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On 5/12/2020 at 3:52 AM, Scrunt & Farthing said:

Ah Andy, now there is a nice switch.  It looks like it is the same as fitted in this picture:

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If you zoom into the dashboard you can see the switch is in some kind of frame or mount... and oddly telling the same time!

Per your question, yes that would be very useful and as Zero-Five-Two has rightly mentioned I do not want to push my luck... or perhaps I have.

 

 

The shape of that scuttle suggests the chassis is for a charabanc body.

 Doug

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It being a Tuesday evening, it was clearly time for Monday Club!  Monday club has many rules and purposes, some confoundingly complex. Firstly it is generally held on any evening except a Monday (sic)

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That is some very rare finds, I can imagine I would be pleased as punch finding all that!

I do like the use of the mag base drill, I have never used one before and seeing it in that situation is a good tip for the future.

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The mag drills really come into their own when using core drills enabling larger holes to be drilled. However I don't think the cheaper Chinese ones coming onto the market have a magnet as strong as Scrunt's.

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Mag drills are available used on eBay for reasonable money. Reasonable enough that I have one. 

Though I do feel that the format of the Rotabroach Adder looks like it might be better in tight spots like old vehicle chassis. (I see some new ones for £450 on eBay today, which is a lot cheaper than normal, but still not cheap) 

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10 minutes ago, Scrunt & Farthing said:

I think my willing assistant is wondering which of the wheelie bins the chassis would be best placed in.  He is clearly not a bus (or lorry) enthusiast .

 

 

Looks like your assistant would sooner be down the pub 😉

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  • 4 weeks later...

Growing up I concluded that my mother was not a classic bus enthusiast.  Why else would she have got so upset when she overhead my father commenting that he thought the woman down the road had a lovely pair of Bristols.  The eponymously named rear-engined  bus was a delight to handle.  And so it seemed, was the woman at number 42 which I assume is why my father run off with her.    

But enough of romance, these circumstances must have etched in my impressionable young mind that owning one of something is not enough.  Two is the ideal number.  And thus I find myself now the owner of a second Leyland SQ2.  If one impractically large and slow  rusted-behemoth is good, surly two is betterer.  

This SQ2 is interesting in that is has been modified to incorporate a third axle, with an interesting walking beam configured as a chain wrapped around a free turning sprocket.  the arrangement is ingenious, well executed and very heavy.  The lorry was owned for many years by Pentus H Brown of Leighton Buzzard, then to John Keeley in 1987 and the sale in 2016 where t made £600.  By a stroke of good fortune I saw it on ebay an d won it for a maiden bid of £1000.  I hope it yields parts such as clutch stop, transmission brake ,  road springs and steering column controls among much else.  Sadly still no fabrc drive discs or shafts, these have been robbed at some point.
The plan is to get it back home and start stripping it for parts, but for now the list of parts needed has gone down and that must always be a good thing.

 

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Never seen that type of compensator used on a tandem rear, the usual way was a simple rocking beam between the springs.  It looks like the chassis brace was extended to catch the springs if the chain failed.  Either way was not a great success as linking the rear of one spring to the front of another forms a reactive system that transfers weight from one axle to the other under acceleration and braking.

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The subject of what to do with it has been a hotly debated topic at the Leyland Scrap Bus and Lorry works (Kent Branch).  It was bought purely as a donor vehicle... initially,  in fact it seems to have donated some parts already., but as time has passed  the rarity value has not been lost on me. 

The dilemma is one of space, time and money.  The chassis (out of shot in the photos) is pretty mangled, but salvageable.  My desire is for a 1920s lorry on solids.  I have enough solids for four wheels; arranged in the conventional fashion.  Plus my chassis is in great order.   I could rob this chassis of what I need, which is transmission brake, two springs, controls and see what the engine looks like in terms of  crank and camshaft and then sell on the rest as a project.   I think the problem with that is that there are not many buyers out there for scrap 1920s lorries.  Alternatively I could restore the lorries as a pair, but this is not affordable.   Finally, I could put all of my unused parts into store and wait until an opportunity presents itself.

It is, as my friend Archbishop Hopper describes, a conundrum of the most perplexing nature.  I shall place my faith in Shepherd and Neame's Conundrum solving fluid (4.5% ABV) and hope a solution presents itself.

Edited by Scrunt & Farthing
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  • 1 month later...

It being a Tuesday evening, it was clearly time for Monday Club!  Monday club has many rules and purposes, some confoundingly complex. Firstly it is generally held on any evening except a Monday (sic). Thirdly some work has to be accomplished to achieve the second  objective, of enhancing shareholder value of Britains' finest brewers.  Hurrah for brewers.  

