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Hi all,

 

Im new to this site. Im looking at restoring a J type Thornycroft here in Australia as a commemoration to the 100 year centenary of WW1. I found the Thornycroft restoration thread on this site awesome. I have restored a few military vehicles and current own an Australian Mk1/2 Ferret. I just finished a full rebuild on the B60 engine. New everything, but am yet to turn the key, so hopefully it will go. Other than that, pleased to be a part of this site and hopefully can add to the Thornycroft and Ferret discussions.

 

Regards, Tim

Aust Ferret 115161

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Here are some photos of the thornycroft as requested. I grew up in Western Queensland where the environment is hot and dry. This truck sat on this hill throughout my early childhood and was known more for its role in being used as an early mining truck.

thornycroft 1.jpg

thornycroft 2.jpg

thornycroft 3.jpg

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Here is my little Ferret! This vehicle was a complete wreck when I first got it about four years ago. Ive just finished a full motor rebuild and am about to do the engine exchange in the coming weeks. This is it driven down to my kids school for ANZAC day last year. I found this in a paddock, full of water after sitting there for many many years. It was pretty much nothing but the hull and a collection of weathered parts. Australia, particularly Far North Queensland isn't the easiest place to get parts, so much of it Ive had to fabricate myself or with the help of my talented friends. Hopefully my experience with Ferrets and Saracens may prepare me for the Thornycroft. I hate to generalise, but being British machines, I expect that nothing will come easy, nothing will be simple, and everything will take four times longer than planned. If you want to check out OZITIM on youtube, you will see my Saracen restoration as well.

 

Regards, OZITIM

 

 

ferret 2.jpg

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[

These are the only photos I have. But looking forward to the expert analysis!

 

 

QUOTE=Minesweeper;403944]Wait for the Experts to come in - but low-level radiator - a post war civilian version? Do you have any photos of the motor?

 

Tony

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There are a lot more knowledgeable people on this Forum than me - and I am surprised that they have not joined in yet! Your photos are not too special to help and it would be good if you could put up some more - with closer detail!

 

But it appears to me that the end of the chassis has been sawn off - about two feet of it and that a winch has been put on one side, perhaps to drive off the gearbox? Hence that funny arrangement of poles and levers on the side - or is that the remains of a cab?

The war-time Thornys had a high radiator with the starting handle situated underneath it. With the later (Civilian?) ones, the radiator was of a different type and situated much lower with the starting handle going through the bottom of the radiator - like this one.

 

It would be nice to see a picture of the motor - so that it can be confirmed that it is an original Thornycroft M4. Is there a brass number plate on the motor, giving its number?

 

All very interesting - Forum members enjoy puzzles like this one!

 

Tony

Edited by Minesweeper
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Ok, I will instruct someone to get around there tomorrow and get me some photos of the engine and see if they can locate a chassis number.

 

 

There are a lot more knowledgeable people on this Forum than me - and I am surprised that they have not joined in yet! Your photos are not too special to help and it would be good if you could put up some more - with closer detail!

 

But it appears to me that the end of the chassis has been sawn off - about two feet of it and that a winch has been put on one side, perhaps to drive off the gearbox? Hence that funny arrangement of poles and levers on the side - or is that the remains of a cab?

The war-time Thornys had a high radiator with the starting handle situated underneath it. With the later (Civilian?) ones, the radiator was of a different type and situated much lower with the starting handle going through the bottom of the radiator - like this one.

 

It would be nice to see a picture of the motor - so that it can be confirmed that it is an original Thornycroft M4. Is there a brass number plate on the motor, giving its number?

 

All very interesting - Forum members enjoy puzzles like this one!

 

Tony

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You should be able to find the both the engine and chassis numbers stamped in together on top of the front left chassis rail - left as you look towards the front - right at the front just where the rail bends down! There should also be a brass plate measuring 4" x 2" on top of the engine crank case as well - marked John I Thornycroft with the engine number stamped in.

 

Make sure your friend takes a wire brush with him to get under any rust!

 

Tony

 

Look at Posting No. 1078 on page 108 of the Thorny Restoration thread to help you locate the numbers!

Edited by Minesweeper
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