Jump to content

Dodge D15T


Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, Rootes75 said:

It does look a tricky piece of fabricating. Talking about clamp Pete, I have a good set of magnetic ones and they have been god sends in situations like this.

Agreed mag clamps are very useful, I use them in some situations to hold sheet and larger sections for fillet or butt welding but I notice they can make the arc unstable when working  close to them so I try to only use them when tacking. 

In this instance I used the screws as the angle is dead square while the floor section has some slight distortion,  both the angle and floor pressing are 16 gauge so it needs some force to draw the two together. 

Pete 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...
Posted (edited)

Time for a bit of a catch up on this project.  It's been a long cold wet winter here in the west so the decision between spending time in front of the wood burner or spending time in an unheated workshop has been a finely balanced one.

However some progress has been made on days when the thermometer rose above freezing so with out further ado (for this read lame wet willy excuses) here is the other half of the rear cab sheet repair that I had started in my last set of photos. 

The method is exactly the same as the first half of the rear sheet that was covered previously.   The only difference here is that the red spray can ran out so I found an old tin of white primer and used that instead to keep the flash rust at bay until media blasting is carried out. One unintentional advantage about using white is that it is much easier to see the pin hole misses in the butt welds and saves the effort of marking them up with chalk............ why didn't I think of that earlier??

Here is the underside of the cab floor with the replacement angle in place and the bottom sheet replacement strip folded round it and crimped over.

SDC19135.JPG.2ce7a94af3ac919ba8376c57a5cf9e49.JPG

 

This is the completed job the new lower edge is to the left of the photo

SDC19134.JPG.1715d00480ff33403b2fc63d34fb13e0.JPG

 Just the hole in the cab floor that was hacked out around the tank change tap to be welded up then this will be job and knock for the repair work on rear section of the cab .

Pete

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

With work on the sheet metal work progressing well I turned my attention to the big lumps of iron sitting in the corner of the workshop slowly seeping oil onto the floor and providing commodious if somewhat dirty accommodation for spiders and the odd mouse......after removing the accumulated junk that had found a useful resting place there as well the Dodge's engine and gear box appeared. Both units will be fully stripped inspected and parts replaced if out of spec.

Doing mechanical work on these big  units is relatively quick ( but potentially very expensive).  The thing that takes the time is cleaning, checking and repairing all the ancillary kit that hangs off the big lumps.  So now I always start with these ancillary items first and in this case it was the engine that I started with.

So here's a few before and afters with a bit of commentary as required.

First up air filter 

Before

SDC19058.JPG.2e2da983ad06f5ac5e173ccaa9d5e203.JPG

SDC19059.thumb.JPG.5f307f551f976b6734ae7d3679e42164.JPG

 

After

SDC19061.JPG.c4bdf977cea131bd0383836e1b878b5f.JPG

SDC19064.JPG.5eb1df72b9d8e57e95eed7e70cee0e5d.JPG

SDC19065.JPG.91f755257d3b4d10fdca13f8dc5e5cf0.JPG

One or two dings in the lid unfortunately that were not possible to remove as the filter housing is spot welded to the lid and this prevents access, but I can live with them.

Next up the Fan no big deal here just a week or so in the molasses bath a rinse and a quick wiz with the wire brush on the grinder jobs a good'n.

Before

 SDC19045.JPG.457ebc39da944773a28052b1f940655b.JPG  

 

After

SDC19063.JPG.9000b8a258b75abbde718dc229962bcf.JPG

More to follow

Pete

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

OK so now a bit more technical stuff here

The distributor this is a vacuum advance unit made by Auto-Lite for Chrysler Corporation Canada

Before

 SDC19009.JPG.d9077810a0bbcbd6dc1acdd63bdedb0e.JPG

 

During strip down

SDC19027.JPG.7d7bf4296d07e2e6488b70fa5654bce3.JPG

Centrifugal balance weight springs in good condition and with a drop of oil on the pivots everything looked good to go

SDC19026.JPG.dfd917582fe39486a637040aeda44e31.JPG

There is no ware on the tongue of the drive shaft and no movement in the shaft bushes so all good.

