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Daimler Armoured Car Block repair.


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Metallock or similar should do it.  The internal thickness is liable to vary - cracks tend to appear at change of section thickness, but it should fix.

The operative will need to clean the whole surface down and crack check it.  Those cracks are liable to be longer than you can see, and there could be more of them.  It is possible that there are internal cracks in the water jacket which would be more difficult but still now impossible.

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At one time it would have been a common stitch repair, problem now is finding someone who can do it and do it well.

The newer option is laser welding, apparently it very good as it doesn’t heat the block unevenly causing further cracks. I’ve not had any experience of this type of repair.

 

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In the first instance I am trying to find a methodolgy that can be used without a full engine rebuild.    This is a brand new engine which the previous owner did not drain properly after last running it.  The tradional method used by this company putting the Block in an oven would preclude this.

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Metalock is a purely mechanical repair that can be done in situ.  I had a GMC 270 block fixed in the truck, but they do need reasonable access, of course.

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58 minutes ago, REME 245 said:

In the first instance I am trying to find a methodolgy that can be used without a full engine rebuild.    This is a brand new engine which the previous owner did not drain properly after last running it.  The tradional method used by this company putting the Block in an oven would preclude this.

Neil,

Try Surelock, https://www.castingrepairs.com/about-us

I met this chap at Beaulieu once when I had a similar issue with a customer's engine, he explained his methods and you can see some of his work in a video on his website. You have cracks radiating from the main crack so it is worth getting the job done by a specialist. No heat involved and usually can be done in situ and without dismantling. He also said that once done he has a system of pumping a ceramic solution through the block to seal it. As it was I did not get the block done as I was able to locate a replacement. I have had minor cracks stitched on other engines by a company in your area, called Cox and Turner (near Yeovil).

Another concern is if there are cracks on the inner side of the block.

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2 hours ago, REME 245 said:

In the first instance I am trying to find a methodolgy that can be used without a full engine rebuild.    This is a brand new engine which the previous owner did not drain properly after last running it.  The tradional method used by this company putting the Block in an oven would preclude this.

Is the block  'wet-linered'    ?    , if it is - fully dismantle and off to a specialist for material analysis.  IMHO - stoving and a peened weld would be best.

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51 minutes ago, ruxy said:

Is the block  'wet-linered'    ?    , if it is - fully dismantle and off to a specialist for material analysis.  IMHO - stoving and a peened weld would be best.

Daimler engines did not have wet liners

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