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AEC ? unearthed from under bungalow/shack


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I'm sure somebody will enlighten me as to model ect of my latest can't let that go for scrap !The story was that it had a showmans living van on it which the grand-parents of the family that lived in it until a few years ago bought it in the 20's,and over a period of 80+ years grew into a bungalow and became the utility room after a succession of additions.Anyway the site was being cleared and it was mine for the scrap money so we collected it last week and i know very little about WW1 lorries .I think it is an AEC going by the wheels apart from i can't quite match the rear wheels as they are more or less solid centres with small oval holes which don't match up with any of the AEC's i've found on the web.The chassis is a laminate of steel/ash/steel unfortunatly its been cut and extended but can be returned to original spec without to much effort.On the whole it seems in ok'ish order considering where its been i think its ex army as there's traces of faded green paint under the black.If anybody can shine some light on it that would be great,thanks DuncanP1010007.jpg

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An interesting discovery. Certainly looks like an AEC Y Type, but with a lot of modifications. Rear wheels look like they came from a Daimler CB, but could easily be off something else. Probably best to preserve as a living van frame, unless you know someone with a Tylor engine for it. There was a restored living van with Y type chassis on E Bay a few weeks ago. Opening bid was around £16,000. Dont know if it sold though.

 

Tim

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Thanks for everybody's input,i think for the time being it will be given a clean and put in the shed and see if we come across a period engine and box.Out of interest have many of these survived and of these survivors are there any restored or being restored?Hats off to the guys doing the Dennis i'm up to about p33 now.

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Would appear to be a Daimler CB which has been got at. The CB was first listed in July1913 but did not become available until March 1914, built at Radford Park works , Coventry. A small number were sold to civillian customers before August 1914 after which virtually the entire production until April 1917 went to the WD, the exceptions being where required for Government contract work. Rated as 2 ton ( 30 cwt WD ) and fitted RAC rated 22.9 HP sleeve valve engine ( 30 HP) and overhead worm final drive. Serial number should be between 800 and 2899 and should be stamped on the side of the chassis frame somewhere near to where the cab step would be. Vast numbers were sold post WW1 to become lorries,buses and charabancs.

Richard Peskett.

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To clarify the manufacturing situation with AEC and Daimler what follows is only a summary, there are variations. In 1909 the London General Omnibus Co. had realised that all the vehicles which had come from a variety of manufactures all had problems and were unsuited for London use. In view of this Frank Searle chief engineer decided to build a vehicle using the best ideas from all the assortment then in use. A flitch plate frame ( wood/steel snandwich ) was used ( taken from the French De Dion chassis). Known as the 'B' these vehicles were built in their own workshops at Walthamstow and by 1914 some 2500 had been produced, intended solely for use by the London General a company The Associated Equipment Co. was set up as a whole owned subsiduary. Overproduction meant some were sold to outside London. Searle moved to Daimler at Coventry in 1911 and by late 1912 a new factory at Radford Park was producing the 'CC', a similar design to the 'B' but with sleeve valve engine, in 1914 a smaller 'CB' model was produced as well as both light and heavy tractors. In 1914 two other models the 'Y' and the 'Daimler B'. all with flitch plate frames and sleeve valve engines, it would seem that these were built at Walthamstow. Daimler lorry production at Coventry ceased in April 1917. The Walthamstow production then continued with the 'Y' type, only a few were built with flitch frames (model YA) and following came the 'YB' and YC' all with pressed steel frames and Tylor engines. Production of these ceased about 1920 and reverted to London bus production ( K, S, etc.) with flitch plate frames again. Daimler continued at Coventry in 1919 with the CJ / CK series again with flitch plate frames and sleeve valve engines until about 1924.

Richard Peskett.

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Would appear to be a Daimler CB which has been got at. The CB was first listed in July1913 but did not become available until March 1914, built at Radford Park works , Coventry. A small number were sold to civillian customers before August 1914 after which virtually the entire production until April 1917 went to the WD, the exceptions being where required for Government contract work. Rated as 2 ton ( 30 cwt WD ) and fitted RAC rated 22.9 HP sleeve valve engine ( 30 HP) and overhead worm final drive. Serial number should be between 800 and 2899 and should be stamped on the side of the chassis frame somewhere near to where the cab step would be. Vast numbers were sold post WW1 to become lorries,buses and charabancs.

