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Evening everyone    Well....the time had come to see if everything fitted 🤔 and..........it did!! , well almost......sort of.....kind of.....a few alterations later and a certain amount

“ it was a momentous moment “ The crowds had come from miles...well my neighbour Simon had popped over. The moment had come to reunite the lower cab with the chassis!! You could feel th

It’s been a busy few days, I’ve used every scrap of spare time in a big push to finish the back panel 🎉😬 22 separate pieces of sheet steel folded, joggled, curved and welded in....I must need my

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Quiet please, Teacher in class 👨‍🎓 Sit up at the back there, and I'll try to explain.

This is one of the harder welds to do successfully.  Might look simple, just fill the corner, but even experienced professional welders have to give it some thought to get a good finish.

It's all to do with the magnetic field created by the welding arc.  This is what draws the filler material (MIG wire or stick) into the joint as you weld.  If you are doing a straight butt weld the magnetic effect is equal on both sides of the joint, and you can get a straight weld with nice coins that not only looks good but has even penetration, creating a good solid weld.

When welding inside a 90 degree corner the two sides tend to act like a pair of magnets.  If you remember from your school science lessons, like poles on magnets repel.  Hold the like poles of two magnets together and they will push each other apart.  Same goes for the weld pool. 

Each side of the weld will try and push the arc to the other side.  It feels like you are not in control of the welding. Try as you might, but the weld pool just wont go where you want it. Chances are, as well,  you'll be holding the torch in an awkward position to be able to see what you are doing, and this doesn't help, either.

So, what can you do about it?  Couple of solutions which go some way to removing the problem.  First off the earth connection.   Get it as close to the joint as possible.  Get yourself a second earth lead (same size as the first one) so you can earth both sides of the joint, this lessens the magnetic effect.

Alternatively, and this works better when welding thinner metal.  Before bringing the two sides together, run a small bead of weld just shy of the inside edge of each piece.  This way once in position the two beads will lesson the 90 degree effect making it more like 45 degrees, and you weld the gap between the two.

Either or both of these tricks should get you a fairly straight, weld with decent penetration just where you want it.  If it still looks crap when you've finished you can always tidy it up with the grinder and a smear of filler! 😁

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There are several points to consider. One is wire thickness, you may need to use a thinner one when doing work on these thin panel. Also the type of gas you are using, I use an Argon mix and it gives you a flatter weld. Balance of wire speed and amps is essential also gas pressure settings.. Regarding the fillet welds, I find that weave welding works well, I learnt this with gas welding 50 years ago. Then we were only taught gas and arc welding, I learnt MIG by trial and error much later, but I always remember what a welder once told me, if someone is welding with MIG it should sound like sizzling bacon and that is very true, best to do a test on some scrap if you have changed settings.

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Thanks Richard, a bit more practice on scrap metal required. 
 

Richard, can you remember when you restored a wot6 how the windscreen frame was attached to the roof section? None of the internal metal work is original on mine and it looks like the screen frame was patched in situ, ie I have no idea how it should go together and I will have to build as I see fit. 

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3 minutes ago, 67burwood said:

Thanks Richard, a bit more practice on scrap metal required. 
 

Richard, can you remember when you restored a wot6 how the windscreen frame was attached to the roof section? None of the internal metal work is original on mine and it looks like the screen frame was patched in situ, ie I have no idea how it should go together and I will have to build as I see fit. 

I have been following your thread and luckily the one we were involved with was not as bad as yours, but there was problems with the roof at the front I think, but another chap took the roof away to repair, I worked on the lower cab and mechanicals. I have a feeling the top of the window assembly was welded to the cab roof. Will search out my photos to see if there are any clues.

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Made good progress today, finished both top corners and started work on the main panel. 
 

Started like this🤨

37BDFE7A-2CF7-413C-B70A-2B9DC3A681AA.thumb.jpeg.b3f21696b42fd5b92aeaa2a1f0a73130.jpeg

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And ended like this 😬

 

Finished the drivers top corner.

 

72944F59-D60F-416C-88C8-DB8E5C6C687B.thumb.jpeg.7dedd3eae9608b444bdbcd12d3dc2a7a.jpeg

 

Then set about making repair panels

 

864B3E86-1BFA-4A5D-9F48-D20E3B9F13B2.thumb.jpeg.6b6f951d1d5b4ac2bea37fe47bab9260.jpeg

 

The extra clamps worked a treat, cheers Rob.

Next up was stripping the outer skin to bare metal so I could see just how much needed to be replaced, using the woven pad preparation wheels from screwfix again, they just blast through paint and surface rust. 
 

468A0EA5-A1FE-4F4F-8EA3-65DE3D5CE748.thumb.jpeg.ab52946d3f4498ef7591bf3287f1d004.jpeg56B6A264-B1D6-41BD-AECA-A1873A3FDB9D.thumb.jpeg.829335d4721dd4b1f995ac81eb645234.jpeg

 

Plenty of old filler as expected.

Managed to get 3 sections replaced and 1 more cut out ready for next weekend.

 

D0A7FF8B-69D7-4ECF-835A-45882B5DBE00.thumb.jpeg.ab6c7f01093c917796232ea9ed8a5bd1.jpeg

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275E1CB2-10D4-48F9-8673-88355FFBF111.thumb.jpeg.784d0265734ecd22dc9fcd5a914aca37.jpeg

 

All welded and ground back.

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24F34AA6-BD06-421B-B8CB-68B6C61B1941.thumb.jpeg.70f172bd353837c7cbd4a511fb2830e1.jpeg

Extra large tub of filler required.

