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Green Hornet, used for scrambled comms bettween Churchill and Rossevelt. The system was never brocken.

 

 

Nope, nothing as exciting as that, but failure of this machine once it was in service could have had catastrophic consequences for the functioning of the British Army.

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It's the pay corp computer!!

 

 

Yes it is indeed well done Tony. I suppose it was me saying "failure would have catastrophic consequences for the functioning of the British Army".

 

With a struggle one could work out the shoulder flash as Royal Army Pay Corps. But the big clue is that it is not a screwdriver in this man's hand. It is a pencil, this man is a pencil pusher, none the less performing an important task.

 

This was the launch of a £3.5 million computer of the RAPC Electronic Accounting Development Unit at Worthy Down, Hampshire in 1961.

 

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Oh quite modrn then, despite IBMs claims The fort had computers in the erly 1950's and the first Electronic Programmable computer, with a hard memory was developed at Manchester university in 1957. Poor old Tom Flowers has never had the fame he rightly deserves.

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A bit of useless info regarding early computors in the UK,

 

The first office computor in the UK was developed by J. Lyons & Co., of Teashop and Bakery fame, it was tried out for the first time in 1951. Called LEO for Lyons Office Computor, it was that successful that they were built for other companies afterwards.

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IBM International Business Machines, originally made mechanical tally machines. Then were given the blue prints of Colossus as war payments along with such things as the Blackburn supersonic aircraft, that bears a striking resemblance to Bell X1. Univac was a colossus clone, not an original invention as claimed.

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I THOUGHT ALIEN WOULD OF GOT THIS ONE.

 

BARRY

 

 

I only just got here. A couple of weeks ago I linked a picture somewhere on HMVF of myself in 1988 in the Honour Guard for the visit of the Adjutant General to open his new Computer Centre next door to the old one at Worthy Down north of Winchester. It had everything, including cooling towers to cool the water-cooled mainframes.

 

Many years ago I read that mainframes had wiped out the ecology of San Francisco Sound because they were pumping 95 million tons of hot water from cooling mainframes into the sound every day, while the sound is naturally cold, being fed by the Humboldt Current.

 

IBM sometime thereafter started air-cooling their mainframes and in 1997 I started working on mainframes with IBM at Hursley, just the other side of Winchester. If I sit in D West and peer over the dividing screen, out of the window and squint through the trees, I can the machine wing of D Block which, according to our Lab Director, contains half of the MIPS (Millions of Instructions Per Second) of IBM EMEA.

 

Whereas as soon as I left the RAPC in 1989 they replaced their mainframes with distributed systems, rendering the cooling towers obsolete.

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