still think that it is plausible. It is non sea water and boggy ponds are great for preserving things. Consider those bodies they dug up from a peat bog in Anglesea. 2000 years old, but incredibly well preserved.

 

Tim (too)

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water and slit create an-aerobic conditions which slows the decay and rot process to a near stand still look at roman jettys and moorings that have been found in rivers that are made of wood that have been perfect preserved, metal is the same as wood the problem is when oxygen gets to it the metal reacts and corrsion begins

 

not bad for failing A-level archaeology lol

 

also if you look at the end of the first vid the tracks arent moving it is been dragged because there is no moment in the tracks on the first vid

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Heck of a lot of work to go for a hoax. I still think that it is plausible. It is non sea water and boggy ponds are great for preserving things. Consider those bodies they dug up from a peat bog in Anglesea. 2000 years old, but incredibly well preserved.

 

Tim (too)

 

Bog bodies actually rely on the acid in the water. It pickles them.
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Who in his right, or even very twisted,mind would stage a hoax like this? Come on!-driving a perfectly good original WW2 tank, worth 100.000's of dollars, into a lake, immersing it completely in water and mud, just to pull it out again?

I just saw a WW2 German recovery truck having been recovered from a Russian lake. The parts that had been embedded in mud were perfectly preserved, the front had been in the water and was far worse off with rust.

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

As always,

 

Goran N

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If you checkout detectorweb.cz there is plenty of evidence that they are pulling out vehicles preserved like this one through out old Russia ,Poland etc but those that are in water are not so well preserved but still with in restoration capabilities (read cash)

It is the mud that preserves them as well as the cold atmosphere.

 

 

 

Ashley

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This a genuine recovery of a T34/76 from somewhere in eastern europe. The thing has been touted round quite a bit and I managed to stop The Sun publishing it as a Tiger tank discovery last year. I think the film is two to three years old and could be from Russia, the Czech Rep or Slovakia. A brain will know. I get the impression the film is either just repeated or re-edited. It is a great story.

 

The Germans did use T34s when they had to, especially in the latter stages in places like Yugoslavia. The Germans would never ignore useful kit.

 

MB

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