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1958 pattern KFS Set 1970s-1980s


Falklands1982
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If you go on you tube and enter Lionheart 84 there are a series of films about the exercise gives a good idea of the scale of the exercise and equipment used and worn at that time.

We were not supposed to take cameras and take pictures for security reasons, before the days of mobile phones with cameras.

 

Thanks ill check it out :cheesy:

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I remember them well (KFS) I used to get a new set before every exercise along with half the regiment until the cookhouse cottoned on and a few weeks before excecises the plastic cutlery came out and they still disappeared from thhe cookhouse, nothing was safe in them days.

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I remember them well (KFS) I used to get a new set before every exercise along with half the regiment until the cookhouse cottoned on and a few weeks before excecises the plastic cutlery came out and they still disappeared from thhe cookhouse, nothing was safe in them days.

 

Alright so people used to pinch them?:-) Also were they ever carried in the 58 pack/ GS bergens on exercise/battle

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Cool, you were allowed to bring your own kit to the TA, also i thought the compass would have been a stanley prismatic compass rather than a silvia?

 

The prismatic compass was available from the stores but was bulky and expensive ,the silva compass was cheap and easy to use and did the job we wanted it for for.

The weapons we had were the 9mm Browning, GPMG, 9mm Stirling and the good old SLR. Also fired the Carl Gustav, 66mm Law rocket, and 81mm Morter but not very often . Also had access to M16 , Kalashnikov and Simonov Rifle.

 

I thought the M16 was only issued to those on Jungle carta?

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Alright so people used to pinch them?:-) Also were they ever carried in the 58 pack/ GS bergens on exercise/battle

 

 

No the KFS sets were carried in your Personal Webbing pattern 58. IE: The belt order & NOT the large pack.

Remember! The KFS was, apart from your Weapon. THE most important thing you had in the Field.

Food/Eating was a Priority for most of us. It was something to look forward to, & relive the bordom in some cases!

 

Centralised catering was better like this. Because it was almost a social event, meeting up with you mates. Having a scoff & a chat with a Brew as well! :D

 

It Was VERY Common for the KFS sets to be carried in the long pouch/tube. On the side of one of the 58 patt Ammo pouches.

These 'Tubes' originaly, were designed to carry either an Energa Grenade Launcher Attatchment. Or the LONGER Bullet catcher BFA.

But was QUICKLY discovered to be a good fit & an ideal facility. To carry our KFS sets! :cheesy:

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Were the KFS set used with the Compo rations also what is the tube/bag the KFS set was carried in?

 

Yes compo rations. & if your unit was lucky. Suplimented in centralised catering, with fresh rations like Veg Etc.

And eggs with your Compo Beans, Saussages, Fried Bread Etc for Breakfast.

 

The Tube was the same rubberised canvas as the wash role of the time.

basicly, a 'Tube' approx. 8" long. With a flap approx. 3" long. & a green cotton tie strap 8mm Wide x 14" long.

So you could fold the flap over the KFS. & close the flap & wind the Tie around & tuck the end in the wrap to secure.

 

It was very common & still practised to this day. With some front line & the 'Sneaky Peaky Boy's. To use a wooden Spoon for all eating of meals. This was deemed a Tactical move. as a wooden spoon, scraping in a Metal Mess tin.

Will not make a noise!

 

This has been modified in modern times, by using a sturdy Plastic spoon. Or right up to date. a Plastic Spork.

Which for those who havent seen one. Is an eating Impliment with a spoon at one end. & a Forked end at the opposite end.

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No the KFS sets were carried in your Personal Webbing pattern 58. IE: The belt order & NOT the large pack.

Remember! The KFS was, apart from your Weapon. THE most important thing you had in the Field.

Food/Eating was a Priority for most of us. It was something to look forward to, & relive the bordom in some cases!

 

Centralised catering was better like this. Because it was almost a social event, meeting up with you mates. Having a scoff & a chat with a Brew as well! :D

 

It Was VERY Common for the KFS sets to be carried in the long pouch/tube. On the side of one of the 58 patt Ammo pouches.

