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Bottom right photo:, in Cuba people are still transported like that, the locals refer to it as being a coca cola crate.

The original is the beer crate then )

 

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Todays bargain !!.  These Leyland mobile workshops look a good buy. There is no mention of the  Ham (Kingston) works in the advertisement , more on this another day .   Richard Peskett

I thought with the general international situation that a few things from my collection / library will be of general interest to all and make light reading which  I will for the time being gradually a

The steam wagon and traction engine  also played a significant part in the war effort. The war office  purchased 5 Thornycroft wagons in 1902  but for  many  years hence there was a big divide  betwee

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Mention was made that not many  class  'B' Liberty lorries found their way back here which  I agree with  but  I have found an advt. claiming  to be offering 600 of them !. This advert seems to be offering a good  strong truck  for reasonable money  but by this time (1923) I think supply had well outstripped demand.

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Richard Peskett.

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Plenty on offer here  !., One would assume that this depot would have been included in the deal  HM Govt. did with Slough , may be  it was sold on  by them in its entirety. 

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Richard Peskett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Another FWD advertisement , it  is often overlooked  the wide variety of uses these were put to worldwide after WW1 being  rebuilt for  use on railways,  civil engineering , timber trade etc. etc . and very popular with showmen in the travelling amusement trade . The  'Globe of Death' motor cycle stunt show was traveled by Arnold Bros. in the south of England.

Also of note is that a FWD owned by Tommy Redburn as entry no. B3  along with Jack Sparshatt's  Hallford as entry no.B31 were  the first lorries  in WW1  guise appearing  in the  first HCVC London to Brighton commercial vehicle run 1962.

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Richard Peskett.

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On 4/27/2020 at 5:28 PM, Richard Peskett said:

Plenty on offer here  !., One would assume that this depot would have been included in the deal  HM Govt. did with Slough , may be  it was sold on  by them in its entirety. 

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Richard Peskett.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some 'artistic licence' with the advert I think. Much along the lines of '1 careful owner, guv'.

Rouen was not the spares depot for the whole of the British Army. Calais was equally as big, if not bigger and then there was also the Middle East and the Home Front Depots.

I've not see any reference to Slough Trading selling the entire depot as one lot either and I'd guess that by October 1922 (although the depot must have been sold well before then) that Slough Trading had taken anything worth having for themselves and maybe sold the rest as a one lot as they were very skint by then. 

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A small error crept in to the last FWD  posting . It was actually the 1963 London to Brighton commercial run when  two  WW1   restored  lorries put in an appearance being  the Redburn FWD and  the Wolseley of Best Brothers. The Sparshatt  Hallford  was  probably the first  WW1 lorry in private ownership restored to WW1 specification to make a public appearance  being at the 'Old Commercial Vehicle Rally' , Beaulieu  July 1957.

A report on a peacetime convoy in the US  1923 included 75 Class B Liberty and 25  FWD referred to as  'Flirt with Death' by the marines . ummm.....

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The Sparshatt Hallford at Beaulieu ,July  1957, it had been recently found locked away at a glove factory at Havant, Hampshire  where it had been last used in  1922.  ( sorry about the quality  ).

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The  reconditioned Leyland .

The phrase  ' RAF type Leyland'  became a household name in the then infant haulage business throughout this country and in fact the world.  Few  today know that the whole episode virtually brought financial ruin to the company , mainly brought about by the company paying far too much  for the St. Omer dump and the financial saga rolled on into the 1920s. For more reading on this can be found in the Leyland Society  excellent magazine 'Leyland Torque' issue no. 85 Autumn 2019.

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Richard Peskett.

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A rather belated reply to a 25 April posting about the Crossley Kegresse.

Roger Bone who restored the Crossley BGV 6-wheeler acquired the remains of a Crossley 15-20 Kegresse which he found in France where the Kegresse bogie was being used to restore a Citroen but it did provide Roger with the correct gearbox and a few other bits. He had originally used the transmission from a 14hp Crossley car but that would not stand up to the loads on it and failed.

The restored Crossley 6-wheeler seems to have gone into hiding.

Malcolm Asquith

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Whilst on the subject of 'RAF type ' Leylands  both Commercial Motor  and Motor Transport carried superb  art drawn colour advertisement covers  on their special issues. This RAF type found its way to the Middle East by the look of it .

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Richard Peskett.

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The London General Omnibus Co. 'B' type  - straight from the 'Western Front' ,well not quite . Faced with the disposal of over 2500 vehicles  from 1919 onwards these being replaced by the larger 'K' and 'S' types.  Some of the newest examples were offered for sale first as complete vehicles in good order , at least 32  found there way to Australia some even with their double deck bus bodies still fitted . Gradually sales dwindled and by  the end most were broken up for scrap. A few survived a couple more years as works transport  during 1927-29 when AEC moved  from Walthamstow  to Southall.

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Richard Peskett.

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On 5/4/2020 at 4:58 AM, Richard Peskett said:

Whilst on the subject of 'RAF type ' Leylands  both Commercial Motor  and Motor Transport carried superb  art drawn colour advertisement covers  on their special issues. This RAF type found its way to the Middle East by the look of it .

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Richard Peskett.

Delightful art work. Five years after the end of The Great War, but a shorter time frame for Middle East conflicts. To me this illustrates the influence of the British occupation, with lorries of the time still in use. The driver  judging by his clothing appears to be a local, so again indicating a further acceptance of the transport.

 From this however comes more questions. At the end of hostilities were lorries  sold off in Egypt to local companies or to British firms operating contracts for the army, and other industries.

 A suitable title for the artwork. " The supply line continues using Leyland Lorries"

 Doug

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The steam wagon and traction engine  also played a significant part in the war effort. The war office  purchased 5 Thornycroft wagons in 1902  but for  many  years hence there was a big divide  between  the advocates of horse  or mechanical  transport. The Foden wagon  found many uses including that  of  the steam drum disinfector  for delousing clothing etc. etc . The front mounted railway style buffers was another feature which were no doubt put to good use on many occasions.

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Richard Peskett.

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