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Post-War British Army Clothing Questions


Pedantic_Potato
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I have little understanding of uniforms & of their various types. But suffice it to say that the types of shirts of interest in this thread are not included in the catalogues I have. In fact shirts only occupy 2 pages yet trousers & trews fill 15 pages.

Of the shirts covered, sizing is based purely on collar size & although they are all NATO codified, the sizes are in inches or centimetres, they have not yet been NATO sized.

By way of interest to the clothing enthusiasts following the thread here are some old numerical sizes derived from imperial measurements, that are again NATO codified but not NATO sized.

1236144863_Uniformsizes(Medium).thumb.jpg.6e5556ef2486710420e0fa6782b2abbf.jpg

 

 

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Thanks for that primary source, Clive!

I do wonder if the whole army metrified at the same time or did so gradually across different garments/production runs such as that seen with 1968 Pattern Combat Smocks having imperial numbered sizes linked to NATO metric measurements. 

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As you realise clothing is not my speciality, but I do appreciate primary sources are so much more valuable than an opinion found by googling!

Although this is as REME document it outlines Government policy and how it was to be implemented by the MOD.

1858223052_EMERManZ101(Large).thumb.jpg.394970d9ea1617109b7b3010f45c34c3.jpg

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Don't forget that policies are rarely implemented in whole or on schedule. The venerable L1A1 Self-Loading Rifle 
(SLR) was introduced in 1954 in a NATO-approved metric calibre (7.62 x 51 mm). Ironically, many of the SLR's parts were specified in imperial (i.e. inch) measure, hence the Americans referred to the SLR as an "inch FN" (FN being Fabrique Nationale, the Belgian designer) to differentiate it from the non-Commonwealth variants

If you convert 7.62 mm into inches you get 0.3, which begs the question of how metric was metrication anyway. 

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  • 7 months later...

Khaki Drill Kilts. 

Worn by Scottish Regiments in tropical climates. From Victorian times till when? 

Were they withdrawn enemas or one at a time as soldiers returned to UK. 

BillyH

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10 hours ago, BillyH said:

Khaki Drill Kilts. 

Worn by Scottish Regiments in tropical climates. From Victorian times till when?

 

Well they are not listed in Clothing Regulations 1953 Pamphlet No.4 . Only these:

Kilts, Highland (regimental pattern)

Kilts, Saffron

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