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Another J Type on the way !


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37 minutes ago, Tomo.T said:

Hi Steve, I'm sure the crankcase mouths are bigger on mine, I will check on Monday. Also there is a small ammount of possible upwards movement which would shut off the combustion chamber. I take your point about low temp, low performance, but I'm concerned about pistons picking up etc.

Hi Tomo,

A possible solution if you are uncertain about pegging the liner, is making a thin steel plate to fit between cylinder and crankcase, probably stainless as it will have a greater strength, this would lower the compression ratio slightly of course. The inside diameter of the plate being just a smidge larger than the crankcase throat and large enough to keep the liner from moving. All said and done it depends on the fit of the liner as I have fitted many plain liners to engines with interference fit and never had or known one to slip.

regards, Richard

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Some progress has occured in the diff casing department. After a thorough clean up with celulose thinners, two coats of 'Glyptal' insulating paint were applied to the inner surfaces.  The r

Nearly done, bar a few finishing touches, it only remains to light the wicks for a grand finale. But first, I need to find some paraffin.

The steering wheel has come on leaps and bounds today. The arrival of the rolled tube coincided with Stan being rained off and I prepped all the parts and made two spiggots from a short boiler tube of

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Ah, yes, we had a flange put on the liners so they couldn't go up.

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If you are in any doubt, peg them. It is very easy to do on this engine as you have access to the outside of the cylinder wall below the water jacket. Drill through, tap it, screw the peg in until the end of the thread and dress off inside and out.

Steve.  :)

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21 minutes ago, Old Bill said:

Ah, yes, we had a flange put on the liners so they couldn't go up.

And I imagine that the OD of the flange also stops them dropping down into the crankcase 

I am not sure how big a peg would need to be to cope with a piston picking-up. But if that happens you have other problems. 

If the liner dropped far enough for a piston ring to pop over the top, then that would be bad. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Well the cylinders are back in the queue for further engineering, while I summon up the courage to drill holes in the newly refurbished barrels.

There has been a further advance on the lamp front, when a familiar looking item popped up on e bay.

20200511_145201.thumb.jpg.fe183ca57c45fc4b7c261e69570f0e9e.jpg

This turned out to be the exact item we needed and well worth the asking price.

20200511_145654.thumb.jpg.407023387f9b6a7b2107d4dca0ac20c6.jpg

Once cleaned up and re-wicked it was fitted into one of the sidelamps to make a good pair. This released the old civilian tank (with brass trim) to rejoin it's old mates the bezel and badge in the new rear lamp.

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That will conclude the lamp saga !

The old box the lamps are sat on is a genuine 1917 'equipment' container and will provide the design for a lamp box.

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Another little project !

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am still in the queue for engineering and suffering a serious lack of funds, which obviously makes progress on anything requiring expenditure, somewhat difficult.

Fortunately a number of paying jobs have turned up, and I am fully occupied trying to drag myself out of the sh1t ! I'm sure I'm not alone in the present circumstances.

However, in every project there are jobs which lurk and get bypassed for various reasons and it didn't take me long to find some.

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A nice pair of suitable gate hinges have been hanging around long enough and have now been attached to the seat lid, which now opens, to reveal....

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A newly primed tool box ! Anyone who has painted one of these will understand why this particular job took a while to get round to.

While I had the primer out I found another cramped and awkward spot to paint, which had previously escaped my attention.

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And that was my Saturday. Time really does fly when you're  enjoying yourself. 🙂

Edited by Tomo.T
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I recently applied the finishing coat to Stan's Garrett's 2nd back wheel and with the resultant spare time, I had another go at the seat mounting brackets. Steve had very kindly supplied a sketch of an original, which showed up an error in my previous effort. They were re configured with slots for the cut down bolts to lie in, which is a much better and stronger idea and should have been spotted earlier tbh. !  🙄 

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With a bit of prep (both sides,) they were set up ready to go, hoping to attract the attention of a passing welder ! 

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Stan very kindly did the honours and with a small tidy up and a Bonda, the job's a 'good un' and the seat can finaly be fitted.

