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Spray foam found on green goddess


Rubberduck
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If you look at the rear of the vehicle, below and to the right of the main water inlet, there is a foam concentrate inlet socket.

About an inch bore. In your CES there should be a pipe that fits onto this socket (about six foot long) this pipe sucks the concentrate into the pump and mixes it with water on its way out.

I will try to find a photo of ours pumping foam at Rochdale Fire Service Museum.

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I've got an odd looking pipe that could be for such a job. I couldn't make my mind up if they would or not. With the massive advantages of foam use I thought they would of found a way to use it if needed. I'll have a look tomorrow and see if the pipe fits.

 

Thank you.

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Hi folks.

 

Was spray foam used in these appliances? In one of the side lockers I've got about 100 ltrs of methanol resistant foam concentrate and an odd lance.

 

Is that methanol resistant or alcohol resistant. The foam containers should have a label stating what type of foam it is, and it sounds as though it could be AR-AFFF (Alcohol Resistant Aqueous Film Forming Foams)as used by the RAF years ago for example for containing fuel fires. It is synthetic and therefore not bio-degradable and illegal to use now days so I would recommend disposing of it -- responsibly -- do not pour it down a drain, it needs to go to a specialist disposal point for burning.

It is most likely the foam was loaded on the appliance during the Firefighters strike of 1977 as the green goddesses were drawn from Home Office Stores and operated by the Military, Army, RAF and Navy and certainly down here in Somerset they were equipped by the Fire Service with foam branches and the more common foam of the day AFFF, also illegal now.

Foam has a 5 year life and should be disposed of especially if it's been sat about in a container because it degrades and will cause all sorts of problems with the pump if used, so don't be tempted to run it through the pump, the cost of parts is

prohibitive.

If it was left on the appliance it is quite likely it was already out of date and the user didn't want it back because of the cost of disposing of it. Just about everybody's Fire Brigade tried to get rid of its bulk foam at Bunsfield when the refinery went up a few years ago, they had more foam than they knew what to with, and most Brigades got theirs back.

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We used AFFF on the ship, managed to find this image of the set up for AFFF, II seem to recall on the fire ground it was diluted with OX blood.

The branch was fitted at the hydrant to save lugging the barrels around. The foam making fitting also had an adaptor to connect to the pipe which went to the barrel which was never used on ship

 

image81.gif

 

The picture was off the net, never had pictures of the set up on site as when on the ground was renewing sea fire fighting ticket, full BA as well

 

MIL-E-24759-20.png

 

Never was sure following training who would connect foam at the discharge point

Edited by Surveyor
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The Green Goddess as at is nick named was never a military fire engine!

 

Although not necessarily green there was 2085.0171 Truck, Fire Fighting, 3 Ton, 4x4, Bedford RL (original code 334237.61.360) & a fire fighting water tanker to match 2090.1171

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Although not necessarily green there was 2085.0171 Truck, Fire Fighting, 3 Ton, 4x4, Bedford RL (original code 334237.61.360) & a fire fighting water tanker to match 2090.1171

 

Contract 6/V/23019

Code 2085.0171

18 CE 55 - 18 CE 94

1958

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As the GG , Auxiliary Fire Service and UK military fire services are my pet subjects of interest I can help here. The GG was conceived (early 1950s)as part of the re-equipment programme for self contained mobile fire columns for the Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS) for use after a nuclear attack or other major disaster; The pump on the GG was by Sigmund and when built the pump was the best in the world, it was equipped with connections to enable a foam induction/proportion unit to be couple with the inlet of the pump so finished foam could be delivered through the 4 outlets. The necessary foam compound, branch pipes and inductors were carried on AFS 3 ton Bedford GP trucks ( and later some Commer) adapted to the role of Foam Tender. At the time there was also another method of producing foam on fire enginesas shown in the upper picture in the illustrations in post 9 of this thread. hose was run from a delivery and connected to a foam making branch pipe, a suction tube ran from this branch pipe into a 5 gal drum of foam. This latter method was not part of the normal method of operation for the AFS or part of its normal equipment.

However after the 4x4 GG came into service with the AFS the Army Fire Service was looking for a tender to replace their ageing Bedford QL tenders, as result orders for a modified version of the GG were placed. changes included an extra locker behind the rear nearside wheel arch, it had exactly the same pump. It carried a lot more items than the AFS GG as it had to deal with the wide range of incidents that happened on or near all the various Army units across the globe; this included extra ladders and 2 medium size foam making branch pipes which were carried on the roof. plus drums of foam carried in a locker. These Army lookalikes were initially delivered in both gloss Deep Bronze Green and Lt Stone, but later repainted signal red.

RETURNING to the original AFS GGs when we drew then from the Home Office Stores for the 77/78 strike most were given additional equipment in addition to the original AFS inventory. this included a small foam making branch pipe complete with suction tube and 2 or 4 5gal drums of foam compound. I was a crew commander on this strike. In 2002 when we again drew the GGs from store and I was still in the service at this time, the GGs were again equipped with the foam branch pipe and drums of foam. When the Army's own fleet of GG lookalikes were sold thru the auctions in the late 1970s early 1980s they were normally sold with out CES; However when the AFS / Home Office fleet was auctioned through Withams in 2005 the vast majority were sold completely equipped inc foam drums.

hope this is helpful

TED

Edited by ted angus
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THe AFS was one of a number of voluntary "Civil Defence" organisations set up by the civil defence act of 1948 set up in response to Soviet aggression. Had we gone to war the AFS along with the local authority brigades would have formed a reconstituted National Fire Service. (NFS)- reconstituted because we previously had an NFS from 1941 until 1948.

 

maybe we need to get another afs formed now !!??

 

TED

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