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Scammell Pioneer Restoration


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  • 4 weeks later...
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Bit of progress on the Scammell. We're well on with the wooden lockers and have ordered the last of the timber to do the tops. Installed the radiator and test fitted the bonnet to check fit up.

Reassembled most of the winch yesterday  

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve painted the inside of the cab, fitted it out with some of the bits n pieces and then painted the outside. We’ve got to test run the engine now before refitting the c

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Been reassembling the air compressor. Had to make all new studs (except head studs) for it since some heavy handed REME mechanic had stretched all the threads. Got new oil seals but the O/D is smaller than the original so will have to turn up sleeves to take up the difference, and i'm making all new gaskets for it.

 

Also i've used a part which might be of interest to other restorers, a thing called a speedi sleeve. They are made by SKF and are used where an oil seal has worn a groove in a shaft, the sleeve fits tightly over the shaft, has a cylindrically ground O/D thus providing a new surface for the oil seal to bear upon. They are available in many standard sizes metric and imperial. I have the SKF catalogue on pdf giving all the sizes available, if anyone wants it PM me your email address.

 

The speedi sleeve

 

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Guts of the compressor

 

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Speedi sleeve in position

 

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Trial assembly of mounting bracket to finally position the sleeve on the shaft

 

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Richard

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Speedisleeves are the next best thing to sliced bread.

 

Wonderful product, just a bit unforgiving if you don't get them going nice and square on at the begining, when they will fold like a pretzel.

 

Have used them a number of times, quite common usage over here.

 

R

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Speedi or Redi sleeves from Chicago Rawhide ( who developed them I think ) or SKF are just the ticket for sleeving worn universal drive shaft yokes into or out of gearboxes and transfer cases.

 

You have to watch the fitted width, though, to make sure the new sleeve section lands exactly where it is needed, and if I have a yoke with really severe wear I fill the wear groove with body filler ( no - really - ordinary filler ) and then sand it flat to give the sleeve some support as they are only thousandth's of a inch thick.

 

If you need to use them, download a catalogue for any manufacturer and just get the reference number you need, as they are treated like bearings in that a particular size all have the same reference number, just the manufacturer's prefix is different to denote manufacturer and material.

 

Once you have determined the number, just search E-Pay, and if necessary set up a standing search till you get the ones you want. Single sleeves can be quite expensive, retail - a typical Dodge yoke sleeve can retail at up to about £50 - or you can get five or six for the same price off E-Pay if you watch for them and grab them when available.

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 3 months later...

As i can see yours is much further along in the works than the one i am working on!

 

I wish you luck with yours anyway, they are great vehicles to work on, and there aren't many around!

 

Thanks,

 

Nick

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  • 5 months later...

While were waiting for the white metal bearings man to do his bit with the engine, we thought we'd get on with a few other bits, so i spent my christmas holiday rebuilding the winch drive.

It was so covered in grease and dirt that i couldn't even make out the nuts and bolts holding it together.

Still, fully stripped and cleaned heres some photos of it going back together.

 

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The nut that goes on the bottom of the shaft in the picture above had been done up so tight the thread was nearly totally stripped, so i found a nut of similar A/F size in the workshop, bored it out, screw cut the 1.5 BSF thread and milled some split pin slots - sorted.

 

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Coming back together now

 

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and as it stands now, nearly finished waiting for the brake and dog clutch assembly.

 

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Richard

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Help please!!!

Dad and I went to start taking off the brake drums today. We have the original hub nut spanner so getting the big nut off wasn't too much of a problem. Now we are trying to get the drum off, it is mounted on a tapered shaft with two keys. We made up a puller similar to that shown in the back of the manual by drilling a hole in a spare hub cap and welding a large nut on the inside, the mating large bolt provides the pulling force. However, with this device in place the drum/hub won't budge, and I'm at my wits end as to what to do now.

The only solution I can come up with is to make up some sort of puller that I can get a powerful hydraulic ram into.

Has anyone here tackled this job before?

