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I don't think that the relevant Statutory Instrument has been laid yet but I am watching out for it.

 

When I rebuilt my Scammell Contractor I put ten new tyres on it.  I now have to buy two new ones but as the size is 1200 R 24 I have no use for the old ones.

 

Remember when you buy new one, make sure that you know the date of manufacture. You don't want ones with only eight years life left!

 

It would be very useful for my day job to know of any problems being experienced with getting tyres with sufficient 'life' left in them.

 

John

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  • 2 weeks later...

According to the Gov.uk website, vehicles that are exempt from MoT testing and registered as Historic Vehicle  and not used commercially will be exempt from this regulation. But as I own a Leyland Daf, I will have to buy 2 new steer tyres, if I can find any suitable ones.

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Dear All,

I am very keen on acquiring information as to what people are doing to comply with the new regulation.  Does anyone have a quote for new 1500 or 1600 R 20 of either Michelin or Far East manufacture. All those with AEC militants,  Foden EKA Compacts or DROPS will need new front tyres.

I fear that private operators of HGVs will be the only ones to be adversely affected.  On a commercially operated HGV, the tyres don't stay in service for 10 years.  One operator said to me "If only we could get a tyre to last 10 years!". Reputable coach operators don't own their tyres.  They have a contract with a tyre company.  Only operators at the bottom of the market own their own tyres (as did the operator of the coach that crashed on the A3).

Private HGV operators cover very low mileages and so our insurance costs are very low.  The cost of the tyres will be far more than the cost of the insurance which, amongst other things, covers all the costs of accidents.

There will be two very bad road safety effects of this new regulation.  In my opinion and experience, a Michelin tyre will last indefinitely and will always be better than a Far Eastern tyre.  However, because of this regulation, I am sure that many will have no choice but to remove the perfectly good Michelin tyres from the front axle and replace them with a Far Eastern one.   When I rebuilt my Scammell Contractor, I fitted new tyres all round.  Two of them will now have to be replaced after about 5000 miles at the most.  If someone was doing the same project again, they might not fit new tyres because of the possibility, left open by the Government, that ALL the tyres might have to be less than ten years old.

On the issue of remoulds, I know that this was carefully considered but I cannot remember what the arguments were!

 

John

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Here is the response to the consultation etc. 

For remoulds it refers to the UNECE standards and that it would be more practical to accept the quality of remoulds and use the remanufacture date.

Also for historic vehicles exemption is based on the MOT requirement and not the rolling 40 year old tax break.

An interesting read..

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/banning-tyres-aged-10-years-and-older/outcome/government-response-to-the-consultation-to-ban-tyres-aged-10-years-or-older

Edited by Mk3iain
should be better at proof reading
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17 minutes ago, radiomike7 said:

Some good points there John, as I read it a DROPS would need four front tyres and in the case of the IMM Foden they are over £3k each.

That will put many vehicles off the road I suspect, and unsaleable (from now).

The implementation period is 3 months from introduction as they are keen to move on this.  I expect that will mean it will not be acceptable for historic vehicles to wait until next MOT but will be required within the implementation period. As this is fairly high profile roadside checks can be expected and traffic police and DVSA inspectors will be very aware.

Its a hard hit !

Edited by Mk3iain
should be better at proof reading
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Also be aware this regulation applies to a 'Minibus'.  I've had two Humber Pigs that were registered as a Minibus, on my last Pig a few years ago I realised that this category was inappropriate & with time perhaps stricter rules might apply to things like seat belts or tyres. Besides I don't carry passengers & runflat tyres have high durability.

When I changed the category on the V5C, I was asked to justify this change. The Humber Pig was introduced as an armoured truck for various roles with RAC, RA, RS, Infantry. The UHB makes only mention of "the passenger seat", the rear is described as the cargo compartment.

I took a picture of my cargo compartment & that shown in the UHB. I stated that I had removable seating in the rear compartment that was for display purposes. These bench seats were not fixed & were not used for transporting passengers, as it would be unsafe to do so.

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On 11/10/2020 at 3:12 PM, radiomike7 said:

I'm surprised they have not gone a step further and banned remoulds on the front axle where there is no knowing how old the carcass is.

They are banning remoulds on steer axles and not before time.  My middle brother had a remould fitted to the front axle of his artic without his knowledge, this remould blew out as he was leaving a services on the M1 luckily he was  still accelerating and no damage was done, it could have been a lot worse as he had a full tank of methanol as a load.

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14 hours ago, johnwardle said:

They are banning remoulds on steer axles and not before time.  My middle brother had a remould fitted to the front axle of his artic without his knowledge, this remould blew out as he was leaving a services on the M1 luckily he was  still accelerating and no damage was done, it could have been a lot worse as he had a full tank of methanol as a load.

In the consultation response they are not banning remoulds on steer axles. They recommend using industry guidelines not to fit to steer axles but its only a recommendation.

They feel that due to current testing standards a remould should be good for 10 years from remanufacture same as a first use tyre.

At least that how I read it...

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