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Type of wood for vehicle flooring


Meekumslr
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5 hours ago, Rootes75 said:

We are off to our local timber yard in the next couple of weeks to have a look through their offcuts barns, I am going for Ash for the bed of our truck but with so many other hardwoods that they have we may look at some others if they are a little cheaper.

Lets face it, our trucks won't be doing hard graft or carrying heavy loads anymore so any hardwood would probably do depending upon its availability.

I’d be keen to know what your final decision and choice is, if you could let me know.

Im going to the local truck breakers tomorrow so will let you know how that goes.

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When I get a bit more time I'll try & put more of the EMER up. As it is it gives an interesting insight into the sphere of influence of the British Army & its engagement with countries that no longer exist, at least under some of those names.

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The subject of the supply of timber was first highlighted in 1940 as the builders of bodies  for trucks and trailers  could not keep up with the demand. Mainly due to the lack of supply from postwar countries that now were occupied  the short fall was to be made up with supplies from CANADA and mainly  hardwoods and Douglas fir softwood for floors and sides . Home grown stocks of timber were to be felled to this end a Canadian unit of lumberjacks were sent to the uk to  help. Also both hardwood and soft wood were used as flooring the thickness was different between hard and soft   hard wood was to be  1 1/4 soft wood 1 1/2 the British government  drew up the specifications. As to the painting of floors trucks G/S and trailers due to shortages it was only metal floors that were to be painted  as a rust protection

 

 

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31 minutes ago, wally dugan said:

The subject of the supply of timber was first highlighted in 1940 as the builders of bodies  for trucks and trailers  could not keep up with the demand. Mainly due to the lack of supply from postwar countries that now were occupied  the short fall was to be made up with supplies from CANADA and mainly  hardwoods and Douglas fir softwood for floors and sides . Home grown stocks of timber were to be felled to this end a Canadian unit of lumberjacks were sent to the uk to  help. Also both hardwood and soft wood were used as flooring the thickness was different between hard and soft   hard wood was to be  1 1/4 soft wood 1 1/2 the British government  drew up the specifications. As to the painting of floors trucks G/S and trailers due to shortages it was only metal floors that were to be painted  as a rust protection

 

 

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Wally,

That’s very useful matey.

Im going to fit whatever comes along providing it’s 1 1/4” hard or 1 1/2 soft.

Thanks.

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  • 2 weeks later...

After Wallys post earlier in the thread, I am going to price up softwood aswel as Ash for the floor of our truck, it will never be fully loaded and she will be stored inside undercover.

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Redwood  (European Pine) is not to be sniffed at and is more durable than many softwoods , it can be further improved by VacVac treatment which when dry takes paint OK.    Scandanavian / Russian/Baltic  "Unsorted" is the best followed by 4ths & 5ths  -  all good joinery.

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