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British AFV Camouflage, 1939-45
Version 2.6 August 2001:  AMENDED 30th APRIL 2019 by Michael Starmer.

Mike Starmer and Mike Cooper

 

1944-45 – The final change in colour came in April 1944 when A.C.I. 533 authorised S.C.C.15 Olive Drab for use as the new basic colour, to remove the need to repaint U.S. supplied vehicles.  S.C.C.15 Olive Drab was used to replace the old S.C.C.2 in M.T.P.46 patterns or on its own particularly after the abandonment of pattern painting with ACI 1100 of August 1944 except on vehicles still in S.C.C.2.  S.C.C.15 Olive Drab was the first colour in this standard range to be formally named.  It does not match U.S. Army Olive Drab No.9.

https://www.mafva.org/british-vehicle-camouflage-1939-45/

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“ it was a momentous moment “ The crowds had come from miles...well my neighbour Simon had popped over. The moment had come to reunite the lower cab with the chassis!! You could feel th

“ when you start one of those jobs and half way through you say WHY!! “ Due to the general poor weather I decided to tackle a small in door job, the battery tray from the passenger side had suffe

It’s thin metal welding time!!  again🤨   Had  a few small repairs to carry out before the panels get painted  Bottom end of an engine bay panel, obviously a weak point as it’s been repaire

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It’s a 1944 truck and my thoughts were to go with a factory finish which would appear to be the SCC15 olive drab for this year but I am open to suggestions, although not keen on the Mickey Mouse camouflage pattern. 

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S.C.C. 15 would only be if its built after April-ish, as they most like would have used up existing stock of S.C.C. 2 firstly.  Here is a link to manual for painting of mechanical transport, https://www.paradata.org.uk/media/993 showing variation in the patterns and a link to https://www.mafva.org/british-vehicle-camouflage-1939-45/ a good source for the history of colour use 

 

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In reply to the query about the spare wheel, believe it goes under the rear of the body on a machinery bodied truck, will double check on my one tomorrow, I’m sure I can remember seeing a carrier under there!!

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Thanks Tom, there’s no mounting point anywhere to be seen on mine, could you please send some pictures when you get a chance, looks like I now need to find a spare wheel. 

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25 minutes ago, 67burwood said:

Thanks Tom, there’s no mounting point anywhere to be seen on mine, could you please send some pictures when you get a chance, looks like I now need to find a spare wheel. 

On the WOT6 Machy truck that I restored, I cannot recollect any mountings within the body for a spare. As the built the workshop body longer than a cargo, there is no space behind the cab. There could have been a rack under the rear of the chassis like the QL troop carrier had. Some of these workshop bodies were later fitted to Bedford QL and they also had the body up behind the cab. 

Here is a photo of a WOT6 Machinery truck in postwar service.

regards, Richard

Fordson WOT6 machy.jpg

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Thanks Richard, I’ve looked at as many old photos and models that I could find and couldn’t see any spare wheel mount, perhaps they were only supplied with inner tubes and the tools to do a kerb side repair. 

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Had a busy day today making the front body mounts for the cab, the original mounts were virtually non existent and what was left was a patch work of previous repairs, in an ideal world and if money was no object I would have had a whole new cab fabricated but unfortunately my lotto numbers didn’t come up and like many of us at the moment I have a bit of time on my hands!!

 

So....what do you do if you only have basic tools and no press ?

get out the big hammers of course..

first job was to make new the new mounting plates, straight forward enough, cut from 2mm steel so should last another 76 years and extra drain holes cut in to prolong there life, I think the lack of drainage properly killed the originals.

 

second job was to form a recess for the rubber mounts to sit in, not straight forward!! Ideally a press and blow torch would have done the trick but lacking in both items I only had a grinder, hammers, large socket and welder, picture are below showing the progress, there not the prettiest but there definitely strong and once fitted they won’t be seen.

let me know what you think and any other ideas for fabricating the recess as both the rear mounts also need doing. 
 

