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WW1 Peerless lorry restoration


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Can't leave Dad to have all the fun! Now that the front wheels are on along with the track rod, king pins and stub axles, the king pins need some greasers. We are fortunate to have the remains of

A Genie! Gosh that made me laugh. Nothing quite so exciting really. Here is a picture of the store room.

Guy, a forum member put me on to a recent auction in case there was anything there that caught my eye. Something most certainly did, four Peerless front wheels. I put in an on line bid and was delight

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  • 2 weeks later...

We have, as you might expect, been busy over the weekend and we will share that shortly. In the mean time, I have been doing some preparatory work to make up a second spring clamp plate as we have only one. Unfortunately, it is a bit of an oddity as it traps the overload spring on the top. Dad started the job by cutting out a base plate.

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I then welded some bits of angle to hold the spring. Unusually, for me, the weld came out quite well. An expert would be critical but by my standards it was OK!

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Some time with angle grinder and files and the result was quite acceptable.

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The second spring will be a challenge. It is 7/16" wire with some really weird ends.

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I have found a spring maker here in Leicester who will take a look at the job but I can't visit for the time being!

We have also taken delivery of some new U-bolts from Jones Springs who were extremely helpful.

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They fit too!

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More later. Watch this space!

Steve   :)

Edited by Old Bill
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I didn't think so.  I'm sure you'll find something for them to do.  I asked because I have seen very similar nuts where the top bit has been slit and crimped to have the same high friction anti-loosening effect.

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Time to fit the front axle! We lifted it into position and balanced it on a stool while we fitted the U-bolts.

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The other end was trickier of courseas the holes did not line up but with a little help from a bottle jack to push the springs apart, they went in. We fitted them with ordinary plain 5/8" UNF nuts, just nipped up for the time being until we can fit the overload springs.

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New balls were fitted to the king-pin thrust races.

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I fed the king pin through whilst Tim held the stub axle.

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The king pin screws into the lower part of the axle and a lock nut is fitted.

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On the top are two holes for a locking washer.

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Father had previously rescued and cleaned up some lock washers.

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Wheels next! I fitted the inner race after greasing it up and then screwed in the locking ring. This has a grub screw in the joint to stop it unscrewing.

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The two of us can just lift a front wheel so we put that on the stub whilst father fitted the other race.

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The securing nut and some shim washers to set the end float and the wheel was on!

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Dad had already cleaned and painted a hub cap spo that was fitted.

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Coming on now!

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Track rod next with Father's brand new pins.

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After that was fitted, I checked the tracking and found that the wheels toe-in by 2". That is the rims at the front of the wheel at a radius of 15" are 2" closer together than the rims at the back. I think that this is too much and that a better figure would be around the 1/2" mark. What do you think?

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We took the track rod off again to see if it could be adjusted.

Now onto the back axle. The U-bolts at the rear are OK but access to the nuts is very difficult. I managed to find a deep 29mm impact socket which would do the job except that it was still too big in diameter to fit without fouling the axle. I put it up in the lathe and, running it slowly with a tipped tool, managed to turn 1/8" off the diameter which was just enough.

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Back axle now secured to the limit of my strength with a 3/4" drive socket wrench!

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The back axle is mounted on swinging links at both ends and is secured by an adjustable radius rod which allows the chain tension to be adjusted. This rod has bronze bushes at both ends which locate on bosses on the end of the axle and on a casting on the side of the chassis.

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Dad had cleaned and painted two adjusters but unfortunately, one of them was very worn to the point that there was 1/4" clearance.

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We had a rummage in stores and found another which fitted much better so we decided to use that instead. First job was to strip it down and clean it. Getting the lock-nut off took two big spanners, heat and some serious effort. All OK in the end, however.

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To fit the radius rod assembly, the axle needs to be in the right place. It took a ratchett strap to move it though!

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It dropped on nicely in the end. The locking washer will be secured once the chain tension has been set.

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The brake back plate was fitted too. This was a performance again because it is on studs which are 3/8" UNS thread. We found enough nuts to clean up and fit it but are rapidly running out of these fasteners. I really don't want to start making up nuts if I can avoid it. Does anyone know where we could buy some UNS nuts in a handful of sizes please?

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That was it in Devon for the weekend. We will have another get-together to do the other side in a couple of weeks.

Steve  :)

 

Edited by Old Bill
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Well, I am back in Leicestershire again and, having managed to dodge the bank holiday traffic, had a couple of hours this afternoon to take a look at the track rod.

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It was a bit of a puzzle to work out how it went together. There is a screw thread inside which must provide the adjustment but how does that nut work?