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On 5/24/2020 at 3:53 PM, Tomo.T said:

Well the cylinders are back in the queue for further engineering, while I summon up the courage to drill holes in the newly refurbished barrels.

There has been a further advance on the lamp front, when a familiar looking item popped up on e bay.

20200511_145201.thumb.jpg.fe183ca57c45fc4b7c261e69570f0e9e.jpg

This turned out to be the exact item we needed and well worth the asking price.

20200511_145654.thumb.jpg.407023387f9b6a7b2107d4dca0ac20c6.jpg

Once cleaned up and re-wicked it was fitted into one of the sidelamps to make a good pair. This released the old civilian tank (with brass trim) to rejoin it's old mates the bezel and badge in the new rear lamp.

20200511_142024.thumb.jpg.831752fbc2bb4621803d51df9613165c.jpg

20200511_142745.thumb.jpg.0f20e734330145f161ed2ad8bfb2ac7c.jpg

That will conclude the lamp saga !

The old box the lamps are sat on is a genuine 1917 'equipment' container and will provide the design for a lamp box.

20200511_144147.thumb.jpg.57ada57e8f34f953132dec6fd8ebd853.jpg

20200511_144736.thumb.jpg.ec2130e3ff2ae122e8e36de999ef788c.jpg

Another little project !

That box is a real nice piece of history in itself.

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Phew, wot a scorcher !

The valve springs were re examined and the longest of them sent to Tested Spring  for evaluation ,with a view to the manufacture of a new set. The valve spring caps were given a thorough beasting with the rotary whizzer and set aside to await their new partners.

Some considerable sweat was expended in the process, but I was able to maintain fluid levels with copious mugs of tea, and thus managed  also to tackle the cam follower clamps, after pausing to admire the delicate  castings. 

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The seat brackets were given a coat of Service Colour and the cam clamps were treated to some Bonda.

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And here they are looking much more cheerful ☺

Edited by Tomo.T
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The fixing of the seat was another black mark on the overdue task list, which I was keen to finish off. Armed with the necessary fixings I first marked and drilled the holes for the rear struts. This went well and all that remained was to drill through the holes in the struts to attach them to the rear of the seat. Unfortunately, the mighty Bosch was too long to fit in the gap and I had to abandon project until a smaller battery drill could be borrowed from Stan.

This setback gave me the opportunity to paint the interior with Service Colour, which was much easier with the seat on its back.

I returned next day armed with Stan's drill and a very useful clamp which immediately proved it's worth by holding the strut tight against the wood.

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It was then a simple matter of drilling the holes and applying coach bolts. Once tightened up all round, the seat was secured in the original manner. Whether this would meet modern standards is open to question.

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  • 3 weeks later...

My decision on the cylinder liner pins has been to leave well alone and allow the chemical assistance to do it's job. This has meant I can focus on the paintwork, which is where I'm on solid ground !

Next in line for engineering is No 4 little end who was found wanting on parade, with a sloppy gudgeon pin.

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Considerable wear was apparent on the pin.

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The reason for this was quickly spotted by Mike Lewenden.

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Ello, where's the oil hole then !?

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Ah ! There he is, awol on the side. Must have slipped round and shut off the oil. More glue required. Plus a new bush and a new pin. Mike has been tasked and is on the case.

The rest have passed muster and are fit for further service. 🙂

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That is one explanation, the other being that it was wrongly assembled when last overhauled.

I note the bronze bush is very wide. When we were faced with bushing down the connecting rods from an original gudgeon pin diameter of 1.300" to 0.875" in the engine of our International truck, we received advice that the bronze should be as thin as practicable due to its compressibility. This led us to double bush the conrod. This situation arose because we had to use the pistons from one engine and conrods from another, and for some strange reason, the gudgeon pins were 1.300" in one, and 0.866" (22mm!) in the other. We purchased new gudgeon pins of 0.875" diameter and reamed the pistons to suit.

It was interesting to find metric sizes in this 1918 vehicle made in USA. The OD of the Hyatt bearings in the rear wheel hubs were 100mm too, but the adjacent oil seal was 4" (101.6mm).

Ian

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18 hours ago, IAN_B said:

That is one explanation, the other being that it was wrongly assembled when last overhauled.