This weeks task was to finish making the rear axle more manoeuvrable by constructing a trolley,  remove the remaining spring and take off the propeller shaft tube.  We also decided to weigh the spring and axle for sporting purposes.   If you have ever moved a Leyland rear axle you will appreciate it has the manoeuvrability of a small continent. 

First off is the spring, which is a bugger of a job.  I don't like springs, they can bite.  So I have taken to fitting spring clamps to secure them.  The one tonight took a fair bit of shifting and robbed us of valuable brewer-shareholder-value enhancement-time.  Tsk.

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 As we were removing the prop tube it seemed sensible to drain the oil.  I don't think I have seen oil so thick, it was  like crude oil.  My Monday Club companion is shown making a viscosity comparison to his builders tea.  Like any good builder (or scientist) he insists the tea bag is left in the cup, but even under these exacting circumstances the axle oil won the viscosity test.  

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Our trolley will be used to store the axle and push it into a dark corner of the storage shed until its day comes.  Some stout castors and a bit of case-making and we were good to go.    

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Normally the Scrunt and Farthing scrap Lorry and Bus Works looks less tidy than this, but we tidied it especially for the photos.  The chair is available on ebay.   

Last job of the evening is the removal of the propeller shaft tube.  I was very pleased to see what good order the bevel gears are in.  The job  of removing the prop tube was simple enough.

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And now the exciting bit. The spring weighed 106kg and the axle 816kg.  I had guessed 760 and so was declared the winner.    DSC04967.thumb.JPG.8724a0f8f647cc5ba22d657611ba7c88.JPG

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With the nights drawing in, and Storm Barbara on its way we decided to repair to a place of safety.   As the winner of the "guess the axle weight competition" my prize was a case of Double Diamond Pale Ale  (2.8% ABV) whilst my friend had to make do with a Top Deck Shandy, such is the price of failure in Monday Club.  

Edited by Scrunt & Farthing
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  • 1 month later...

I see a month has passed since I posted last, but we have not been idle at the Scrap Bus and Lorry Works.  The second SQ2 (the ex-Keeley sale Leyland that had landed up ebay with a tractor dealer), has been pushed into place ready to be stripped of its useful parts.   This one was a bugger to move on account of most of the wheels refusing to revolve in the customary fashion.  By the time we had got it around the corner with the telehandler, it was just starting to play ball but we have left a nice rubber trail in the road.  

I include an additional little pic of the rear-end damage to the chassis.  I have no idea how, why and when this happened but it makes a useful place to hang ones hat.  And like any gentlemen, I always remove my hat when stripping.

 

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Some of the little items of treasure this lorry has yielded include these lovely little Rotherham Greasers and the hand throttle/ignition controls quadrant.  A lovely item in Bronze.  It has taken a whack so will need to be straightened.  I shall do this gently and check my metallurgy before we go mad, as Bronze and Brass can easily crack under a bit of stress.  I do need a steering wheel 20" diameter; 7/8 hole.  I have not got the patience or skill to do as Tomo did, so if anyone has a four spoker of a suitable size and they want to swap for beer tokens (should there be any pubs that survive  post-Covid) please write to the usual address.

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The first step was to strip out the steering column,  and change speed/hand brake lever quadrant.    Leyland seemed to love a control rod.  I think I counted 10 that needed to come out.  Most were rusted solid, and despite our soaking them in Diesel on our last Monday Club (sic last Wednesday), everyone needed heating with the oxy-propane to get them to shift.  I gave up on one and just burnt through the rod with the gas.  The rods will all be replaced with new material but I wanted to preserve the length of each one prior to making new.

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Stripping continues, I am hoping to get the engine out shortly.   This is not in great condition but will yield some small articles such as covers, stop clutch.

But before that, we need to make some more shelving for storing all of the parts.  Now, where is my hat?    

 

 

Edited by Scrunt & Farthing
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1 hour ago, Rootes75 said:

That really does look a good source of spares. Even the smallest items are invaluable to a restoration project.

How did the tractor dealer come about it?

As best I can work out, the lorry was knocked down to scrap dealer (Sam the Scrap) at the Keeley Sale for £600.  At the time it had a very (very) large tank on the chassis.  I think the scrap man must have removed the tank as it then passed to a tractor dealer in Great Missenden as part of a deal.  In many ways the absence of the tank helped me as it would have been too large to dispose of, and too risky to cut up with gas not knowing it's former contents.

The lorry sustained a bit of damage along the way (bronze taps missing; fan assembly snapped off) etc.   Ross the tractor dealer (a very decent dealer who was honest and helpful) advertised it on ebay at £1000 and I got it for that.    We had to get it out of there pretty sharpish as Ross did not wanting it hanging around so it has been held, very kindly on the farm belonging to the chap who does my haulage.  We then brought it home a week ago.   I am still short of a few bits, but it does move the project forward in lots of useful ways.

 

 

 

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