Everything now cleaned, oiled, new points, rotor and condenser fitted painted and reassembled, the vacuum chamber was also tested to make sure the diaphragm wasn't perished and a new low tension wire made up and fitted. The outer sleeve for this is the original one and is made of woven wire mesh (similar to the one on a jeep fender and fulfills the same function of suppression)

SDC19029.JPG.8ed23fb6ed3b099fbe25d5c16c416197.JPG

SDC19030.JPG.bcb9bf2535a305bb3466c3cd39e6dcda.JPG

Right there's a mug of tea in the offing and a chocolate biscuit or two so more to follow after that.

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s coming along nicely, these jobs are a labour of love, if you add up the hours spent cleaning and checking everything it’s not a good business model 😬

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This next one is all about oily bits.

First up is the Oil filler tube with integral cap and air filter

Before

filler.jpg.1d790d00f96a9552333a633a865a56b7.jpg

 

During clean up

SDC19031.JPG.77ffd3d0d758e526c664ac81236159af.JPG

After

SDC19043.thumb.JPG.be35265a302ea9e85369167cb7e9b4e6.JPG

The next item is the oil filter housing.  Dodge Chrysler Canada seemed to have employed three different types during the production run for these trucks 

this is the one that was on the engine when the truck came to me it is the first type, it's a sealed canister the whole thing has to be replaced during an oil change. Not a very clever idea on active service and almost impossible to find now.  I believe some British trucks notably Bedfords used a similar system. I have kept the unit as a curio but have replaced it with a later canister with replacement element type. 

1215105222_firstfilterhousing.jpg.ae018152c139da524ba7866c22038e07.jpg

The second type was a canister with a replaceable element the lid had a T bar on the securing nut and looked like this if anyone has one for sale in good condition I may be interested.

1977612224_mountingexample.jpg.8354d44dc0b13a1848ee5642f33d4367.jpg

 

the last type is the very recognizable canister and flat nut with replaceable element and this is the one I have currently obtained and intend to use.

.Before

SDC19062.thumb.JPG.960d97b09412100f4d7b8e935a173a73.JPG

 

After

I have yet to determine what type and how many of decals should be on the unit I'm fairly certain it's a Purlator design but slightly different from the standard Junior Military fitted to jeeps and WC 3/4 tons so  if anyone could supply photos of them and a source I'd love to hear from you.

SDC19066.JPG.610d0bc5586fe51123d4d442a8c1e75d.JPG

more to follow

Pete

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, 67burwood said:

It’s coming along nicely, these jobs are a labour of love, if you add up the hours spent cleaning and checking everything it’s not a good business model 😬

Thank you, your right there doing  the out of the ordinary stuff certainly isn't a way to run a business unless you are into the exotic stuff.   Knocking out a jeep every three months or so can be if your tooled up to do it but it gets boring, been there done it and the T shirt went into the rag box nearly 30 years ago now.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Now this next piece comes with some marital advice attached so be warned.

Carburetor what could possibly go wrong?

The unit is a Ball & Ball Carter model ETT-1 produced for Chrysler Canada  

Before

SDC19077.JPG.227c48f5a939654731ebdc03f5fefe38.JPG

SDC19079.JPG.4ac322d4c0f22c4282e0b57b1b9ac1ba.JPG

Here it is with the float chamber opened up

SDC19085.JPG.6cadbdda4529589317204e59ee34ac59.JPG

 

Float removed and a view of the pump and compensating jet fittings both of which were seized in their respective bores so some careful work required to remove them both and not damage anything in the process

SDC19091.JPG.8621e4eede69f5192a5f4ccd9d1b1e0a.JPG

 

Here's a page from the manual showing the full set up

SDC19095.thumb.JPG.6b6fae55abe4f8a9cf3adeb9febd6825.JPG

 

Now this next bit that carries the warning only do this next bit if you are 

A, Single 

B, Have a partner/wife/girlfriend/significant other or any other variation, well who am I to judge???  (delete as appropriate) that has lived with military vehicle restoration for at least 35 years 

I offer this advice as a public disclaimer in support of any legal action where I may be named in cases for divorce or separation settlements resulting from doing the following:

Here's all the bits disassembled with (and this bit is important) all brass and copper fittings removed sitting on the stove in a mixture of white vinegar and a snifter of Lemon juice gently simmering very gently for about 30 minutes.......don't say I didn't warn you. 