Last section cut out before the self imposed 5pm curfew ( got to keep the neighbours happy )

 

AE739FFD-2E59-4FC6-91E7-BC8E383518F1.thumb.jpeg.721fc7db42c6d5b9baf64af15959fc77.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It is all coming on well.

I have been looking for photos of the WOT6 I worked on as just found two photos that may show details for you. The picture showing the whole vehicle, if you zoom up to the top of the windscreen I can recollect a canvas strip inserted between roof and screen,it is basically a flap to stop water getting to the windscreen top hinges. The others shows the cab interior. The others are saved on a hard drive or memory stick so will see what can be found.

regards, Richard

In cab - Ford WOT6.jpg

WOT6 completed 002.jpg

WOT6 last 003.jpg

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2 hours ago, Richard Farrant said:

The picture showing the whole vehicle, if you zoom up to the top of the windscreen I can recollect a canvas strip inserted between roof and screen,it is basically a flap to stop water getting to the windscreen top hinges.

Thanks for the pictures Richard, mine has had a rubber strip fitted in the same place and it also looks like the screen frame is part of the roof. 

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Today’s activity.........welding, grinding.......welding, grinding......this sounds very familiar 🤔

 

First job was removing the last of the rusty repair patches which of course was covering more rust!!

75B8F8A8-5CE3-40E0-BB92-2389D20BCE14.thumb.jpeg.7f37b5c6c2ae1979a254ab3bc7a7f611.jpeg

And more rust

FADC22B5-DA12-4676-9DF9-574FE4A5A8C8.thumb.jpeg.ed3eacfbc193fd88b436fde93572b5ed.jpeg

followed by filler

3734E040-9D22-4DF6-9D8B-CEEA24968425.thumb.jpeg.e615816d3f24190d78a1ac210caa9955.jpeg

lots of filler

35BB18C7-898D-4343-BE1A-5673F6049ADE.thumb.jpeg.72a52af15e69687080495ad7f393ffa3.jpeg

 

Cut out the rusty sections of panel and fabric new.

 

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A715E758-782F-4755-8274-D6BA9868BAFB.thumb.jpeg.dfa59acc9b977d3c73873d2e63100228.jpeg

 

And then repeat again........and again..........🤨

 

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Small section in the centre as just a huge lump of filler

 

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Last repair panel today, everything is now welded in place, next weekend I will join the dots on the welding and grind it smooth.

 

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only one more section of panel to replace but that’s a job for next weekend.

 

 

 

Edited by 67burwood
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2 hours ago, earlymb said:

I think I see a small patch of old metal you missed, just left of the center? :)))

Great job and I check this topic every day for your progress!

 

To be fair there’s not a lot of the original panel left😂

it would have been so much easier to replace the whole rear panel but I would have lost the original pressings either side. 
 

Unfortunately the day job gets in the way of a daily update so weekends only at the moment, roll on summer!!

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Had a bit of a result over the last couple of days, finished work early yesterday and rained off this morning so managed to finish off the welding 🎉

 

DED6500D-C567-477D-8216-ECC2CCA4DF64.thumb.jpeg.9429ca4f374062274d00a1d95563b449.jpeg

Last section cut out.

 

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New section cut.

 

B87BDEB7-E818-45AE-8D28-55B11819D5D2.thumb.jpeg.0892ead34ab206e9045e533ae8f21516.jpeg

All welded in and joined the dots.

76701557-2FE4-4A7A-9732-2B83EAEE2590.thumb.jpeg.6cf58c9cb51a15da84c3535097573593.jpeg
 

Then finally a marathon session of grinding, thank goodness for flap discs.

 

83F2A771-0C31-4D98-BDD3-089F97F62676.thumb.jpeg.7cf1d5291c4da08846128e07d75381f0.jpeg

 

Next job filler, lots of filler!! 

Edited by 67burwood
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It’s been a busy few days, I’ve used every scrap of spare time in a big push to finish the back panel 🎉😬

22 separate pieces of sheet steel folded, joggled, curved and welded in....I must need my head seen too.....

 

73F93742-0681-417E-87F7-B40DB468261D.thumb.jpeg.43f1ebd52af549c7d52a89f4388ddff8.jpeg
 

Managed to get the first coat of filler on last night and sprayed with bonda. This is the third time it was filled and sanded, it’s not perfect but I can live with it.

8AC39C6F-530E-4F27-8152-679A5C8E0AA3.thumb.jpeg.9e331fe54ab5a87bf16b5492839c166e.jpeg

Last bit of  sanding was done by hand and was quicker than the sander.


F56627B1-27C9-47F9-A172-9664F8C8F3ED.thumb.jpeg.36d106c7c28abebe24078892647ccf1e.jpeg

 

Had a dry run fitting the panel before paint, we’ve all heard the saying 

“ fits like a glove “  it didn’t 🤨

despite my best efforts to keep everything square and in line it just didn’t happen with that many repairs, so out came the grinder , some minor fettling, a bigger hammer , a bit more welding, grinding and filling....

 

FCEA3628-A62A-40B7-9469-78092E565307.thumb.jpeg.3d420402eb50d27a11ce2d25ef589833.jpeg

E4FC6B7D-BD43-4672-A2D2-F2BBAA84F48B.thumb.jpeg.c9ff9eb06906451884c9fc3f7c3f1ae2.jpeg

 

Another coat of bonda and it’s done!!!

 

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