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anyone heard of this guy


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On my seemingly endless search for a 216 engine for our CMP C60L wrecker (one day we will get one and finally get it on road but it has been 3 years and still nothing)

 

I recently placed an ad on milweb looking for same and received a reply, copied below, which sounds just a wee bit too good to be true hehe (TFIC) a 216 engine for $300 including shipping and a very short delivery time. my question is has anyone else had a promise like this from same person ( goes by name of Jon) and john g partss is email address but although it would be great and sounds too good to be true, and in $'s from UK ??? I wonder if anyone has been caught up in similar promise etc Also I have never ever written to same person although his email says otherwise....I think that some poor vulnerable and unaware people might succumb to his promise, caveat emptor chaps! If it is genuine and he is known I apologise profusely.

 

Gary

 

 

Hello,

 

Thanks for writing, I still have a Chevrolet 216 engine for sale in excellent condition and decent shape. I have already made shipping inquires and will take a $300 USD shipped. Asking price includes shipping via UPS or FedEx which ever you prefer on a 3 - 4 days delivery, and l'll accept payment via Western union or Moneygram.

 

What's your complete shipping address?

 

Thanks,

 

John

 

Also another mail from same person (John to Jon this time)

 

 

Jon jon.g.partss@gmail.com

 

Address: 113 Digby St Scunthorpe, Dn15 7LU UK, England

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Agreed hence the TFIC (Tongue Firmly in Cheek) what I need now is someone in Scunthorpe who lives near that address to see what is /who lives at that address, the property register has it as a house over 650K.

 

The realistic mailing alone is about double his asking price without an engine lol

 

might string him along for a while to tie up his resources and save someone else from getting pestered by him/her/it.

 

Gary

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Scam....

 

And before you put a brick through his window the address wont be real either!

 

Sadly there are people out there who waste their lives doing this. Its not hard to do and I guess he only needs 1 person in a hundred to fall for it and he's in profit...

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Scam....

 

And before you put a brick through his window the address wont be real either!

 

Sadly there are people out there who waste their lives doing this. Its not hard to do and I guess he only needs 1 person in a hundred to fall for it and he's in profit...

 

and its more like 3 in a hundred by all accounts that fall for it...heard it on tv or somewhere to with another scam artist. they make a small fortune out of people like us...

 

the good ones are impossible to identify, even when you have paid them and they do not send the goods you think its someone elses fault, the banks the postal company...these are one of the worst kinds of humanity around...

 

I sent 500 pounds to a guy in poland, He pretends to trade in this business, but i never got my engine, and I know of four other people who traded with him and got nothing...but milweb will not take him off the advertising list unless someone sues him and it is 'proven through court' I sort of understand this but with five people now out of pocket surely thats good enough to put a halt to it..or do we have to wait for even more people to lose their money...

 

I know HMVF have stopped his membership and thats right...well done our boys but milweb wont...poor show on their part...we all have to work to stop fraud not just the courts...have yopu ever tried taking a foreigner to court...I have cost me the value of four DROPS trucks, we won, all that moneyback and more and never got a penny. Courts dont work..

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sad to hear that, unfortunately too many out there, it is like a minefield. and so many from west africa it seems, I pity any decent trader or customer from there as people tend to tar all with same brush and shy away.

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Scam....

 

And before you put a brick through his window the address wont be real either!

 

Sadly there are people out there who waste their lives doing this. Its not hard to do and I guess he only needs 1 person in a hundred to fall for it and he's in profit...

 

It's a real address allright, one minute on google earth proves that, though I doubt the resident knows of any Chevrolet engines!

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Years ago my father was ripped of by a conman who bought a camcorder for £600, he paid by cheque and gave an address in the stockton area . So naturally the cheque bounced and we took a trip down to the address , the owner said it happens at least twice a month that someone knocks at his door asking for there money back.

And i sent an email to milweb about 6 months ago regarding someone selling a walther p38 pistol claiming it to be an original de-act 1940's pistol, but the picture was clear to see it was a replica . But i never got a reply.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've nearly been caught a few times but luckily always managed to avoid it. From many years working in the Motor Industry I have a golden rule, never part with your money until you have the goods in your hand and never let anything go unless you have cleared funds (careful, sometimes even money put directly in your bank can be taken back again and bankers drafts are really not worth the paper they are written on).

 

I've always found that genuine buyers and sellers are not offended by you being careful, cash is a great option but even with that also be careful. I once took a large amount of money for something I was selling I went with the buyer to my bank and paid it in to my account as once the bank say its not forged notes and taken it its not your problem and then took him back to pick up the vehicle, again he understood as he was genuine and wanted the vehicle and understood that there are forged £50 notes around.

 

The other thing I have seen is 'renting' address's, its usually with high value executive used cars. The car is stolen, a forged V5 is made (the DVLA 'lost 300,000 of the old blue V5's a few years ago which resulted in them having to replace every one in the country with the latest red V5C as many of these reappeared as forgeries) and the address on the V5 is the same one as the buyer visits. The address has been rented for the day usually from some lowlife who goes away for the day. Therefore you visit, go in the house even get given a cup of tea, the car looks ok, the V5 is there and it matches the address. The car then gets identified as stolen as you tax, insure or MOT it the next time, you go back to the address and nobody knows anything about it saying he house must have been broken into when they were away. As the law says 'buyer beware' the car goes back to its owner and you lose the car and money with no comeback to anybody.

 

If in doubt about when funds are cleared ask your bank they will explain, within Car Dealerships a very strict set of rules are usually in place about taking money and if a say Sales Person doesn't follow the rules its instant dismissal. You then also have a law about having to declare all cash transactions over £10,000 (money laundering legislation) so don't walk into a bank with more than £10k in your pocket as the questions will really start and it may have to be notified by law to the Police.

 

Sorry to sound frightening be aware and its fine but you have to be on your toes, if you are buying in our hobby it can be tough, if you are buying a used 'normal' car always HPI it properly and ask for further ID.

 

Andy

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I once took a large amount of money for something I was selling I went with the buyer to my bank and paid it in to my account as once the bank say its not forged notes and taken it its not your problem and then took him back to pick up the vehicle, again he understood as he was genuine and wanted the vehicle and understood that there are forged £50 notes around.Andy

 

Just as well you went to the bank with your buyer, it would have been difficult to prove the forged notes were his.

 

I once lost £5ks worth of audio kit to a credit card scam, the courier delivered the goods to an empty house with two guys polishing a car on the drive who signed for the parcel. I had even rung Streamline the CC processing company as the deal sounded strange but was abruptly told 'the money is in your account, what's the problem?' Two days later the money was clawed back from our account.

 

A contact sold his £20k Range Rover to someone from London who was coming up on the train with a draft and correctly told the buyer that it had to be during banking hours so that he could confirm the draft with the issuing bank. The buyer rang to say his train had been delayed, the deadline passed and greed at being offered the full price took over and the draft was accepted. You know the rest...

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