SDC19101.JPG.fc8055d6f2b7410a749a339e47d19302.JPG

Once it cools down rinse everything off with plenty of cold water and blow through all passageways this method cleans all the gum and tarnish off, a quick buff up of the outside and it looks like new.

Here all the bits are laid ready for reassembly the new kit came in from the US

SDC19102.JPG.18def1d77f58946916f836f503c87250.JPG

SDC19103.JPG.14bd8263630d76ee84d6dd40f135f1b9.JPG 

And here's the finished job with a bit of paint on the throttle body all ship shape in the sun

SDC19107.JPG.ddb7bc80bdfdac018d96022a1122a5f2.JPG

SDC19108.JPG.6bd510c0aad777f07440c7f992a64363.JPG

last bit to follow

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Last but not least the bit that starts everything going

Auto-Lite built for Chrysler Corp pre-engage 6V starter probably identical to the 1/2 ton and 3/4 ton US models.

Before

SDC19109.JPG.45beaf3fb438f15333c8cf60dc68475b.JPG

SDC19110.JPG.9afd6bd64c36df601a47fc5a997f1d8c.JPG

 

Here the end plate and nose have been removed, the case rotary wire brushed and a note added on the photo to self for reference to aid reassembly.  I still use a note book and pencil but it's so much faster with the camera and simple graphic package nowadays. 

SDC19113.JPG.191d29b0639e1e7c6f32f5955774104d.JPG

 

the commutator has been lightly sanded and the mica uncut the phosphor bronze bushes checked for ware and each end of the motor shaft measured, Bendix checked and lightly oiled and the drive teeth checked. There was no ware at all so after checking the field coils for shorts everything was laid out ready for painting and reassembly

SDC19116.JPG.abf6fd4503ef649ea261f569f51cfd5b.JPG

SDC19117.JPG.8af76a537c46a62cf99e5ce66572fbe0.JPG

The brushes were in very good condition so they were refitted with the end plate, the starter contacts were cleaned and checked for surface contact and then the whole thing looked like this

SDC19119.JPG.27beca7954aff487af3f9a75a4121e8b.JPG

That's all for now 

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Pete Ashby said:

Now this next piece comes with some marital advice attached so be warned.

Carburetor what could possibly go wrong?

Now this next bit that carries the warning only do this next bit if you are 

A, Single 

B, Have a partner/wife/girlfriend/significant other or any other variation, well who am I to judge???  (delete as appropriate) that has lived with military vehicle restoration for at least 35 years 

 

All looking every good....

at least you didn't use the dishwasher 🙂

Cheers Richard

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Rootes75 said:

Some lovely work here, looks really good with the transfers/stickers on the parts.

Thank you they are water slide transfers that came in from the US, when applying them I use a setting solution that the kit modelers use to make sure the transfer beds down without air bubbles or wrinkles.  Needless to say a good sound surface is required for the transfer to adhere to.

Edited by Pete Ashby
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, 64EK26 said:

All looking every good....

at least you didn't use the dishwasher 🙂

Cheers Richard

We don't have one any more Richard but when we did I've used that as well for small parts works like a charm.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Pete Ashby said:

Now this next bit that carries the warning only do this next bit if you are 

A, Single 

B, Have a partner/wife/girlfriend/significant other or any other variation, well who am I to judge???  (delete as appropriate) that has lived with military vehicle restoration for at least 35 years 

 

Haha....I  wanted to clean some engine stuff in the kitchen a while ago....and my girlfriend gave me a pan from the thrift store and suggested I'd use the camping gaz burner OUTSIDE!

