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It's here! (Bedford RL)


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Posted (edited)

After sloshing some more of that nice blue paint around, I loosely hung the thermostat housing & water pump on the engine, just to free up some shelf space. And since I was doing that, why not the fan and pulley, too?
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Moving on, time for more rust... yay. 😔

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It's like a bloody onion! I keep having to peel back layers, and everyone I cut out makes me cry even more.

Anyway, a bit of forward progress: 1280-IMG_20210527_205656.jpg

Completely managed to avoid taking a photograph of the bit I wanted to show, in the next picture. What I've done was cut out the rusted lower part of that upright, and weld in a piece of box-section; so now that's all tied to the new front cross-member too.

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Just got to keep tackling it a bit at a time.

Edited by Tamber
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Looks good.

I have the same philosophy, just keep tackling little bits at a time and before you realise it you look at your project and you can see things coming together.

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  • 1 month later...

Right! So! Anyone else dimly remember -- way back in the beginning of this thread -- I was scratching my head over the brake servo, and whether I had all the little bits for that strange little valve, and whatnot?

Well, I now have answers.

Contained within Bedford Truck & Coach brake service training manual (TS1087):
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Doesn't that look familiar?

And, furthermore:
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I very well may have actually had all the bits all along! ...Well, whether or not I still have all the bits, after moving the truck twice, changing jobs & moving toolboxes, etc... Well, that's a different matter entirely.

Other than this discovery, the welding continued up until I discovered I'd welded something in the wrong place and had to unpick it. To be honest, I was so annoyed that I just left it, and then the weather decided that I really needed to be on the surface of the sun, and that kinda took the wind out of me anyway. It's been unpicked, and is now waiting for me to stick it back on in the right place, but the car is higher on the priority list for welding work due to sills and a wheel-arch.

The engine dress-up continued...
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Then, I went hunting for the engine side cover (y'know, the one that covers the lifters & pushrods), and didn't find it. So I went and cleaned up the starter motor instead, because that was right there.
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As part of cleaning up, I pulled off the cover band and... ew
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That dirt looks... glittery. (Brush material)

Anyway, went to slowly unpick it a bit more to clean all that grot out and made a bit of an unwelcome discovery.
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That has had a bad day!
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Seeing as the Lucas M45G is so prevalent amongst old Brit vehicles -- the joys of everything being built out of the same parts bins! -- this isn't the end of the world. At some point I'll run the starter motor on up to Jeff's, where work has their starters & alternators serviced, and get that seen to.
While running through old scanned cross-reference manuals, it turns out that this exact same starter configuration was used in Aston Martins of a comparable vintage to the RL, which is neat.
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Current big roadblocks on the engine are getting the correct sump and oil pump pickup. I should probably make a post in classifieds and see if anyone has one, once I get a sufficiently circular tuit. 😁 If not, then if worst comes to worst, I can have a flange profiled out that matches the original sump, and fabricate the rest; but that slows things down a bit. Well, a bit more...

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Noticed you have a busted starter. I have this one on ebay currently off a Jaguar XJ6. You can have it for the cost of postage if it's any use to you for the internals. This thread has given a lot of happy reading over the years so it's a little payback if you can use it!

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Thanks for the offer, but as it's just a brush wire I think it should be fixable by the local starter shop; wouldn't like to kill a perfectly good starter for the sake of that! Hopefully it'll come in useful for someone else, though!

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  • 1 month later...

Would anyone happen to have some rough dimensions -- or at least clear photographs -- of the correct 4WD sump and (ideally, but optionally!) the oil pump pickup that would go with it?

I've been squinting at the 1955 (Amended 1958) manual and from the pictures given there, the oil pump appears the same as the one I have, except for the pickup tube. Now, I know I have a later engine, but the oil pump is in the same location on the engine; and the pickup I have is basically mounted directly on the bottom of the pump, whereas the diagrams given in the EMER show a much longer pickup and an oil-pan that appears to be much more square with the sump moved further forward and seemingly a good bit deeper. In summary, same volume, but with a smaller footprint.

A crude digital crayon sketch -- not to scale, of course -- illustrating this, is attached below:

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I think, as best as I can tell, that the difference in pickup is just vertical height -- which is a relatively simple change to make -- as opposed to any fore/aft displacement. In which case, I should only need a sump!

(Well, I could modify the one I have, but I'm already going to struggle to meet my self-imposed target of having the engine running by the end of the year as is! Not been in the greatest of shapes, mentally or physically, this year; and that's slowed things down.)