Richard Peskett.

 

We've just had a bit of luck,under some fossilised crud on top of the f/n/s axle low and behold the cast brass chassis plate.

Type CB22

Car No 1623

List No 16166

just the r/n/s brake to free off and were ready to roll !!!

 

ps thanks Richard you seem to know more than a bit.

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  • 2 years later...

Update,over the last couple of years i've been on the quest for Daimler parts i was fortunate to be able to buy the remains of another CB22 so i will combine the best of everything to make a good one as it were.Just after NewYear all the parts i had acquired were placed in the chassis so it would give me a feel for the missing/yet to find or make parts as my Wednesday night crew thought it would be good to have it finished for this WW1 centinary.On the look out for a suitable engine i found a 1920's 70A 6 cyl Knight in exceptional condition and just needed some minor sorting out and some poor repairs redoing.I intend using this engine for the time being and it also has the benefit of electric start :blush: .The Willis gearbox is going to be locked in top gear as it drives straight through which will enable me to use the Daimler CB22 gearbox i bought. Unfortunately the Daimler gearbox was 1/2 full of water which had damaged all the bearings but the rest was all reusable and is now in the process of strip and clean.Over the last couple of weeks we have got into it in ernest as Wednesday night usually four or five of us and saturday mornings being the lorry time.I've decided to paint it as per 1916 army colours ,i should really paint it Flying corps being ex RAF MTSS :cool2: but army it will be.I will add more up dates as and when but we intend this lorry to look the part but it will be a bitsa and it will be fine tuned and any details we can't live with will become a work in progress but with a bit of luck we are trying to get it finished for next year and its centenary.P1020480.jpg

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We had quite a productive few evenings this week,all the gears cleaned and the rather nice RHP and FAG bearings came in but ran out of time to reassemble this weekend.The body is taking shape just got to make the iron work to hold it all in place.From all the CB22 photos i have i scaled the body and cab dimensions from known dimensions mainly the wheels and hopefully i'll end up with something fairly close to the genuine item ,constructive comments welcome as i'm confident all the body dims are within.One of the nice things about this project is it is all metric,of interest the original bearings in the gearbox were Swiss ,is it me but they seem to do well out of wars !.

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I must confess to being absolutely fascinated watching the endeavours of the Gosling family, Ben Hawkins and Dan the Steam (amongst others) and admire their skill, ingenuity and sheer tenacity as they strive to create an original, working vehicle from the starting point of an old bare chassis. Now here's another piece of history being brought back from the dead.

 

A magnificent project chaps, I look forward to watching this one progress.

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Quite a productive few evenings this week ,dummy fitted the "cab" what there is of it for the first time just to double check the fuel tank and brackets fit.On the whole we are all quite pleased with it as we are about to embark on a crash course on steaming ash to make the roof.Decided to use Sapele for the cab and body as we had experience with soft wood and sap on a earlier project and it didn't make a blind bit of differance with the knot stopper the paintwork suffered.Added a photo of John and Roy as they both had a camera shy moment as they uttered the words "go away"(similar) we have all been life long friends with many shared projects under our belts who's help along with Steve ,Ted and Tony would mean our projects wouldn't proceed as quickly.We also had to offer the rad up because thats the law and we wanted to see how and if the proportions was the same as the period photos we have.

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It is interesting to me to compare the Daimler rad, with cast side cheeks and multiple tie-bars with the brass radiator on our 1916 Dennis, which is barely held together at all.

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/108164504656404380542/Jez11114?noredirect=1#6125867264164481682

 

That radiator is sheets of brass soft-soldered together. The photo shows what we found chasing a leak. We removed the outer plate that the mounting trunnion was riveted to. The rusty mess is the backing plate for the trunnion rivets. It wasn't doing much...

