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Land Rover corrosion


MartinN
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The received wisdom is that Gordon's advice is about the best you can do, short of replacing panels, but you are only slowing the process.  I quote from another of the afflicted! ......."Problem exists in all areas where the ally connects with steel (e.g. door skins and door frame). The ONLY solution is to take everything apart, prime or Hammerite all steel, and then replace affected ally with new panels. Good luck pal !"

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Is it a localized area , norm of door bottoms , SW back door , wing attachment point(s) to bulkhead, tub to chassis mountings  ?  FFR tubs at side due to steels (reinforcement for antenna mountings) this through panel corrosion that is highly visible is not a problem on a basic.  Differing problems - different approach.   A specialist aluminium etch may be OK , however alloy needs grip more than anything , that means a fairly course abrasive (this also removes the oxide that leads to failure) .  I have found this , even using a cellulose primer / primer filler followed by de-nib is very sound (even after 40 years).

                  S2A  would be almost certainly Birmabright  BB2 grade,   all of S3 years the alloy had a few microns of coating (best protection, don't disturb) , on shattered paint - you will see this as a yellow,gold,greenish tinge  (it is not anodising , somebody once advised it was alondising  (as that particular process the term now is - I doubt it is).  This bloke was in the aero industry and I believe I have seen this material.

Some say Defenders are thinner stuff (I don't doubt , and I suspect the coating may be deleted.  Ford sort of sorted SW doors by cladding with zinc coated steel sheet.  Any skins will be just soft aluminium ,  therefore a local perforating pitting repair using fibre glass chopped mat mix (from a tin) would be more permanent. 

If this problem is over all panels , they I would guess a P.O.  has in the past stripped to bare metal and used a unsuitable primer or with bad prep.

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ALOCROM   ,   that is the stuff - just Google searched -  in the USA it is known as Alodine    -   hence I stated  the process Alondising , I should have spelt - Alodising..      I always avoid sanding through this coating unless there is damage in the area.  It seems common throughout the aircraft industry - so must be good anti-corrosion.

https://www.poeton.co.uk/standard-treatments/alocrom-alodine/

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