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A closer look revealed a slot cut in the clevis. I decided that rather than being a simple lock-nut, the nut must have a tapered bore which squeezes the clevis onto the thread. Only thing to do was to try to take it apart.

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Clamp it to the bench and get the blow lamp out.

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A bit of heave-ho with a big spanner got it moving but I could not release the lock nut. I therefore unscrewed them both together but, as you can see, this did the thread no good.

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Some serious hammer blows broke the joint between the clevis and lock nut and the taper was revealed.

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A wire brush soon tidied them up and they can be primed again.

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My problem now is the thread. The engagement is very long so I am happy that sufficient strength will remain in the joint. However, the threads do need cleaning up. They are 1 3/16" x 12tpi which is an odd size again so now I am on a hunt for a suitable tap and die to borrow or buy. I don't want to start making those as well!

Steve   :)

Edited by Old Bill
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36 minutes ago, Old Bill said:

However, the threads do need cleaning up. They are 1 3/16" x 12tpi which is an odd size again so now I am on a hunt for a suitable tap and die to borrow or buy. I don't want to start making those as well!

If you can get access to a lathe which has a big enough through-bore then I would suggest hand-chasing the thread. 

(improvise a woodturning-style rest and let the chasing tool feed itself along. It actually goes a lot better than you might expect) 

There are some on eBay at the moment, one is £5 BIN, but this one claims to be "USS": https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/122563590343

 

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Toe in should be 1/8 to 1/4 positive or “toe in”, castor can be adjusted by shims......about one half degree positive would be ideal. It was probably 2.5 when new, but today’s roads will allow for less. Project is coming along nicely. 

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17 hours ago, Old Bill said:

Well, I am back in Leicestershire again and, having managed to dodge the bank holiday traffic, had a couple of hours this afternoon to take a look at the track rod.

DSCN9301.JPG.8e6295851b2da4f890773262ef588468.JPG

It was a bit of a puzzle to work out how it went together. There is a screw thread inside which must provide the adjustment but how does that nut work?

DSCN9302.JPG.155c20c504946b6bad21457fd2727621.JPG

A closer look revealed a slot cut in the clevis. I decided that rather than being a simple lock-nut, the nut must have a tapered bore which squeezes the clevis onto the thread. Only thing to do was to try to take it apart.

DSCN9303.JPG.4f95b58f4b58fa05b1deb3c70bcb449b.JPG

Clamp it to the bench and get the blow lamp out.

DSCN9307.JPG.c8e7f85b859bd1bdd42b3fd7f2d9ca58.JPG

A bit of heave-ho with a big spanner got it moving but I could not release the lock nut. I therefore unscrewed them both together but, as you can see, this did the thread no good.

DSCN9308.JPG.13570d12f3258aca0f25c66006b84fff.JPG

DSCN9310.JPG.1698f971c0ffd691829dccaa45df7754.JPG

Some serious hammer blows broke the joint between the clevis and lock nut and the taper was revealed.

DSCN9313.JPG.6972de5c4437f0ec5694fd6ba2db9a23.JPG

A wire brush soon tidied them up and they can be primed again.

DSCN9316.JPG.26dc6098374aa78bf8913308db1cc0ec.JPG

My problem now is the thread. The engagement is very long so I am happy that sufficient strength will remain in the joint. However, the threads do need cleaning up. They are 1 3/16" x 12tpi which is an odd size again so now I am on a hunt for a suitable tap and die to borrow or buy. I don't want to start making those as well!

Steve   :)

I have a 12tpi internal thread chaser and various others you could borrow if you you have no luck else were.

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Another option would be a Coventry Die Head. I know where there is one (South Kensington) but it's all covidded shut. And is likely to be too small. 

Though that does suggest another option. I know that you discounted making a die, but it might not be so hard to improvise a die using: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/391436755923

Maybe just a guide hole with a single die-head cutter running in a slot advanced by a bolt? Wood would probably work, or 3D-print. 

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Thanks Bernard and Andy for your kind offer and suggestions. I think Father has tracked a tap and die down so, with a bit of luck, we will be sorted shortly. Just have to pay the bill! It is amazing what you can find when you start looking. 3/8" UNS nuts still elude us, however. We may have to resort to making the things. Oh well.

 

Steve  :)

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18 hours ago, edinmass said:

Toe in should be 1/8 to 1/4 positive or “toe in”, castor can be adjusted by shims......about one half degree positive would be ideal. It was probably 2.5 when new, but today’s roads will allow for less. Project is coming along nicely. 

Thanks Ed. Nice to hear from you again! Yes, I did think that 2" toe-in would be a bit excessive. It is always nice to have the voice of experience so we can get it right first time.

Steve  :)

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