 

Lovely work, Pete. The parts look so much better after a good clean, service and a new paint layer. Well done.

Alex

 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, Alex van de Wetering said:

 

Haha....I  wanted to clean some engine stuff in the kitchen a while ago....and my girlfriend gave me a pan from the thrift store and suggested I'd use the camping gaz burner OUTSIDE!

 

Lovely work, Pete. The parts look so much better after a good clean, service and a new paint layer. Well done.

Alex

 

Thanks Alex,

the camping stove option is a good one and in terms of harmonious relationships the best choice  but there is a certain thrill in living dangerously.  

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Posted (edited)

Time for a update on progress  from the Wild West.  

Continuing the previous theme of focusing effort on the mechanical bits I dragged the gearbox out of storage.  Then  set about cleaning and de-greasing the outside before starting to take anything apart and risk getting the internals contaminated with the tens of years of accumulated muck and grit.

 CMP  Canadian Dodge series trucks all shared the same basic 4 speed Warner T-9 gear box the D15 tanker has a PTO output for driving the power pump similar to the D60  tipper version.

So this was the starting point

SDC18417.JPG.4764e348b573b94798d8f230c5a2f4bc.JPG

 

You can see the power pump PTO on the right hand side of the gearbox  in the photo below with the engagement lever on the front of the case

SDC19120.JPG.cc3541f68b432468de962564fb843b88.JPG

 

Here the worst of the gunge has been cleaned off the case,  Then the hand brake band,drum and output flange have been removed along with the complete PTO unit.

SDC19145.JPG.8246cc4bb23221b7e06abc32b97e432a.JPG

 

More to follow

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

With all the external bits of kit removed it was time for the moment of truth as the shift tower and top cover was removed enabling the first proper inspection of the gear sets to be made.

Result!!  no chipped or damaged teeth and all the case hardening was in perfect unmarked condition, due to a large extent to low mileage and the very gloopy gearbox oil.   This could have been original military spec oil,  have you ever noticed how original transmission oil  it has a very distinctive smell?, it brings back happy memories from the scrap yards of my youth searching out elusive MV parts.....................  Any way moving on.

Here the input shaft has been removed 

SDC19147.JPG.0260139bdf934d6104fb6111cbb986c7.JPG

 

Now the lay shaft has been driven out to drop the lay shaft  gear cluster into the bottom of the case so that the out put shaft and gear sets can be taken out of top of the box.  With a bit of a fiddle the lay shaft gears can be lifted up out of the box.  The Warner T 9 box has no thrust washers on the lay shaft and relies on the hardened face of the lay shaft gear front and back running on a machined faces in the box casting. Reverse idler and shift fork can be seen at the lower front of the case.

SDC19150.JPG.b0f2dbf66c01617ca3321722d60f09ff.JPG

 

more to follow

Pete

 

 

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

The Warner T 9  uses roller cage bearings one for the main shaft pilot bearing and two large ones for the Lay shaft gear cluster so the next step was  check these out for condition and ware. Reverse idler is a bush and that checked out fine as well.

Here's a couple of photos from the manual showing the T 9 it's a very simple box to work on and is virtualy bullet proof in operation

SDC19170.JPG.65a0cb6affc992b3273efd7ab5b44e42.JPG

SDC19171.JPG.a645aecfaf16e907071d0c9fc00368eb.JPG

 

This is how Dodge Brothers recommend you test a cage bearing for ware any torsional movement indicates ware in the carrier frames and needles.

SDC19172.JPG.cdd467b5e960ea1424583933ef248dff.JPG

Then it was a case of getting the micrometer and vernier out to measure the lay shaft and pilot shafts and the bores on the gears against the factory spec. 