The engine is mostly assembled by this point, though, so I'm not a million miles off; and I've got a MUST/SHOULD/COULD set of lists going. :D

Anyway, I've also had to move all the wheels into the unit as they're no longer allowed to live outside (so sayeth the landlord) and now it's nearly impossible to move in there! So, seeing as I don't particularly want to use them, they have to go. ...the wheels, that is, not the landlord.

I did try breaking one down, mostly for the experience (we don't do split-ring wheels at work) but also in the hope that I'd be able to make them compact/light enough that I could stack them onto the truck more easily; but holy crap that's a colossal pain in the behind. I do have video of me struggling...
(I'd put them on par with doing a 17.5" tubeless tyre, with levers and sledgehammer. And the tyre seems to be stuck to the wheel rim with rust. I can probably free it off, but at this point, eh...)

So that's 7 9.00-20s, two of which are still mounted on the truck, and one is on the bed of the truck (so that'll be exciting getting it down.), and the one I started breaking down already had a crushed valve-stem so that tube is scrap anyway, but it was still holding air; and one 11.00-20 (which is also on the truck bed.)
Most of them are Duramold branded, one is a Pirelli (I think?), and the 11.00 is a Phoenix brand. They're all of unknown age, all have age-cracking, and there are a couple of cuts in the tread-blocks here and there. And they're all -- except possibly one? -- on 10-stud 335mm PCD wheels. If anyone's interested in 'em, for whatever reason, let me know!

And with that, I must sign off again... Spent near enough a full day doing an EGR valve on a Transit, thanks to a rounded bolt, and now I must go sleep in order to face up to the damn thing again because it didn't fix the warning light...

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Tyres are hard work even with the correct gear. When you get a one off use it as an anvil for the rest put them face to face after knocking back the spacer ring to free the locking ring then taking off the locking ring and spacer, drop a couple of bolts in some chocks under so that the tyre cannot fall all of the way onto the lower wheel then some soapy water on the top joint. Then it is just plain noisy walking around with a bead knocker or lump hammer and foot bar. A Kango hammer with a wide fairly blunt chisel is useful as they take some stick. I hate transit EGR valves. Good luck.  

Edited by john1950
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On 9/16/2021 at 7:44 AM, john1950 said:

Tyres are hard work even with the correct gear. When you get a one off use it as an anvil for the rest put them face to face after knocking back the spacer ring to free the locking ring then taking off the locking ring and spacer, drop a couple of bolts in some chocks under so that the tyre cannot fall all of the way onto the lower wheel then some soapy water on the top joint. Then it is just plain noisy walking around with a bead knocker or lump hammer and foot bar. A Kango hammer with a wide fairly blunt chisel is useful as they take some stick. I hate transit EGR valves. Good luck.  

The most insulting thing about those EGR valves is how you can see them -- from both sides, even! -- and still can't get to them. (And those metal gaskets, augh!)

I learnt to do truck tyres by the sledgehammer, angle iron, and levers method on tubeless tyres; it's still hard work, but at least there's fewer pieces to juggle afterwards! :D Work got a tyre machine a good few months back, now, and it's an absolute life-saver. I can have a tyre stripped down, turned, and back on; in the time it used to take me to break a stubborn bead. I've just got to not forget how to do them the old way...

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I have had to deal with several types of wheel 2 piece, 3 piece and 4 piece wheels before tubeless came along. Right up up Cat 627b size with ring locks.  I still have two light weight heel bars and an ally flat point. No large sledge hammers any more they all got stolen. Designers come up with engines to assemble in the factory but no thought seems to be given for the poor person who has to repair them. It seems strange to look back with fond memories on those times from retirement. One tyre fitter on the M62 Motorway near Manchester one super single trailer tyre 4min to change including bringing and taking the tyre to his van, (did not take the wheel off) took longer to inflate than change the tyre. Anyone near you with a green goddess so you could get a look at the sump.  

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11 hours ago, Tamber said:

I learnt to do truck tyres by the sledgehammer, angle iron, and levers method on tubeless tyres;

I had never seen that method until a mobile fitter came out to change a super single. He failed to break the inside bead without removing the wheel, set up his angle iron and was just about to hit it with the sledge as I legged it when I remembered how our depot tyre fitter lost a chunk out of his forehead. It worked but would have been much safer with a short chain and a dog clip to one of the stud holes.

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