These 'Tubes' originaly, were designed to carry either an Energa Grenade Launcher Attatchment. Or the LONGER Bullet catcher BFA.

But was QUICKLY discovered to be a good fit & an ideal facility. To carry our KFS sets! :cheesy:

 

Ah ok this is a bit off topic but did anyone have a NO7 Field cooker or No12 Field cooker? or did you have to sign for it because you usually get the cooker with the hexis?

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  • 5 weeks later...

I joined the Regular Army, Infantry, in 1982 so my original issued kit was all ‘Falklands’ period kit - so to speak. We were issued a set of KFS, a green Osprey mug and two tin plates (the tin /aluminium plates were for use at camps where crockery was not provided i.e. central messing in the field or on some camps).

 

The items pictured are all army issue. However, note that there were lots of designs of KFS. They were all silver and plain like those pictured but with minor shape changes.

 

Out in the field things get lost or left behind easily, especially in the dark, so KFS often went missing. As long as you had a KFS in your kit the design wasn’t a problem so replacement with a civvy fork etc was common (as indeed was borrowing items from the NAAFI !).

 

As has been said, in camp you had to carry your own KFS and mug to the canteen so these were used every day.

 

Included in the picture are an exercise KFS set bound with black tape to keep them from rattling and a blue compo ration salt bottle – which comes from the ten man ration pack.

 

Hope this helps.Whats for tea.jpg

Edited by Exwoofer
silly formatting
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I joined the Regular Army, Infantry, in 1982 so my original issued kit was all ‘Falklands’ period kit - so to speak. We were issued a set of KFS, a green Osprey mug and two tin plates (the tin /aluminium plates were for use at camps where crockery was not provided i.e. central messing in the field or on some camps).

 

The items pictured are all army issue. However, note that there were lots of designs of KFS. They were all silver and plain like those pictured but with minor shape changes.

 

Out in the field things get lost or left behind easily, especially in the dark, so KFS often went missing. As long as you had a KFS in your kit the design wasn’t a problem so replacement with a civvy fork etc was common (as indeed was borrowing items from the NAAFI !).

 

As has been said, in camp you had to carry your own KFS and mug to the canteen so these were used every day.

 

Included in the picture are an exercise KFS set bound with black tape to keep them from rattling and a blue compo ration salt bottle – which comes from the ten man ration pack.

 

Hope this helps.[ATTACH=CONFIG]113041[/ATTACH]

 

Thank you for the helpful info and picture. Was the plate carried on you as I would have thought the mess tin would do the same job?

Regards

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The round plates (we were issued two) were carried in large packs or holdalls for use mainly in camps and indeed were often taken on the range for lunchtime servings of ‘range stew’ – mmmm lovely! This avoided dirtying your mess tins and having to unpack your webbing.

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Were the KFS set used with the Compo rations also what is the tube/bag the KFS set was carried in?

 

 

I forgot to add. When wearing 58 Patt Belt kit. There was a Tube like pouch on the side of the right ammo pouch. (The left had loops for the Bayonet) this was ORIGINALY for the ENERGA Grenade Launcher attachment. & later, the Long Bullet catching Blank Firing Attachment. We used to store the KFS sets in there all the time. As your webbing & personal Weapon WOULD be with you. EVERYWHERE you went! INCLUDING going to the toilet in the Field!.......

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The later 70's-80's dated versions. were exactly the same as sets issued in married quarters as well.

 

Makes sense logisticly, when you think about it! :)

 

Ah ok so they did make 70/80 dated sets as the latest I have come across is 64 would be interested to see a picture of a set if someone has some.:)

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One does have a solitary 1976 (iirc) fork knocking around somewhere, but not the somewhere I'm currently situated at.

 

However here's some 70's spoons and some 80's knives.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113108[/ATTACH]

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113109[/ATTACH]

H.M & Co. Ltd 1988

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113110[/ATTACH]

Harris Miller & Co. Sheffield 1986

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113111[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113112[/ATTACH]

[ATTACH=CONFIG]113113[/ATTACH]

 

If I ever find the fork I'll add that in unless some-one beats me to it, I think it's a 76 date or it's a 67 it's one of them.

