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I've been spending again! My '43 GPW


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After Mike helped me move the tub this morning, he went home and took the valves out of the engine. This job has been waiting until he could borrow a side valve removal tool from a friend.

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March 1st - Fuel and Oil Filter On March 1st, I refitted the oil filter. I'd done the whole job without draining the oil from the can, just taping up the inlet and outlet connections. Like on Jes

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I've been painting again today, but thought you'd like to see what I am spraying with. For these small parts, I'm using an Iwata Kustom TH Airbrush. It's actually a bit more than just an airbrush, £300+ more than just an airbrush! It's half way between an airbrush and a mini touch up gun. Paint flow is gravity feed through a 0.6mm nozzle, with optional tips to give a circle or fan shaped spray pattern, with a larger coverage than a normal modelling airbrush. The clear section in my palm is a water trap, which also forms a convenient handle.

It is dual action, the first part of the trigger action starts the airflow, and as the trigger is pulled further back, the paint flow increases proportionally. A screw at the back of the brush can limit the backwards travel of the needle, giving a controlled constant paint setting, and another screw on the bottom just behind the tip adjusts the air pressure, so you can have a very fine control over the spraying. I find it most useful spraying small, difficult to reach webs and holes in castings. Because of its size, you can get the nozzle into spall places to spray, and the fine paint control means you don't flood areas with paint while trying to reach that difficult to reach spot.

For larger areas ( chassis & tub etc ), I have a small HVLP spray gun, but have not had to use that on the Jeep yet.

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A number of black components were sprayed today. Here's the filter housing. Along with this were the bottom cover, the crossover pipe and knuckle that bends into the carb.

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The fan was another black component sprayed today. Once again, the airbrush allowed me to get into all the corners without flooding the fan with paint.

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Some of the grey components painted the other day were fully cured and were wrapped in cling film to give some degree of protection until they are needed.

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Next out came the olive drab paint for a test. I was hoping I'd like it and it did look like the sample as I'd bought 10 litres! A small sample was sprayed on some scrap steel and taken outside into natural light. It turns out that it is very similar to the green on the Jeep when first purchased.

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So satisfied with the test, a number of small parts were given a blast of Olive Drab. The airbrush was particularly useful for getting into all the odd holes and corners in the pintle hook. This shot with the camera flash shows how much colour cameras can lie in comparison with the outdoor picture.

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Fuel filter and front body handles.

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Inside the locker lids, trailer socket and shovel strap. Also painted were the steering column, rear handles and spare wheel carrier. Another colour change due to lighting!

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and the NOS oil filter bracket which came in olive drab, was sprayed grey to match the engine.

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Everything has been left to dry now.

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Jessie

 

Thanks for taking the time to take and post the photos. Although I'm not a Jeep owner myself, it's is very interesting watching the progress you are making :)

 

Kind regards

 

Vulture

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Hi Vulture

I've seen threads like this in the past, and always found them very useful reference material, especially as the attached photos often show disassembled parts more clearly than the maintenance manuals do. It only takes a few extra minutes to take some pictures and post them up, so hopefully someone else tackling a rebuild will find them useful.

After giving all the green parts a second coat of paint, I decided to have a go at the chassis. The legs of the 'A' frame were a bit rotten, but I couldn't tell how badly the chassis was behind them, so the 'A' frame had to come off. The rivets put up a stubborn fight, needing both the heads grinding off and the centre drilling out before they would release. Eventually they gave up their grip and the 'A' frame came away. While the ends are rotten, I've got an idea forming on a repair so it can be re-fitted.

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The axles were removed today. They put up a bit of a fight, but my engine hoist came in very useful for lifting the chassis.

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The rear axle, shown here, was second to be removed. I left the springs attached to the axles as I didn't want to crawl around on the floor trying to remove the U bolt nust, as some were badly corroded, and are likely to need grinding off.

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The front axle. This is one of the next areas to be stripped after the chassis has been stripped fully.

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The chassis was leaned up against the wall to make some floor space and it also gave better access to some of the other bolts that needed removing.

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This spring shackle/bolt was the stubborn one, and it wouldn't budge either direction.

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Heat didn't make any difference, and I ended up having to grind out the centre tube before the remains could be forced out. There's still some of the thread left at each end of the bracket. I may be able to get the remains of the bolt out of the tube, and weld the tube back into the bracket. I don't really want to grind the rivets off to replace the whole hanger.

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All four of the single bolts that hold the springs show significant signs of wear. I don't think this has seen a grease gun since it left the factory!

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The pedals were removed from the chassis along with the master brake cylinder which looks like it has been using water as the fluid rather than brake fluid.

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My back is still causing problems, but I did manage to do something useful yesterday. First off was the beginning of repairing the front bumper. The main job was to grind off the brackets that had been added for a winch. Forunately, each bracket had only been welded along two sides.

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Several holes were found behind each bracket which will need welding up. The bottom edge of the bumper is quite rotten in places and will need cutting out and replacing. The rest, while a bit battered, will clean and straighten up.

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The reason I want to keep the battered bumper is that is has a nice 'f' mark.

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The chassis cross member was also cleaned up. This was caked in crud up to half an inch thick in places. A combination of oil and mud I think, but it had baked hard so the jet was wouldn't move even the smallest amount. It was hacked off with a large flat blade screwdriver, with a final clean in a petrol bath.

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The cross member also has a nice 'f' mark which was uncovered during cleaning.

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The rear of the chassis had the remains of the pintle hook reinforcing plate ground off showing the area needing repairing. The repairs will take place after the chassis has been sand blasted, and I'm hoping that can go to be done next week.

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Edited by Jessie The Jeep
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I'd rather repair the original, than just steal the 'f'. That seems like cheating to me! It's not bad enough to scrap.

 

 

Totally agree, was said it jest.

Even if the "F" was the only salvageable bit I would not do it.

Somehow it does not seem right.

The trick is judging when it is worth salvaging or replacing.

 

Mike

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