Everything checked out within a couple of thou with the exception of the main shaft pilot roller cage which showed considerable ware.  This seemed very odd when the rest of the box was virtually factory new.  I suspect it has something to do with the PTO operation running the gearbox in neutral for considerable periods of time while filling the the tank.  A  new bearing was sourced and everything was put into clean polythene bags while the case was prepared for painting

After a go with the wire brush on the grinder and and a wash down with 2k universal thinner

SDC19151.JPG.e73f66329abafd05e3955f8fc9c118fa.JPG

SDC19152.JPG.aac3c93a08c3c356db22e9f7759e5c5a.JPG

 

Coat of etch primer applied

SDC19153.JPG.ff19279b27ace58b914a246e1057f3e2.JPG

SDC19154.JPG.5a341335c519a269a1010362b6290316.JPG

 

Two coats of G3 top coat

SDC19156.JPG.39d825648e0793ffe9aadcc7bc829431.JPG

SDC19157.JPG.03075c4e0a346683d1953d808e7fab13.JPG

 

shift tower and top plate in etch primer after checking for bent shift forks and operation in all positions 

SDC19158.JPG.507d3f61f2b9554f1def35b45928f2a4.JPG

 

In two coats of G3

SDC19160.JPG.37c5db7a2f45c3012081ce9e652a360f.JPG

 

so that was that,  everything was put aside for the paint to harden off fully before the rebuild started.

more to follow

Pete

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Once the paint was hard it was time to stuff all the bit's back inside the case the input and output main carrier bearings were like new so they went back in with the new pilot roller cage, new leather rear output seal and new gaskets all round.

I was recently asked where I got my gaskets from,  the person asking me had never heard of the answer before which I must say surprised me.  So for any one who is wondering I've set out below how I do it.

  I'm sure a lot of people know how to do this so don't bother with the next couple of photos skim through to the finished job photos at the bottom of the page.   

 But for anyone who hasn't made a gasket here's how I was taught to do it below.

I make them the old fashioned way with the exception perhaps of one or two specialist engine gaskets like exhaust and head for example I have made exhaust gaskets before but it's a mega pain in the butt and takes a long time if you can get them buy them would be my advice.

First off you need gasket paper ( although back in the day any old corn flake packet would do at a push).

Gasket paper comes in various thicknesses in long rolls, ( google it it's not expensive compared to buying preformed gaskets).  It's important to have a range of of thicknesses in stock.  Here for example in the case of the T 9 the pre- load on the input and out bearing races is determined by the number and thickness of gaskets required.

These are the gaskets I made for this job

SDC19163.JPG.1b434ac86de206fab77d2cde82fcf982.JPG

 

This is how they are made:

First up cut a chunk of gasket paper big enough to cover the whole mating surface

Take a small ball pein hammer and hold the sheet of gasket paper on the job making sure it covers all of the mating surface 

Find the first bolt hole by rubbing your thumb around where it should be it helps if your thumbs a bit grubby

Once you have the marked the first hole hold everything square on the mating surface and gently tap round the mark made by your thumb using the ball end of the hammer, a few taps and the paper cleanly falls away (remember to pick it out of the bolt holes when the job is complete)

This bit is important, put a bolt in the hole if it's a threaded hole put the original bolt back in a couple of turns if it's just a clearance hole find a bolt of similar diameter and drop it through the gasket paper this now is your datum point that will help to hold everything square

Choose a bolt hole on the opposite side of the work piece and repeat the above procedure and put another bolt in

Do this for all the other holes working from one side to other in turn adding a bolt each time

When all the holes have been tapped through rub your thumb round the inside edge of the mating flange and gently tap that out the center portion 

It looks like this now and I've started to tap out the outer edge of the gasket.  Notice the angle of the hammer it needs to be at about 45 degrees to the edge of the flange to cut through cleanly

SDC19161.JPG.f76e4094fde81d197ed6d77279243de0.JPG

 

Jobs done one PTO gasket 

SDC19162.JPG.cfec51333e0e3efae4eb15d53aaec3ee.JPG

 

Right now for any one who's gone to make a cup of tea and grab a biscuit while all that was going on here's the finished Warner T 9 it just needs the hand brake drum, operating cams and band fitting.

