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18 pounder limber


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I've confirmed that the long limber is for a 60 pounder and also that the "projectile" is in fact a barrel gauge. Apparently, you drop it down the barrel to check the bore.

 

I think it's more likely to be a proof shot, since it has a driving band on it. (The projectile for a proof round doesn't need to be aerodynamic, so tends to be cylindrical.) I doubt very much that you'd be able to "drop it down the barrel" and get it out again without a great deal of effort - probably involving a very long hydraulic jack or a suitable baulk of timber and a sledgehammer.

 

Chris.

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Not interested in the limber as well?

 

There is a meeting tonight, I'll make some enquiries - just remember it's in Adelaide, South Australia so shipping will not be cheap.

 

Cheers,

Terry

 

Hi Terry, I have a shipping plan sorted but it will depend on how much the Chassis will cost if it is worth doing. Hopefully we can work something out as it will save me a lot of fabrication.

 

The other limber is the wrong type for me. Sorry

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Not interested in the limber as well?

 

There is a meeting tonight, I'll make some enquiries - just remember it's in Adelaide, South Australia so shipping will not be cheap.

 

Cheers,

Terry

 

Find a household removal company and see if they can ship in a consolidated container (ie where you share the container with others) - may take 3 or 4 months... I have used this approach to ship from the UK to Australia several times and find it a cheap and reliable service.

 

Failing that maybe a website like "despatchbay" is worth a look.

 

Tim

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  • 2 weeks later...

OFG Hogg is the man you need. Pgs 286/7 of his book 'Artillery: Its Origin, Heyday and Decline' has a table giving the key data for all the main field guns in the world in 1910, he lists 25 from 24 countries (everyone made their own guns in those days).

 

For 18-pr and 13-pr:

Rds in Limber: 24

Rds in Wagon Limber: 28

Rds in Wagon Body: 48

Rds per gun 176

No of guns per bty: 6

No of wagons per bty: 12

Wt of wagon packed (18-pr): 36.75 cwt

Wt of gun (18-pr): 9 cwt

Wt of gun & carriage: 24.75 cwt

Wt of gun & limber filled: 40 cwt

 

Its also interesting that in developing 18-pr the requirement was for the limbers to provide protection to the detachment, along with the gun shield, from small arms fire over a reasonably wide arc, a lesson from S Africa. This suggests there was a certain thickness of steel.

 

It's also useful to note that for 18-pr the detachment rode on the Wagon with the gun not the gun limber (the second wagon per gun was under bty arrangements), of course for RHA 13-pr every man had a horse. Unfortunately he doesn't provide figures for 4.5 in How but it would have been less rds per wagon or limber. All this should help work out which type of limber you have.

 

Bethel is another useful source, his 'Modern Artillery in the Field' 1910, also gives 176 rpg for 18 and 13 pr, and offers 112 for 4.5 (6 gun bty) and 76 for 60-pr (4 gun bty). The practice of two wagons per gun seems to have been standard and 40-cwt for a 6 horse team of the light vanner type seems about the upper limit. Of course 60-pr used draft horses.

 

I can't help but wonder how many museums have got their limbers mixed up!

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  • 2 months later...
Hello LBDR and Ray,

 

just so happens that I am doing an 18Pr restoration in Sydney. So far have the gun, gun limber and hind ammo wagon - just need the front ammo wagon of the type found by Ray to complete the set.

 

In the bits and pieces accumulated over the past 10 years, I have some spares of some of the items for sale/swap. I am pretty sure that a spare hind ammo wagon is amongst them, as converted to pneumatic wheels (unfortunately no axle, only the cast supports).

 

That may be of interest to LBDR and others, but the type shown in the photo posted by LBDR looks like a front ammo wagon with wooden draw bar replaced by a steel perch and stay bars. Australia used the rear ammo wagon as it had the steel perch already, and did not need much upgrading. An example is at the Lytton museum in Brisbane. Other hind ammo wagons were also used behind infantry support tanks in PNG to carry small arms ammo in the advance.

 

The WW1 gun limbers and front ammo wagons were not used in Australia in WW2. The difference between the gun limber and ammo wagons is that gun limber used 3 tiers and ammo wagon used 4, so is noticeably higher.

 

regards,

 

Damien Nicholas aka Nick

 

Hi Damien wondering if you could tell me what spares you may have for sale for the limbers chasing a break assembly for the rear limber Regards Tim

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  • 6 months later...
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Hi

I have question do anyone recognize this box?. It was discovered on attic old school in some city on Lower Silesia (Poland). Before war there were many units like 3 Posen Inf Regiment no 58 or 2 Niederschlesisches Feld-Artillerie Regiment No 41.

There were some letters on the front: "V A.K." and "3 A.M. K. E S" below. I think that "V A K" might be "V Armee Korps" (Most of city's units were belongs to this Korps). What means letters below?

 

I've searched so many websites and didn't find anything

Thank you for your help.

3.JPG

2.JPG

1.jpg

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Hi

I have question do anyone recognize this box?. It was discovered on attic old school in some city on Lower Silesia (Poland). Before war there were many units like 3 Posen Inf Regiment no 58 or 2 Niederschlesisches Feld-Artillerie Regiment No 41.

There were some letters on the front: "V A.K." and "3 A.M. K. E S" below. I think that "V A K" might be "V Armee Korps" (Most of city's units were belongs to this Korps). What means letters below?

 

I've searched so many websites and didn't find anything

Thank you for your help.

 

Hello.

 

Its not an 18 pdr limber box ,doesn't resemble any other British limber.

 

Rob....................rnixartillery

Edited by rnixartillery
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Hello.

 

Its not an 18 pdr limber box ,doesn't resemble any other British limber.

 

Rob....................rnixartillery

 

Yes. I know

But I didn't find any other post about limber boxes.

So I write here about "my" box

It's rather Prussian than British. Krupp? Maybe.

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