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WW1 Peerless lorry restoration


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Dad machined the Bronze Bush today - left a fairly slack fit for the Shackle Pin as the internal diameter of the Bush will decrease when it is squeezed into the Spring. Started by jacking it in into the Spring - our usual method but it tightened up considerably when it was about half way in. Had to resort to the Press and that finished the job easily.

 

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Can't leave Dad to have all the fun! Now that the front wheels are on along with the track rod, king pins and stub axles, the king pins need some greasers. We are fortunate to have the remains of

Guy, a forum member put me on to a recent auction in case there was anything there that caught my eye. Something most certainly did, four Peerless front wheels. I put in an on line bid and was delight

A Genie! Gosh that made me laugh. Nothing quite so exciting really. Here is a picture of the store room.

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Now eyeing up the next job - we have two King Pins that will want tidying up but will be fit to be used again but only one nut for them so the second nut will have to be made. They are 2" A/F and the thread is either 1.42" x16 or maybe 1.40" x16 - depends which one you measure. We have 2" Hex steel in stock so that should be a straight forward job.

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Looking now at the Track rod or described in the Parts Book as the Steering Cross Rod. We have recovered a sound one from our "spares Department" but no Clevis Bolts. The Bolts incorporate Greasers. We have another old front axle with these parts still on it but the Clevis Bolts look beyond use again - so at least one has to come out to be used as a pattern for us to make two new ones. One has started to move but needs some more work yet. 

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dad spent the day trying to free the stubborn Clevis Bolt. After spreading the end trying to get it out he eventually had to grind off the end to get it free. All the information still there to make copies.

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I was just musing on what screw threads Peerless were using at that time, I would have assumed NF for those shackle pins.   The SAE were trying to standardise threads by the middle of the great war (to a US standard) and Peerless had already adopted many of the (non thread) SAE standards so i am guessing by the time this lorry was built it was all NC/NF.  Or is that a foolish assumption?

Dave (S&F)

Edited by Scrunt & Farthing
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We were lead into a sense of false security about threads when we started the Peerless - by that time we had already done three American trucks - two 1917 Autocars and the 1918 FWD -the threads in the Autocars were all UNC and the FWD was all UNF - so we naturally thought that the Peerless would be one of those two thread systems - in which case we would probably have all the required Taps and Dies for any thread that we would have to make for Peerless. Wrong! We could not identify any of the threads initially that we began to reveal on the Peerless and it was really through this Forum and helpful advice from others that the light dawned that they were UNS.

Another  thing - it seems very likely that our Peerless could have gone through Slough Estates before it was sold on and in which case, the odd British thread appears.

Tony

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That is interesting, thanks Tony.  I guess the bigger diameter threads were UNS where they wanted to reduce the pitch (in spite of the diameter) to reduce the depth of the nut whilst keeping the load area high.  It looks like that is what they done on the clevis pins.

I always think it interesting to discover things like this, and re-think what must have been discussed in the drawing office, back in the day. 

Chees, Dave (S&F)

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Prepared the bits to make the two new Clevis Pins and also threaded a length of 2" A/F hex bar to make two new King Pin Nuts. The King Pin Nuts will be made back to back - easier to hold that way and will then be separated when all machining completed

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Thanks for posting.

It sure keeps us Quarantined people entertained.

Not that your prior resto's didn't.

I thoroughly enjoy and applaud your efforts.

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We have been watching this post with a great deal of interest, and I have been updating dad with it as far as possible with the isolation rules applied, out of interest if you can get the Smithsonian channel, America in colour, the episode with Ford, firestone and Edison has a great deal on ww1 and the car and truck industry and a convoy of ww1 cross the country, they are often repeated so may be worth a view

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I 'm really pleased that you are enjoying it all. This lock down is a real pain although Dad is definitely making the most of it! I think the target will be to hang the front end as soon as we are all allowed back together. To that end, Dad has everything under control except for the king pin thrust races which are with me. We have four bearings in stock from which we need two.

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They have a spherical top which sits in the top of the axle end.

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There are thirteen 5/8" diameter balls in each. Those that we have could do at a pinch but they are a bit ratty so I will order up some replacements.

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The main problem is that that either through use or corrosion, the races are dimpled. This will make the steering very lumpy as to rotate, the whole weight of the front end must lift.

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Not quite sure what to do about these. I have had a look on line to see if the bearings are still available but have not found anything like yet. They actually look like turned parts so I thought I would try tickling them up with a carbide tool. The results were predictable.....

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Does anyone have any suggestions as to what to do next? I could just leave them but it rather goes against the grain!

Steve      :confused:

Edited by Old Bill
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Build an assembly with a drive system, plonk it in something full of something like valve grinding paste and just let it turn for a few hours, basically lap them like valve seats.

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I have a small universal grinder with an attachement for internal grinding. With a stone dressed conical and with the right diameter it would make an easy job of it. I imagine that someone near you has the right equipment. I would gladly do it for you guys at no charge, if only I were closer.

Regards

Marcel (enjoying this thread very much!)

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It might be worth thinking about making some out of gauge plate and then hardening them ,or anneal the old ones then machine and reharden .them .I expect the original ones are carbon steel so well within your capabilities     Mike

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I reckon that my CNC lathe with a CBN tool could tickle them back in to shape it it was OK for them to become a little thinner.

(And I am not allowed in to work for 3 weeks,  and expect to run out of things to do)

Edited by andypugh
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1 minute ago, andypugh said:

I reckon that my CNC lathe with a CBN tool could tickle them back in to shape it it was OK for them to become a little thinner.

I seem to recall you have a ball-turning attachment. Could that be fitted with a CBN tool to generate the circular profile? 

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16 minutes ago, andypugh said:

I reckon that my CNC lathe with a CBN tool could tickle them back in to shape it it was OK for them to become a little thinner.

(And I am not allowed in to work for 3 weeks,  and expect to run out of things to do)

CBN would tickle them nicely.  What about 440c SS, and then run up to the proper temperature.   With 440c you will get to the proper hardness for the bearing.  The only problem might be finding a small enough quantity.

Dave

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Thank you chaps for all fo your thoughts and comments regarding the thrust race, particularly Marcel for your very kind offer. A trip to Belgium has a lot of appeal at the moment! Your suggestion, Marcel, of the tool and cutter grinder gave me the idea of using my Dremel grinder in the toolpost, later confirmed by Hedd (Brass Cleaner), so this is what I tried this morning:

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The grinding disc has a larger radius than the groove so I set it below centre line on an angle. The groove shape seems to be uncritical as it certainly doesn't match the balls.

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With the lathe on bottom speed (25rpm) and a very ginger feed of no more than half a thou every ten revs or so, I had a go.

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The result was actually very pleasing.

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Before and after.

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I did two lower races and one upper one as we already have a good one.

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All very satisfying and some original parts salvaged which is always good news. I have ordered some new balls to go with them.

Than you everyone for all of your ideas!

Steve  :)

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