 

So, where the Daimler has castings and tie-bars the Dennis has a top and bottom tank made of brass sheet and then then a box (made of 4 sheets) joining them but not soldered to the core (probably wise).

 

No wonder we spend so much of our time chasing leaks. That photo was the result of an investigation based on "Hang on, there shouldn't even be water in that part of the rad, let alone leaks"

 

<Jealous of competently designed radiaiators>

Edited by andypugh
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Had the springs sand blasted as they were covered in a thick black paint which was difficult to scrape off in all the joints between the leaves.After blasting a pleasant surprise was the numbers and Leeds being stamped in them.We got the king pins out one evening last week after drilling out the cotter pins and putting them under the press.Gearbox all together apart from one bearing which is due in this week,had a chuckle about the oil required for the gear box as it states "thick black oil" whatever that is.

In answer to the previous post we haven't got as far as filling our rad yet but we have a couple of snags to over come with ours as it is as i bought it and just needs finishing off but i think ours may contain a tad more ally LOL.

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I'm sure somebody will enlighten me as to model ect of my latest can't let that go for scrap !The story was that it had a showmans living van on it which the grand-parents of the family that lived in it until a few years ago bought it in the 20's,and over a period of 80+ years grew into a bungalow and became the utility room after a succession of additions.Anyway the site was being cleared and it was mine for the scrap money so we collected it last week and i know very little about WW1 lorries .I think it is an AEC going by the wheels apart from i can't quite match the rear wheels as they are more or less solid centres with small oval holes which don't match up with any of the AEC's i've found on the web.The chassis is a laminate of steel/ash/steel unfortunatly its been cut and extended but can be returned to original spec without to much effort.On the whole it seems in ok'ish order considering where its been i think its ex army as there's traces of faded green paint under the black.If anybody can shine some light on it that would be great,thanks Duncan[ATTACH=CONFIG]61253[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61254[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61255[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61256[/ATTACH]

1918. Thornycroft X-type.??? http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Im090510B-ThoXtype-18.jpg

Edited by Trooper2196
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I'm sure somebody will enlighten me as to model ect of my latest can't let that go for scrap !The story was that it had a showmans living van on it which the grand-parents of the family that lived in it until a few years ago bought it in the 20's,and over a period of 80+ years grew into a bungalow and became the utility room after a succession of additions.Anyway the site was being cleared and it was mine for the scrap money so we collected it last week and i know very little about WW1 lorries .I think it is an AEC going by the wheels apart from i can't quite match the rear wheels as they are more or less solid centres with small oval holes which don't match up with any of the AEC's i've found on the web.The chassis is a laminate of steel/ash/steel unfortunatly its been cut and extended but can be returned to original spec without to much effort.On the whole it seems in ok'ish order considering where its been i think its ex army as there's traces of faded green paint under the black.If anybody can shine some light on it that would be great,thanks Duncan[ATTACH=CONFIG]61253[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61254[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61255[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]61256[/ATTACH]

 

http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/File:Im090510B-ThoXtype-18.jpg

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  • 5 weeks later...

Had a bit of luck as i managed to buy the remains of an original 1916 Daimler Knight engine which was an adventure on its own to collect but worth the effort.We've decided to treat the engine as separate project for a later date as we want to use the lorry for some of the centinary events so we will use the six cylinder Knight for the time being.One piston has a special low compression mod just in case someone has a spare .

P1020538.jpgWe've been making all the brackets and clamps for the body which is slowly coming together also got given the remains of an original bonnet which has taken the guesstamating out of the profile against the bulkhead which also gave me the size of the handles and beading.

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Hi Duncan,

 

You have found a nice engine to work on, I rebuilt a 1914 car type Daimler Knight engine a couple of years ago, very similar to what you have,

 

 

Daimler%20sleeve%20valve%20rebuild%203_zpsmyqmklnf.jpg

 

 

Daimler%20sleeve%20valve%20rebuild%206_zpslh4h5iuk.jpg

 

 

Daimler%20sleeve%20valve%20rebuild%204_zpsuv6tme38.jpg

 

when you get into it, if you have any questions please get in touch.

 

 

Andy

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