I have a new old stock lining that I'll have to drill and center bore to take the rivet head then I'll  rivet the lining onto the band but that's for another day.

SDC19164.JPG.e5b33b21e00597b8ad49d304e4ce3090.JPG

 

SDC19165.JPG.4aec0b19c73a6d41e902134ea730557a.JPG

 

SDC19166.JPG.b24a3d23c6d5af2f5760836e38bddd0a.JPG

 

That's all for for now

Pete

 

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Pete

Looking good, did you have much trouble finding a new bearing or are they still made?

I use a leather hide  hammer and a scalpel to cut round the edges, this ensures that no damage is done to the castings, a ball pein hammer may chip the edge of a casting.

Cheers

Richard

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, 64EK26 said:

Hi Pete

Looking good, did you have much trouble finding a new bearing or are they still made?

I use a leather hide  hammer and a scalpel to cut round the edges, this ensures that no damage is done to the castings, a ball pein hammer may chip the edge of a casting.

Cheers

Richard

Thanks Richard, no no problem getting the bearing I use the Vintage Bearing Company they're on the web for bearings and seals reasonable prices and quick delivery. There was no part number on the roller cage or else I could have probably sourced it through 'bearings are us' also on the web.  Bearings and seals are universal and almost never made for individual applications the trick is being able to cross reference the part number to a modern produced item.

Your right about the hide hammer vs the ball pein if I were doing this on an Al casting then a soft faced hammer would be preferable I've got a plastic one from B&Q that does the job admirably, but there is little danger when dealing with big chunks of cast like this, as ever the trick is in the wrist.

regards

Pete

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Cushman 53 said:

Loving this build, looks very nice indeed Pete, soon be on the road!

Thank you pleased your enjoying the blog. I try to make them a bit chatty and on occasion pass on the odd nugget of information picked up along the road of collecting and restoring MV's for just a little short of 50 years now,  I'm not  professionally trained but every one learns from their mistakes I was once told  (I'm fairly certain they lied as if that was the case I'd be the worlds authority by now).

As for getting the truck on the road there's a bit more to do yet but every job is another bite at the Elephant, although I have to say that some of the projects waiting their turn are beginning to look more like Woolly Mammoths ! 

Pete

Edited by Pete Ashby
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

To open this new chapter of the project I'll open with a quote from that Mega icon of  Welsh culture  Nessa, ...... " Oh what's occurring",  (for foreign followers and English non viewers of Gavin and Stacey PM me and I'll send you a explanatory cultural and linguistic link). 

Any way to business, last time I updated this blog I was messing about with engine sub assemblies and the gearbox so the logical step would be to investigate the large greasy lump that was taking up too  much room at the back of the workshop right?,  wrong,  I spent the summer working on the Retriever (see the blog updates elsewhere on HMVF).

but that  greasy thing lurking in the shadows of the workshop, .......no, not Nessa, steady that man !!........ kept attracting my attention so a month or so ago it's time had come.

Fortuitously my son was down for the weekend, cunning eh? so we manhandled it out to a point where the gantry crane could get at it.  It was at this point that we discovered I had forgotten to drain the sump.   Oh how we laughed as a huge pool of thick black oil and residual antifreeze spread all over the nice clean workshop floor.

Some time later after much swearing draining the sump and cleaning up the mess it looked like this

SDC18473.JPG.0afb0547ba6366973840e6f4fbc0e80e.JPG

 

With a bit of maneuvering (posh word for buggering about) I got the gantry with the engine hanging off it out of the bottom workshop  and the engine loaded onto my pickup for a short trip across the yard to the other shop.

Here it is on the back of the pickup where the autopsy will be performed ready to be lifted off,  those little pallets are just right for carting engines and gearboxes around.

SDC19208.JPG.86472fa844c2ede60150b9080fe94922.JPG

More to follow

Pete

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...