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Making do with what you have and still getting a result is half the fun of doing it. They will certainly do the job, and as you say they wont be seen.

If you want to have a go with a press for the rear mounts, (when the world gets back to normal) I have access to a 50t job at work in Sevenoaks. We could have a play on it one weekend

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Another day welding and grinding !!
I reckon in six months or so I might get the hang of this welding malarkey🤔

 

Finally got the front body mounts all lined up and in position, measure twice and weld once and if you bugger that up just cut it off and start again...

Body mounts welded in and inner wheel arch repaired, it’s a very fine line between cutting everything off and replacing it as it’s fairly knackered or repairing what’s already there, my personal opinion is if you replace everything then what’s original...but god I wish there were some repair panels available😬

 

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Whilst your welds aren't the prettiest (neither are mine) the heat affected zone tells you there is good penetration so it's going to hold together.

Keep at it you will only get better and faster.

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Slowly but surely......

Didn't get a chance to do much this week, play was interrupted by work!!
just as I was getting used to semi retirement. 

 

Borrowed a new toy just to try something different 

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Never used one before and had mixed results, most probably down to operator malfunction 🤔

unlike the mig which will blast through a small amount of surface rust the spot welder needs 100% clean contact, some welds where fine and others had a reassuring ping!! as the weld let go, definitely more practice needed.

 

finished repairing one internal panel and started on a second.

 

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Posted (edited)

The electrodes on the spot welder could do with a clean up, they should have a big shamfer and a small flat spot in the middle.

If you need one side of the weld to be undimpled make a flat topped cup to drop over the electrode.

Keep the pictures coming!

 

spot weld.bmp

Edited by rog8811
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Good advise.

I made a flat topped cup out of a bit of scrap brass about an inch in diameter and 3/4 inch long with a hole a bit bigger than the electrode drilled into the back 2/3 of the way through and a piece of copper soldered onto the working face. The copper will totally prevent the weld sticking and does not deteriorate at all other than needing cleaning occasionally. I probably do more with this than without.

It is surprising how many different shape and length electrodes become necessary too but they are quite expensive for what they are.

Keep up the good work,

David

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Finally!!! Drivers side welding complete 🎉🎉

So.....passenger side 🤔 worst than the drivers....

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😭😭😭😭😭😭😭

ok, so there’s a lot to do, crying finished, time to press on and stop staring at it.

Started small with the top section of the rear panel, having already done the drivers side I decided to change the method of fabricating and welding, I’ve taken advice from forum members who have commented on this blog and given me some good ideas, I’ve also borrowed a new tool!!

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Never used a joggler before but what a handy tool, also copied Robs idea of using my empty gas bottle for bending the sheet steel, I had previously used a scaffold tube in the vice but the bottle is a smoother roll

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Old steel cut out and edges cleaned 

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new panel joggled and holes punched for spot welding 

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fitted , clamped, welded and gone over with the grinder

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had mixed results with the spot welds on the top rail, the angle iron is thicker than the sheet and didn’t penetrate well before the hole filled with weld, any advice would be welcome.

 

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Day 43 of the rebuild🤨

Starting to make steady progress on the passenger side

step 1, cut off the large rusty bit

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step 2, stare at it for a considerable time 

step 3, repeat step 2 

step 4, drink tea and convince yourself you have a plan!!

step 5, finally do some work 

Cut out a rusted section of panel next to the door shut

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repair panel formed

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New panel fitted for welding, it’s been joggled , nibbled , fettled and whittled but now it fits.

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clamped and welded in.

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I was starting to get board with lots of welding and lots of grinding, I needed a new approach so I turned that classic movie The Karate kid for inspiration!!

I’ve now adopted the Mr Miyagi technique

“ weld on , grind off “ ,  “ weld on , grind off  “ ............it’s been a long day, what can I say, it amused me 😬

 

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