 

The links you have provided are duds :undecided:

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  • 4 weeks later...
Were the KFS set used with the Compo rations also what is the tube/bag the KFS set was carried in?

 

It's taken me a few days to find them, but here are pics of my only remaining army issue cutlery, a 1988 knife, and the pouch which was issued to carry your 'diggers'. As you can see, the knife was too long to fit fully inside, although most forks and spoons did. I generally folded the flap over those and the knife blade stuck out at one side, but with the tape tied tight it was all secure.

 

I suspect few people did any length of service with their original KFS, as they were very easy to lose. I must have had about ten different sets during my service. The original ones were the old-fashioned 1950s EPNS ones and only in about the 1970s did I have stainless steel.

 

I hope this clears up all your questions.

 

Regards,

 

Steve.

 

IMG_2221.jpg

IMG_2220.jpg

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It's taken me a few days to find them, but here are pics of my only remaining army issue cutlery, a 1988 knife, and the pouch which was issued to carry your 'diggers'. As you can see, the knife was too long to fit fully inside, although most forks and spoons did. I generally folded the flap over those and the knife blade stuck out at one side, but with the tape tied tight it was all secure.

 

I suspect few people did any length of service with their original KFS, as they were very easy to lose. I must have had about ten different sets during my service. The original ones were the old-fashioned 1950s EPNS ones and only in about the 1970s did I have stainless steel.

 

I hope this clears up all your questions.

 

Regards,

 

Steve.

 

Managed to hang on the ones I was issued for 9 years :) Just a well because the QMS asked for them back when I got hit with the P8 discharge :-)

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As an addition to this thread, but related to it.

 

In the Field under strict Tactical conditions. 'Sneeky-Peaky' Recon & Intel Gathering units. As well as right up the front Infantry Units & the like.

 

Adopted the practice of using a small wooden spoon for eating from METAL Messtins & PLATES, when available.

The reason for this was wonderfully simple! Wood scraping against metal is virtually Silent.

Where as Metal against metal makes a noise. & you would be amazed at how far this noise can carry!

 

A passing Enemy Patrol or a sniper COULD hear this. & that would be your lot!....:nut:

 

Today, there are plastic spoons & a new design. That has become VERY popular with Troops in the Field. As well as being adopted by Civilian Campers Etc.

This is called a 'Spork'. And for those unfamiliar with the term, it is a single item of cutlery. Spoon ended at one end.

And a Fork at the opposite end.

 

Very practical, & one item less to carry about in your Belt Kit/ Fighting Order! ;)

 

I Believe Jack was giving these away as a Gift when purchasing one of His Tents. ;) (No I'm not on commission!) :D

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Hi,

 

Many thanks all for the pictures and various information. So was it just the 1950-1960 KFS set that was re-issued during the 70-80s period? Also did anyone get the jungle 44 pattern KFS set in the 60-80 period?

 

I am not sure what you mean by '1950-1960 KFS set'?

 

To my knowledge - a set of KFS was issued - of a simple, plain, stainless steel design - was issued from at least the 50s onwards. The exact style changed over the years as new contracts were placed and there are most likely dated examples for every year from then to today (given that these get replaced very often due to loses). Anchor Surplus (army surplus shop) used to have a massive tub full of 2nd hand issue KFS in their shop - whilst sorting through these I found examples from multiple decades and years.

 

As for the 44 KFS - these were not issued by the 80s when I was in but my Dad was issued in a set in about 1962 during National Service and he was BAOR based for his 2 years service. Some lads may have used such a set later in later years, as indeed I did at times, but these would have been their own item - not a set issued to them. I think the 44 KFS set stopped being issued in the 60s but don't have a record for this.

 

NSN and arrow marked KFS were used in camp canteens, NAAFI's, married quarters and camp messes (i.e. Officers mess) and these were often 'borrowed'. So at any time you would have found pre-dated KFS in use later - i.e. 60s/70s dated ones being used in the 80s and 80s dated ones used later on etc.

 

Hope this helps.

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