 

It was interesting to find metric sizes in this 1918 vehicle made in USA. The OD of the Hyatt bearings in the rear wheel hubs were 100mm too, but the adjacent oil seal was 4" (101.6mm).

Ian

Hi Ian, Yes that is also possible, if so, it was the only slip up we have found and I'm prepared to give 'W' the benefit of the doubt!

METRIC sizes do appear on Great War British lorries, notably in tyre and wheel sizes, which are always marked in mm.

Tomo

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A sudden surge by Stan has produced the Mk.1 engine stand, which is good and strong, but will need slight alteration in order to accommodate the crankcase upside down for crank fitting.

I only sat the blocks on top to draw round, for the gasket surfaces to be avoided when  painting the crankcase. However the  photographic opportunity was too good to miss !

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This was a considerable moral boost and has spurred me on to paint the crankcase.

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Little end update ;  A close examination of the other three connecting rods has revealed strange things. All four have the little end oil hole in the bush, set at 9 o clock ! This was a deliberate move. There is a  shallow channel cut into the external centre of the bush which feeds oil down to the lower hole. 

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I have no idea what the plan was,  but the set up apparently worked fine until the oil pump got a little tired and no. 4 began to be neglected at the end of the line. There was no scoring or signs of distress, just a little wear, which was quickly sorted by Mike, who re-made and fitted the bush and just got away with re cycling the old pin.

I should add Mike has already dealt with the oil pump in a previous thread, it's had its endfloat adjusted and is now raring to go.

 

 

 

 

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The cam followers have presented their own problem in the way of finish. They were usually made from bronze, but wartime expedience led to ferrous replacements, which is what we have. Painting them would have been a bit of a cop out and the condition was not too bad........ So, I invested two days hand polishing into the job and seven of them now look quite presentable. ( one is best viewed from a distance ! )

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I also got a first coat of Service Colour on the crankcase. A good productive weekend was had at the cost of two sore thumbs.

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I've seen these oil channels and turned holes in 30s Mercedes engines. Seems it's a common feature. There is an old trick to reuse slightly worn bushings - press them out, tinplate with babbitt alloy the outside, then press them back in place. In the process some of the babbitt is removed by  the conrod, but enough remains to tighten the bushing so much, that the pin would not fit in it. So, after reaming to size, it is as good as new. I guess new new is the best :), but material was scarce at some times, so such tricks were used. Have tried it myself and really works.

Edited by Ted170
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  • 2 weeks later...

Another coat was applied to the crank case and all was looking well.............

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Until I set in motion a series of events, by trying to clean out the threads of the oil filler pipe holes. I found an old 1/4 " Whit tap and was nearly done when I struck a burr or something at the end. The tap broke off flush, leaving a 1/2 inch of carbide steel stuck fast in the thread. What you might call a 'whoops' moment ! Three 'super hard' drills failed to make any impression and I was left with a days work chipping out the remains in tiny pieces. This was successfully accomplished, but not much original thread remained. I stepped up to 5/16 whit and drilled and tapped two new holes, which were fitted with a couple of engineering studs. Just about got away with that ! Twat.

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Moving on, we have some better progress to report on two other fronts. TI engineering  have produced a fine set of big end bolts. These were originally made in a (complete) bastard thread of Mr Thornycroft 's own design. We settled on 7/16 BSF as the closest standard size, which also meant we could use these little treasures from 1956.

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Also, after another final clean up from Stuart on the blaster.

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It is time to complete the cylinders, with the previously aquired G&S valves and newly arrived Tested Springs.

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Onward and upward.

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  • 2 weeks later...

 A dip into the jewelry box reminded me that the cylinder drain cocks required some attention.

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One has a wonky handle, the other is mismatched and has no handle at all. Not a great start. I have kept an eye out on e bay without success, but this time I got lucky and turned up a fairly good replacement. This came with the added attraction of being NOS and reasonably priced.20200820_115706.thumb.jpg.6fea8f93302272b3c3d16fb4126738df.jpg

It will pass muster at a distance and will doofa now.

The wonky handle will stay for a bit of character as I am persuaded that straightening it would be a bad idea.

Edited by Tomo.T
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