Jump to content

Willys Hotchkiss m201 companion flange nut won't budge


Recommended Posts

Hi Gents

I am trying to remove the companion flange nut from the universal front end yoke and it won't budge.

I have hired and used an impact gun but it still won't move, any suggestions please.

Steve

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Assuming you have been turning the correct direction , and a 1/2" dr. breaker bar like the one suggested gives no success.

Most air / battery/ mains impact wrenches are next to useless , you may have been hired a pup.   I doubt if they hire out a  MAC or Snap-on   1/2" dr. gun that costs  £300+  

You may have to take it to a garage , I doubt if it needs 3/4" dr.  however a commercial garage should shift it for a small £fee.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking on YouTube and seeing other companion flange nuts removed/fitted they are not left hand thread?, as the transfer case is still on the jeep it would be difficult to get the breaker bar onto the nut?, I'm loath to remove the transmission to take it to the garage I may have to source a stronger impact wrench and hope that shifts it!?.

Thanks guys for you suggestions.

Steve.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If there’s no room to use a breaker bar, is there someway to brace a Long wrench against the frame and then with the vehicle in gear, roll it to use gear box torque to help? Mine came off with very little effort so never had to investigate alternative removal methods. You could also try some heat, a normal butane lamp would do it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Thanks I will give that a go (how long should I apply the the heat?), also if all else fails would it be recommended to maybe grind  the sides of the nut with a dremel disc and source a new nut?.

Edited by steev
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, steev said:

Thanks I will give that a go (how long should I apply the the heat?), also if all else fails would it be recommended to maybe grind  the sides of the nut with a dremel disc and source a new nut?.

That would be the best option ,  Dremel / die-grinder  - remove most of metal then hit a slot with a blunt chisel & lump hammer to spread / split.

Torches - I would lag around with plumbers asbestos mats (not B&Q , proper thick ones) and scraps of sheet asbestos.   A propane torch with a microbore nozzel  (Sievert or Bullfinch  abt.  3/8" or next size up) , heat in quick and out.  You may be better using a  MAP gas container torch.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Actually - if you remove most of metal using stones or a small carbide burr , two places  180 degree apart - then a cold chisel without heat will split it apart easy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

You could try jacking veicle up. Arrange a long bar to rest on the floor jammed against something, and gently lower vehicle.

All you need to do is start it.

The other if all else fails is with the transmission disconnected from drive. Wedge a bar on flick starter to turn the engine and transmission allowing bar to bang against something hard.

Edited by Tony B
Link to post
Share on other sites

Ive managed to shift it- cut a piece of galvanized tube and used it as an extension and to my surprise and relief it worked!!!!.

thanks to you all for your suggestions which i will no doubt use in some capacity in the future.

Steve

20210504_194223.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

This was my first attempt at removing the nut on the track idler post on my M3 halftrack. It bent the 1800NM torque wrench! I had to upgrade to a 3000NM which eventually got the nut off with little effort.

D34B8EAB-FDB7-4C12-9C0B-14314CEB1B09.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lesson learnt! You never use a torque wrench to undo something. It nearly always needs more torque to undo. I have had to undo flange nuts on earthmover axles and you have to use a torque multiplier on them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

These wrenches are used by the RAF to undo aircraft components as we can’t use torque multipliers, impact tools or electrical tooling, I guess because serious damage has happened in the past.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...