Any comment much appreciated. Richard

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Richard,

 

I haven't done this job on the Scammell but have had to do similar things on the Landrovers. One method to remove really stubborn ones was to wind the load on as high as possible then spray with release/penetrating fluid. Then try giving the drum a few taps with a sledge. If that doesn't work leave it under load for a few days giving it a spray of release fluid every couple of days. Then try tightening again.

 

Ed

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Richard,

 

I haven't done this job on the Scammell but have had to do similar things on the Landrovers. One method to remove really stubborn ones was to wind the load on as high as possible then spray with release/penetrating fluid. Then try giving the drum a few taps with a sledge. If that doesn't work leave it under load for a few days giving it a spray of release fluid every couple of days. Then try tightening again.

 

Ed

 

Hi chaps , thats how my Explorer hubs came off with a lot of force on the puller then a few sharp blows with a sledge on the hub ! Big bang then off they came ! Explorer hubs are a bit younger though !:D Good luck with them ! :D

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Thanks for the replays guys.

What did you use for a puller Andy? My make shift puller has an M36 nut and bolt which I think is prob a bit coarse. I'm gonna get a long spanner plasma profiled this week out of 20mm plate, nice and long so we can get lots of leverage on it, and give that a go.

It certainly wasn't designed for ease of maintenance!

Richard

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Lucky enough to have bought the puller in the past mate ! Borrowed Bernards spanner to tighten the hub nuts when refitting ! :-D The photo of me on the end of the bar was taken just before that hub suddenly came undone and dropped me straight onto part of the crane frame ! OUCH ! Won't do that again without looking at the landing area ! :-D

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Here is a genuine Explorer hub puller and my home made hub spanner....the hex part was cut from some 1" plate which was then welded to some tube with a wall thickness of 3/4". I then used a fordson major rear arm as the leg for the spanner.....The spanner needs to be able to rest on a block of wood.....The book states there is no point jumping on the spanner....it must be hit with a sledge hammer on the arm to sufficiently loosen or tighten the nut.....which is why i made it out of such solid stuff.....I found it the easiest of jobs to do and managed to tighten up to the scribed lines with only a few wallops.....

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Looking at the problem you're trying to solve (and unfortunately not having a Pioneer to try it on!), I wonder if it mightn't be relatively simple to make a hydraulic puller for this job.

 

If you obtained an Enerpac RC series cylinder of a suitable size (which can often be obtained for reasonable money off eBay) you could machine an adaptor which bolts onto the hub (like the puller illustrated above) and which has an internal thread which matches the external thread on the outside of the cylinder. Extending the ram would then either remove the hub or break something.

 

The rams are available in a huge range of sizes and capacities, see http://www.enerpac.com/en/industrial-tools/hydraulic-cylinders-jacks-lifting-products-and-systems/general-purpose-hydraulic-cylinders/rc-series-single-acting-hydraulic-cylinders

 

It seems to me that the relative simplicity of the adaptor and the much greater mechanical efficiency of a co-axial hydraulic pull might make this an attractive and simple solution.

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Hi utt61,

Yeah hydraulics were going to be the last resort. I've used a similar setup to that you described for pulling/pushing big pins out of hinged joints on dockside and offshore cranes before.

Since my last post I've actually had an offer of a lend of a puller, and I've posted ads to hopefully acquire my own.

Thanks, Richard

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hi scammell 4199, made a puller from the hubcap myself, worked a treat, the secret is to keep on tightening until the drum comes off, it will take a lot of force but they will come off, did all four of mine and will be going to a pioneer owner on friday to remove his drums aswell.

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Hi John, yeah I made one from a spare hub cap, the problem is I think I used too coarse a thread to apply the force.

I've managed to borrow a fellow HMVFers made up puller to be going on with till I find a nice big nut and bolt with a finer thread.

Many thanks for your reply. Richard

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Hi John, yeah I made one from a spare hub cap, the problem is I think I used too coarse a thread to apply the force.

I've managed to borrow a fellow HMVFers made up puller to be going on with till I find a nice big nut and bolt with a finer thread.

Many thanks for your reply. Richard

 

use a large metric cap head bolt, its harder than a normal 8.8 you will need an allen key to fit but easier to put some scaffold tube on though than a spanner. john

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